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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2000
Howard Stringer, chairman and chief executive of Sony, wants to see the American Film Institute take a leadership role in "redefining the moving image in the digital era. This is a de facto revolution and we have to embrace it" ("Stringer Is Chosen to Head AFI's Board of Trustees," by Kathleen Craughwell, Jan. 8). What this really refers to, in everyday English, is shooting movies on videotape rather than film. For some years now, Sony has been waging a campaign to persuade filmmakers that film is old-fashioned, and that video origination is the inevitable future of the industry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989 | NINA EASTON
Akio Morita wasn't the first foreigner to buy a movie studio during a decade when ownership of Hollywood companies began to shift overseas. But because he also is the founder and chairman of the Japanese electronic giant Sony Corp., his purchase last fall of Columbia Pictures Entertainment for $3.4 billion, easily became the decade's most ambitious and controversial move into Hollywood movie-making. Sony's purchase came two years after it bought another American entertainment giant, CBS Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
The hit Mark Wahlberg comedy "Ted" topped the DVD sales chart for the second week in a row, easily besting two new competitors: The science-fiction flop "Total Recall" and comedy "Pitch Perfect. " Sony Pictures' "Total Recall," a remake of the 1990 adaptation of a Philip K. Dick story, was the most rented movie the week before Christmas, according to Rentrak Corp. However Universal Pictures' "Ted" and "Pitch Perfect" are not yet available to rent from outlets including Redbox and Netflix.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1995
You may have missed a small yet significant reason Sony continues to market the Betamax tape format. About the time Betamax was heading off to obscurity, the Betacam format (which uses the same tape cartridge at a faster speed) was making its way into the broadcast industry. It soon became the worldwide standard for electronic news gathering and remains so today. As long as Sony is churning out tape stock for thousands of Betacams around the globe, keeping the cassettes available to home Betamax users probably isn't as big a deal as it might seem.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | Wesley Lowery
In its first week of release on DVD and Blue-ray, Denzel Washington's action-thriller “Flight” soared to the top of the rental chart but failed to knock "Hotel Transylvania" out of its No. 1 spot in the sales rankings. Paramount's “Flight,” which earned Washington an Oscar nomination, was the most-rented disc in the U.S. during the week ending Feb. 10, but came in second in sales. “Hotel Transylvania,” the computer-animated comedy produced by Sony, was the top seller in its second week since being released on disc.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Stefan Stern
All companies sit somewhere in a supply chain. Most have competitors and collaborators. And yet we look at businesses very often in isolation - as if their results depend solely on their own separate efforts. The principal achievement of the book "Network Advantage: How to Unlock Value From Your Alliances and Partnerships" is to draw attention to the importance of these broader networks to the success or failure of businesses. With detailed and thoroughly researched case studies, the authors - Henrich Greve and Andrew Shipilov of INSEAD global graduate business school and Timothy Rowley of the Rotman School of Management in Toronto - show how to take a more systematic approach to the portfolio of networks and alliances in which businesses find themselves.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1987
Sony's effort to buy CBS Records ("Sony Has Made $1.8 Billion Offer to Buy CBS Records," Sept. 12) could preface a new chapter in "The Selling of America." With so many household American brand names already in foreign hands--GE, Norelco, Magnavox, Philco, Smith-Corona and others--it may be hard to be concerned about the purchase of a record company even if it is the world's largest. We've sold off our consumer electronics hardware businesses to foreigners, why not sell off the software as well?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Sony Pictures is skipping over ”The Lost Symbol” and heading into an “Inferno,” announcing Tuesday that the 2013 Dan Brown novel will be its next Robert Langdon movie. The studio has hired writer David Koepp, who penned the 2009 hit “Angels & Demons” based on Brown's novel of the same name, and aims to release the movie in December 2015. Tom Hanks is attached to return in the Langdon role; no director has been announced. Released in May, the “Inferno” novel centers on Langdon and his partner Sienna, who are off on an adventure in Florence, Italy, sparked by a clue on a modified rendition of Botticelli's “Map of Hell.” The book, the fourth in the Langdon series, quickly became a bestseller upon its release.
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