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Sophia Loren

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2007 | From Reuters
When the Rome Film Festival forgot to invite Sophia Loren for its first edition last year, she was said to be furious at the snub. This year, organizers made good by giving Loren a lifetime achievement award and scheduling a series of events to honor the half-century career of an actress who has been called Italy's best-known export after pasta. "It's the first time I have had a career award in Italy; I hope I deserve it," said the 73-year-old Oscar-winning star.
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NEWS
January 12, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
To complement the dramatic, black and gold Andrew Gn gown worn by Juliana Margulies -- star of "The Good Wife" and Golden Globe nominee for lead actress in a TV drama -- makeup artists Molly R. Stern went for what she calls an "Italian-inspired smoky cat eye. " Stern started with L'Oreal's black liquid eyeliner and created a swooping cat eye toward the outer corner.  "I took it really heavy at the edge of the eye," Stern said.  "It's Sophia Loren-inspired...
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2011 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The actress recalls moments working with Burl Ives, Paul Newman and Charlie Chaplin. During an interview with the Los Angeles Times, Sophia Loren commented on some of the leading men and directors she's worked with over the years: 'Desire Under the Elms' (1958) "It was the first movie I made [in Hollywood]. It was a very dramatic movie with Burl Ives, a beautiful actor. I had a wonderful relationship with him. The drama was a little bit like what we had in Italy. It was a very strong drama and for me at that age I was overwhelmed by doing it, but still interested in trying.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2011
'An Academy Tribute to Sophia Loren' When: 8 p.m. Wednesday Where: Samuel Goldwyn Theatre, 8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills Tickets: sold-out but there will be a stand-by line Information: (310) 247-3000 or http://www.oscars.org
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Apparently Sophia Loren didn't get the memo that she is a septuagenarian and a grandmother because at 76 she is as stunning as when she first arrived in Hollywood more than 50 years ago. Sitting on a comfy sofa in the lobby of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Samuel Goldwyn Theater, Loren remains the epitome of glamour and graciousness. Dressed in a red pantsuit with red boots, Loren is svelte with barely a line on her face. Her voice is as distinctively earthy, her accent as thickly Italian as ever — she even apologizes when she can only think of a certain word in her native tongue.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Sophia Loren will receive a lifetime achievement award today at the Chicago International Film Festival just in time for the world premiere of her movie, "Saturday, Sunday and Monday." Loren estimated that she has made about 100 pictures in her native Italy and in the United States since her debut 39 years ago as a teen-age extra playing a slave in "Quo Vadis." Her other works include "Two Women," "Marriage Italian Style" and "The Cassandra Crossing."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Soleil" is Sophia Loren's best film in years--never mind that it will be playing at the Monica 4-Plex on Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m. only, for an open run. It's worth catching. Traditional in style and sentiment, this 1997 production packs an emotional wallop, thanks to Loren's enduring, formidable presence and beautifully understated performance for veteran French actor-director-writer Roger Hanin.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1994 | KENT BLACK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sonny Bono was clearly befuddled. The ex-mayor of Palm Springs, founder of the 5-year-old Palm Springs International Film Festival, squinted at his notes and gripped the microphone like a man adrift. "Is this thing on?" he croaked. Those gathered at the Plaza Theater for the festival's opening-night screening last Thursday of the French hit "Les Visiteurs" fidgeted and giggled when Bono held up a letter from President Clinton but then declined to read it due to political differences.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sophia Loren doesn't mean to not lie about her age, exactly. Having been famously 15 when first discovered, and 44 heralded years of screen acting having healthily ensued since then by anyone's count, she explains, it's simply too late not to cop now. "What can I do? I started so young, that it's impossible." A chuckle. "Why deny it?" Is the milestone just reached one she perhaps takes some pride in? "No," she says matter-of-factly. "I'm just surprised I am 60. I'm surprised!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
She'll Be There: In Academy Award news, Sophia Loren, named best actress in 1961 and the recipient of an honorary Oscar in 1990, has been added to the list of presenters at the 65th annual Oscar show, to be held March 29.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Apparently Sophia Loren didn't get the memo that she is a septuagenarian and a grandmother because at 76 she is as stunning as when she first arrived in Hollywood more than 50 years ago. Sitting on a comfy sofa in the lobby of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Samuel Goldwyn Theater, Loren remains the epitome of glamour and graciousness. Dressed in a red pantsuit with red boots, Loren is svelte with barely a line on her face. Her voice is as distinctively earthy, her accent as thickly Italian as ever — she even apologizes when she can only think of a certain word in her native tongue.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2011 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The actress recalls moments working with Burl Ives, Paul Newman and Charlie Chaplin. During an interview with the Los Angeles Times, Sophia Loren commented on some of the leading men and directors she's worked with over the years: 'Desire Under the Elms' (1958) "It was the first movie I made [in Hollywood]. It was a very dramatic movie with Burl Ives, a beautiful actor. I had a wonderful relationship with him. The drama was a little bit like what we had in Italy. It was a very strong drama and for me at that age I was overwhelmed by doing it, but still interested in trying.
OPINION
November 25, 2009 | By Nina Burleigh
As Thanksgiving approaches, my friends at home are pondering how to endure holiday feasting and still slip into their size 0s, even though the wafer silhouette is overdue to be replaced as an ideal in these dire times. I have been away from Manhattan only five months and, suddenly, I want amplitude. Living in Italy, where all the women seem genetically curvaceous and not so troubled by extra flesh, natural ectomorphs like me seem like wraiths of the financial apocalypse. I just don't fit in among these robust specimens.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The thing about Clark Gable, said Sophia Loren from her home in Geneva, Switzerland, was his watch. The sex symbol whose film career has spanned nearly six decades worked with the Hollywood icon in the lighthearted 1960 comedy "It Started in Naples." "He was always looking at the watch when it came to 4 or 4:30 in the afternoon," she said by phone. "Even if we were in the middle of a scene at 5, I could hear the alarm going off and he would leave the set." "We were flabbergasted. What?"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2007 | From Reuters
When the Rome Film Festival forgot to invite Sophia Loren for its first edition last year, she was said to be furious at the snub. This year, organizers made good by giving Loren a lifetime achievement award and scheduling a series of events to honor the half-century career of an actress who has been called Italy's best-known export after pasta. "It's the first time I have had a career award in Italy; I hope I deserve it," said the 73-year-old Oscar-winning star.
MAGAZINE
February 11, 2007 | Dan Neil
By virtue of my other life as the newspaper's automotive critic, I get one of Pirelli's coveted calendars in the mail annually. Year in and year out, the calendar is as reliable an almanac of gazing-male sexual imagination as can be found. You needn't consult an expert to deconstruct Harri Peccinotti's 1969 images of ripe young mouths smoking and eating popsicles, the tectonic pressures already building under the cultural taboo of oral sex.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The emotional Italian temperament has always seemed ideally suited to telling tales of grand passion, and this is especially true for "Don't Move," a full-bodied, all-stops-out love story with a wrenching impact that makes most of today's screen romances seem undernourished by comparison. Not surprisingly, the film won Donatellos -- Italy's version of the Oscars -- for both its stars, Penelope Cruz and Sergio Castellitto, who also directed.
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