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FOOD
June 18, 2013
  Rhubarb-strawberry sorbet Note: Rhubarb and strawberries unite in a delicious sorbet with results that yield a refreshing treat for a warm summer's night. It's a cool way to end a meal. Total time: 20 minutes, plus freezing time Servings: Makes 1 1/2 quarts Note: Adapted from David Lebovitz's "The Perfect Scoop. " If your rhubarb stalks are more than an inch wide, slice them in half lengthwise. 3/4 pound rhubarb (5 or 6 thin stalks), trimmed 3/4 cup sugar 10 ounces fresh strawberries (about 1 1/2 cups)
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NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
On Sunday, what with emergency shopping (the Smithfield ham had spoiled and we needed fresh water chestnuts for the pearl balls) and various other activities, I completely forgot to make dessert for a dinner party that night. I realized this at 5:30 p.m. It would have been a major deal to clear enough space to bake a cake or whatever else I could dream up from the contents of my pantry and refrigerator. Not enough time to make a custard for ice cream. But I could make a sorbet.
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FOOD
September 17, 2008
  Lime coconut sorbet Total time: 20 minutes, plus freezing time Servings: Makes 5 cups Note: Adapted from Brix@1601 executive pastry chef Renee Ward. Coconut purée is available at Surfas in Culver City, Nicole's Gourmet Foods in South Pasadena and online at www.perfectpuree.com . This recipe may be made up to a week before assembling the coconut coupes. 1 1/2 cups milk 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar 3 cups coconut purée 1/2 cup plus 4 1/2 teaspoons lime juice (4 to 5 limes)
FOOD
June 18, 2013
  Rhubarb-strawberry sorbet Note: Rhubarb and strawberries unite in a delicious sorbet with results that yield a refreshing treat for a warm summer's night. It's a cool way to end a meal. Total time: 20 minutes, plus freezing time Servings: Makes 1 1/2 quarts Note: Adapted from David Lebovitz's "The Perfect Scoop. " If your rhubarb stalks are more than an inch wide, slice them in half lengthwise. 3/4 pound rhubarb (5 or 6 thin stalks), trimmed 3/4 cup sugar 10 ounces fresh strawberries (about 1 1/2 cups)
FOOD
July 30, 2008
  Berries jubilee with peach sorbet and salted candied almonds Total time: 35 minutes, plus freezing and marinating time Servings: 6 Note: An easy way to peel peaches is to submerge them in boiling water for 30 seconds, drain them, and the skins will slip right off. For the peach sorbet, you can substitute best-quality store-bought sorbet. Peach sorbet 1 pound ripe peaches, pitted, peeled and cut into 1/2 -inch pieces 6 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon orange liqueur 1. Place the peach pieces and one-half cup water in a saucepan over medium-high heat, cover and cook for about 5 minutes, until the peaches are tender and cooked through.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Carmela Ice Cream founders Jessica Mortarotti and Zachary Cox are teaching fall ice cream classes, instructing students on the basics of ice cream and sorbet bases. They will also discuss flavor inspiration, using seasonal farmers market produce and pairing ideas. The class includes demonstrations and tastings for brown butter sage ice cream and cranberry orange thyme sorbet; go home with a pint of each. Classes are Nov. 3 and Nov. 10 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. $100 ($90 with bring-a-friend discount)
FOOD
March 14, 1996
Two of my family's favorite desserts are fruit sorbet and chiffon pies. I have not made these desserts in years because they are made with raw egg whites. This year I am looking for safe ways to make these old family favorites. Is there a way to make chiffon pies by beating and cooking the egg whites in a manner similar to making 7-minute frosting? Would that kill the bacteria? Does freezing the sorbet kill the bacteria in egg whites? If so, could I simply freeze the pies, then defrost them to serve them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1998
Re "Feud Involving Valli's Wife Investigated," Oct. 15. My advice to the Vallis and the Avalons is get over themselves. Everyone is made to feel special at the Secret Garden Restaurant. You are no better than anyone else and deserve no special attention. The Secret Garden is a wonderful place that I would highly recommend. When you take into consideration that the meal includes a delicious large bowl of soup, then is followed by a choice of salad (not one of which is a typical "American" salad of iceberg and a tomato)
FOOD
April 9, 1992 | CHARLES PERRY, CHARLES PERRY,
For 800 years the symbol of the Chianti region has been a black rooster ( gallo nero ) . However, a San Francisco court recently ruled that winemakers belonging to the Consorzio Chianti Classico may no longer refer to their wines as Gallo Nero Chiantis because this infringes on the name of E & J Gallo Wineries of Modesto, and the Consorzio declined to appeal because of mounting court costs. The black rooster will still appear (unnamed) on Consorzio labels, however.
FOOD
April 8, 2001 | DONNA DEANE, TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR
The rosy pink color of this sorbet makes it an ideal springtime dessert. It would also be a lovely palate freshener at Easter brunch or dinner. Raspberry vodka, available in most supermarket liquor sections, adds a nice fruitiness and lime juice a delightful tang. Rhubarb is a tart stalk that is treated as a fruit. Look for pink or cherry-red stalks about the same size as celery stalks in the supermarket produce section. They should be crisp and firm.
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Boozy ice cream for when you have the flu? Ohio-based small-batch ice cream maker Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams is making the news this flu season with one of its most popular winter flavors -- Influenza Sorbet, made with honey, ginger, orange and lemon juices, Maker's Mark bourbon and cayenne pepper.  Influenza Sorbet is no flu cure, but owner Jeni Britton Bauer told ABC News that the ice cream flavor inspired by a drink her grandmother made...
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Carmela Ice Cream founders Jessica Mortarotti and Zachary Cox are teaching fall ice cream classes, instructing students on the basics of ice cream and sorbet bases. They will also discuss flavor inspiration, using seasonal farmers market produce and pairing ideas. The class includes demonstrations and tastings for brown butter sage ice cream and cranberry orange thyme sorbet; go home with a pint of each. Classes are Nov. 3 and Nov. 10 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. $100 ($90 with bring-a-friend discount)
FOOD
September 17, 2008
  Lime coconut sorbet Total time: 20 minutes, plus freezing time Servings: Makes 5 cups Note: Adapted from Brix@1601 executive pastry chef Renee Ward. Coconut purée is available at Surfas in Culver City, Nicole's Gourmet Foods in South Pasadena and online at www.perfectpuree.com . This recipe may be made up to a week before assembling the coconut coupes. 1 1/2 cups milk 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar 3 cups coconut purée 1/2 cup plus 4 1/2 teaspoons lime juice (4 to 5 limes)
FOOD
July 30, 2008 | David Lebovitz, Special to The Times
WHEN I lived in San Francisco, I was used to the summer fog, which kept things pretty cool. Moving to Paris, I imagined idle afternoons enjoying the gentle breezes of summer, sipping my citron presse in cafes by the Seine. Instead I'm sweating it out in a top-floor apartment. While it's tres parisienne, the charming zinc roof just overhead turns the place into a raging four d'ete: a summer oven. So don't complain about how hot you are until you've spent August at my place.
FOOD
July 30, 2008
  Berries jubilee with peach sorbet and salted candied almonds Total time: 35 minutes, plus freezing and marinating time Servings: 6 Note: An easy way to peel peaches is to submerge them in boiling water for 30 seconds, drain them, and the skins will slip right off. For the peach sorbet, you can substitute best-quality store-bought sorbet. Peach sorbet 1 pound ripe peaches, pitted, peeled and cut into 1/2 -inch pieces 6 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon orange liqueur 1. Place the peach pieces and one-half cup water in a saucepan over medium-high heat, cover and cook for about 5 minutes, until the peaches are tender and cooked through.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Ten bucks here will buy you a chilled summer street treat of mushy pea sorbet with candied bacon and mint syrup. Then it's off to the opera for some bubble-gum Buddhist Busby Berkeley acrobatics. Second-city, easily overlooked, clearly insecure Manchester has just entered the festival racket. It's unlikely that this city will ever have the tourist appeal of such summer festival faves as Edinburgh, Salzburg or Aix-en-Provence.
FOOD
August 20, 1992 | FAYE LEVY, Levy is a cookbook author. and
Fruit sorbets answer all our desires for summer desserts--they are cold, refreshing, light, and they capture the essence of the fruit they're made from. What's more, they are virtually fat-free, and they are easy to make at home. Sorbets can be made from any fruit juice or any fruit soft enough to become a smooth puree. Easiest to use are melons, strawberries and kiwis--these fruits don't need poaching and the purees don't require straining.
FOOD
November 29, 1990 | MINNIE BERNARDINO and DONNA DEANE, TIMES FOOD STYLISTS
A FISH STORY Tomato Trout Bake Pasta or rice bed Steamed or sauteed green beans Persimmon sorbet Nothing fishy about this rainbow trout. It's simple, healthful and quick. Oven-steamed in foil with flavorful vegetables, the fish is not masked with any complicated sauce. The secret to tender, moist trout is to avoid overcooking. The fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork.
MAGAZINE
June 17, 2007 | Amy Scattergood, Amy Scattergood is a Times staff writer.
With all the heat in restaurant kitchens, is it any wonder chefs love to play with ice as much as they do with fire? Especially as temperatures rise outside, they're escaping to the cooler corners of their kitchens to experiment with ice cream machines, Pacojets and blast freezers. This impulse toward cold play makes sense: The pyrotechnics that form so much of a chef's creative repertoire need a polar opposite, in both degree and kind.
NEWS
September 1, 2005 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
I was supposed to be in line for one of the newly offered sandwiches at Boule, the posh patissier on La Cienega Boulevard in Los Angeles, but I kept getting distracted. There was the array of ice creams and sorbets, every bit as beautiful as those at Berthillon on the Ile St. Louis in Paris. Tahitian vanilla bean, pistachio, a melon ice, Chino strawberry, Venezuelan chocolate. There was the Japanese iron teapot glazed with white, like a knobbly pine cone under the snow.
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