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Sophie Maslow

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Sophie Maslow, who began her career in modern dance as a member of the Martha Graham Dance Company and went on to choreograph her own works, many inspired by folk songs and poems that uphold the dignity of ordinary people, has died. She was 95. Maslow died June 25 in New York City, her friend and colleague Donald McKayle said last week. In recent years she had been in failing health. "Sophie was a force in modern dance," said McKayle, professor of dance at UC Irvine.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Sophie Maslow, who began her career in modern dance as a member of the Martha Graham Dance Company and went on to choreograph her own works, many inspired by folk songs and poems that uphold the dignity of ordinary people, has died. She was 95. Maslow died June 25 in New York City, her friend and colleague Donald McKayle said last week. In recent years she had been in failing health. "Sophie was a force in modern dance," said McKayle, professor of dance at UC Irvine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like millions of other Jews, American modern-dance pioneer Sophie Maslow was horrified by film footage of the Holocaust that emerged after World War II. The tragedy awakened a desire to learn more about her heritage, however, which led her to the stories of Sholom Aleichem. Aleichem (1859-1916), a Russian Jew who came to the United States in 1914, wrote with humor about daily life in his homeland and the plight of poverty-stricken fellow immigrants.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like millions of other Jews, American modern-dance pioneer Sophie Maslow was horrified by film footage of the Holocaust that emerged after World War II. The tragedy awakened a desire to learn more about her heritage, however, which led her to the stories of Sholom Aleichem. Aleichem (1859-1916), a Russian Jew who came to the United States in 1914, wrote with humor about daily life in his homeland and the plight of poverty-stricken fellow immigrants.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL
In its latest program of classic modern dance solos, the American Repertory Dance Company looked into what it called the "Heart of Woman" at UCLA's Schoenberg Hall on Saturday and found distinctive universal statements about the cost of survival. For instance, Jane Dudley's 1938 "Harmonica Breakdown" imaginatively depicted resilience in hard times, with Nancy Colahan executing its recurrent stiff-kneed slide-walk so powerfully that slogging through adversity seemed gloriously heroic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
Jane Dudley, a champion of dance as social protest who worked with modern-dance pioneer Martha Graham and became a leading teacher and choreographer in the United States and Britain, has died, news reports said. She was 89. The Times of London said Dudley died Wednesday in the British capital, where she had lived since 1970. No cause of death was given. Born in New York in 1912, she began dancing at the age of 6, when her mother decided she needed to be more graceful.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000
The locally based American Repertory Dance Company continues to honor "The Indomitable Spirit of Woman" with exciting programs of modern dance revivals and reconstructions. This week, however, the pre- and proto-feminist choreographies will not only include the company's acclaimed stagings of works by Helen Tamiris, Mary Wigman, Agnes de Mille, Sophie Maslow, Lester Horton, Eve Gentry and Valerie Bettis, but two new works as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
A need to honor and showcase groundbreaking 20th century masters united two excellent but otherwise dissimilar programs on campus stages over the weekend, with major moderns invoked by the American Repertory Dance Company at El Camino College on Friday and their classical counterparts celebrated by Les Grands Ballets Canadiens at Cal State L.A. on Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1998 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
A tall, lanky professor, sporting a "Find Yourself in the Arts" T-shirt, is putting a UC Irvine dance class through its paces. "Turn up--and feather down," he says, his hands cascading like a waterfall. A few moments later, he breaks into song, accompanying a blues recording in a velvety baritone. "Fare thee well, oh honey," he croons, losing himself in the music before addressing the dancers again "Don't blur--be very clear when you wave goodbye.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1994 | DAVID GERE, David Gere is a staff critic at the San Francisco Chronicle and also teaches at UCLA
Southern trees bear a strange fruit Blood on the leaves and blood at the root Black body swinging in the Southern breeze Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees . . . * It's a fine day in New York in the wartime 1940s, and choreographer Pearl Primus is discussing poetry over lunch with blues singer Billie Holiday and lyricist Lewis Allan.
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