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Sophie Fiennes

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2003 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
One of the most startling things about the United States for many Europeans is the penury and squalor that is the underreported dark side of the American Dream. When London-based documentary filmmaker Sophie Fiennes traveled to Los Angeles for the first time, it was to visit her brother Ralph on the set of "Strange Days." She had friends in Los Feliz and a boyfriend in Topanga Canyon. But her curiosity led her to Chinatown and Little Tokyo, Koreatown and South-Central.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2003 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
One of the most startling things about the United States for many Europeans is the penury and squalor that is the underreported dark side of the American Dream. When London-based documentary filmmaker Sophie Fiennes traveled to Los Angeles for the first time, it was to visit her brother Ralph on the set of "Strange Days." She had friends in Los Feliz and a boyfriend in Topanga Canyon. But her curiosity led her to Chinatown and Little Tokyo, Koreatown and South-Central.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
"Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow" is that rare art documentary — one that places the art front and center, not as an adjunct to its maker's biography. The artist in this case, Anselm Kiefer, doesn't appear until 20 minutes into the film, and he's always seen in interaction, mainly with the crew of assistants who help him produce and move his monumental canvases and sculptures. Sophie Fiennes filmed the last two years of Kiefer's decade-and-a-half project in the South of France, where he turned the site of an abandoned silk factory into a studio compound and elaborate invented world.
NEWS
May 31, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
BUDD Boetticher's westerns flew under the radar in the 1950s. Considered B movies, they were relegated to drive-ins. It didn't help that Boetticher's star was lanky Randolph Scott, whose best days were behind him. But between 1956 and 1960, they created a string of sparse movies that would influence filmmakers to come, including Clint Eastwood and Taylor Hackford.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012
Although "8 Murders a Day," Charlie Minn's disturbing documentary about the ultra-violent drug war in Juarez, Mexico, is somewhat repetitive and not terribly well-organized, it shines an important light on what the filmmaker deems "the greatest human rights disaster in the world today. " Aided by vivid archival news clips, you-are-there footage from the so-called "murder capital of the world" (Juarez saw more than 3,000 homicides in 2010 alone, hence the movie's title) and frank interviews with academics, reporters and first-hand observers, Minn lays blame for the border city's anguish largely on Felipe Calderon who, after being elected Mexico's president in 2006, waged what became a failed — and, some say, disingenuous — fight against Juarez's competing drug cartels.
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