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Sophie Thompson

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Adapted from a play and given the heart of a novel, Pat O'Connor's "Dancing at Lughnasa" is one of the more quietly thoughtful experiences you may have at the movies this season. If that doesn't exactly sound like a ringing endorsement, let's break it down. Thoughtful? Absolutely.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people seem to live more intensely when they're being photographed than in the flesh. One of them may be Patsy Kensit. Kensit has the first prerequisite of a true movie star: She soaks up attention on screen. In Don Boyd's "Twenty-One" (at Mann's Hazard Center), a sly, dryly cynical portrait of a sexually adventurous young British emigre in Manhattan, she is playing a demanding part, a virtuoso turn that requires her to interact with the other characters and the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Since it is a truth universally acknowledged that even a moderately successful version of a Jane Austen novel has a leg up on most original screenplays, it's not difficult to enjoy the genteel amusements "Emma" provides even while wishing its virtues were less wholly on the surface.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2008 | Mary McNamara, Times Television Critic
Twenty years and a life with Tim Burton later, Helena Bonham Carter's pre-Raphaelite ingenue days are so far behind her she's selling human meat pies on Fleet Street with Sweeney Todd. So clearly it's time to have another go at E.M. Forster's "A Room With a View" -- especially since it provides such a lovely natural transition from the recent weeks of Jane Austen's greatest hits Sunday night on "Masterpiece. " This "Room," just like the "Sense and Sensibility" that concluded last week, is adapted by Andrew Davies, who seems to be on a bit of a tear these days -- his take on "Brideshead Revisited" is due in theaters in July.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Jane Austen never married, possibly never received so much as a passionate kiss, and formed her closest emotional bonds with her spinster older sister. Yet, in one of the enduring mysteries of genius, few writers have had a more acute sense of romantic psychology, or had more piercing insights into the relationship of people in love. No place in the human heart was unknown to her, which is why her popularity not only endures, but increases. Especially in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1996 | David Gritten, David Gritten, based in England, is a regular contributor to Calendar
Together, they constitute a priceless minor comic turn that comes close to stealing a whole film: Phyllida Law and Sophie Thompson as the impoverished mother-daughter tag team, Mrs. and Miss Bates. In a few telling scenes in Douglas McGrath's adaptation of Jane Austen's classic 19th century novel "Emma," they upstage the cast, the crew, even the exquisite surrounding scenery.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1999 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It's been a tough two years," Julie Andrews muses. "I can't pretend it's been easy. But I'm a very optimistic lady." She says this with a brisk, determined nod--an attitude Mary Poppins herself would appreciate. It certainly has been a hard couple of years for Andrews, to the extent that it comes as a relief to find her working, healthy and in good spirits.
NEWS
November 3, 1991
It certainly isn't elementary for an actor to play Sherlock Holmes. At least it hasn't been for Jeremy Brett, who begins his eighth season this month as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's super snoop on PBS' "Mystery!" series. (And the first five seasons are repeating on cable's Arts & Entertainment Network.) "I enjoy playing him now," Brett said. "He doesn't hurt me any more." Brett, 55, was holding court at a corner table at the Polo Lounge at the Beverly Hills Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1998 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a frequent contributor to Calendar
For almost two decades now, Meryl Streep has been the dominant female presence in almost every film in which she has appeared. She assumes starring roles as if to the manner born; it's hard to recall a time when she was anything but a lead actress. Back in the 1970s, of course, it wasn't so. Streep spent three years at the Yale School of Drama and appeared onstage in Shakespeare, Shaw and Tennessee Williams--and not always in lead roles.
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