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NEWS
July 28, 1989 | From Times wire service s
The former geisha whose tales of infidelity brought down Japan's prime minister said today she cried tears of happiness when she saw Sosuke Uno announce his resignation on nationwide television this week. "Victory at last," was Mitsuko Nakanishi's first reaction when Uno told the nation Monday he would resign. "Tears came running down. I felt like an athlete who just won a game."
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NEWS
August 8, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
In a shift toward youth designed to reverse its dwindling support among voters, Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party today chose Toshiki Kaifu, 58, a former education minister, as the successor to outgoing Prime Minister Sosuke Uno. In a caucus in which 447 representatives cast effective votes, Kaifu received 279 votes, or 62.4%, on the first ballot against two challengers to become the party's new president.
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NEWS
July 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Ruling party officials eager to shore up their battered organization opened talks Thursday on a successor to resigning Japanese Prime Minister Sosuke Uno. Secretary General Ryutaro Hashimoto, the party's No. 2 official, appeared to have won the support of many party leaders, although some believe that at age 51 he is too young to take the job while the party is in crisis, one official said. The Liberal Democratic Party officials decided that a replacement should be picked Aug.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | From United Press International
The former geisha whose tales of infidelity brought down Japan's prime minister said Friday that she cried tears of happiness when she saw Sosuke Uno announce his planned resignation on nationwide television this week. "Victory at last," was Mitsuko Nakanishi's first reaction when Uno told the nation Monday he would resign. "Tears came running down. I felt like an athlete who just won a game."
BUSINESS
July 26, 1989 | From Reuters
Tokyo stock prices soared to a record close for the first time in eight weeks Tuesday as market jitters were exorcised by Sunday's election loss for the ruling party and Prime Minister Sosuke Uno's decision to resign. The key 225-share Nikkei index soared 445.57, or 1.31%, to a record close of 34,538.90 after hitting an intra-day high of 34,542.51 just before trading ended. The index rose 193.90 Monday after Uno's statement. Its previous closing peak of 34,266.
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | From Reuters
Several elder leaders of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party on Friday urged Prime Minister Sosuke Uno to resign at an early date over his alleged involvement in a sex scandal, a Japanese news agency reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1989
After less than a month in office, Japan's Prime Minister Sosuke Uno finds that his public approval rating has sunk to an almost unbelievably low 10%. Uno himself is said by friends to have sunk into near-depression. The man who just a few weeks ago was perceived as the Mr. Clean of Japanese politics--and who for that reason above all others was picked to lead the corruption-plagued ruling Liberal Democratic Party and so became head of government--is now himself battling scandal.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Parliament today approved Sosuke Uno as prime minister, and he pledged reforms to clear the air of an influence-peddling scandal that has decimated the top ranks of the governing Liberal Democratic Party. The 66-year-old former foreign minister also spoke out against the United States, saying Washington's use of its new trade law to force concessions from Japan was "like negotiating with your fists up." The conservative party also got new leaders, and Uno chose a new Cabinet in a bid to wipe the slate clean of the Recruit influence-buying scandal before elections for half the upper house of Parliament, expected within two months.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | From United Press International
The former geisha whose tales of infidelity brought down Japan's prime minister said Friday that she cried tears of happiness when she saw Sosuke Uno announce his planned resignation on nationwide television this week. "Victory at last," was Mitsuko Nakanishi's first reaction when Uno told the nation Monday he would resign. "Tears came running down. I felt like an athlete who just won a game."
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
When the vote counting was finished Monday, women had emerged as the undisputed winners in the weekend's Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly election, which had been intensely scrutinized for its trend-setting role before crucial balloting for the upper house of Parliament later this month. The major political shock of the election was that the ruling Liberal Democratic Party suffered a humiliating defeat, losing 20 of its 63 seats, in the equivalent of a state assembly.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | From Times wire service s
The former geisha whose tales of infidelity brought down Japan's prime minister said today she cried tears of happiness when she saw Sosuke Uno announce his resignation on nationwide television this week. "Victory at last," was Mitsuko Nakanishi's first reaction when Uno told the nation Monday he would resign. "Tears came running down. I felt like an athlete who just won a game."
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Ruling party officials eager to shore up their battered organization opened talks Thursday on a successor to resigning Japanese Prime Minister Sosuke Uno. Secretary General Ryutaro Hashimoto, the party's No. 2 official, appeared to have won the support of many party leaders, although some believe that at age 51 he is too young to take the job while the party is in crisis, one official said. The Liberal Democratic Party officials decided that a replacement should be picked Aug.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1989 | From Reuters
Tokyo stock prices soared to a record close for the first time in eight weeks Tuesday as market jitters were exorcised by Sunday's election loss for the ruling party and Prime Minister Sosuke Uno's decision to resign. The key 225-share Nikkei index soared 445.57, or 1.31%, to a record close of 34,538.90 after hitting an intra-day high of 34,542.51 just before trading ended. The index rose 193.90 Monday after Uno's statement. Its previous closing peak of 34,266.
NEWS
July 25, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Japanese politics were plunged into confusion Monday as the ruling Liberal Democratic Party began a desperate search for a suitable successor to Prime Minister Sosuke Uno, who announced that he will resign to take responsibility for his party's devastating losses in Sunday's election for the upper house of Parliament.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Sosuke Uno today announced his intention to resign after his ruling Liberal Democratic Party suffered a humiliating defeat Sunday in an election for the upper house of Parliament.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Paralyzed by a crisis of leadership and a loss of voter confidence, the perennial ruling party of Japan faced its first-ever defeat in a national election today. Voters cast ballots in a crucial election for the upper house of Parliament, with every poll in the country predicting that they will deprive the Liberal Democratic Party of its majority and hand the ideologically oriented Socialist Party major gains.
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, en route to Tokyo for meetings with embattled Prime Minister Sosuke Uno, said Monday that he will reassure Japan that the sex and bribery scandals that have engulfed the government will not damage U.S.-Japan cooperation. Talking to reporters on the flight from Washington, Baker said the U.S.-Japan relationship "is strong . . . durable . . . and very, very important, not just to the Pacific but to the world as a whole."
NEWS
July 25, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Japanese politics were plunged into confusion Monday as the ruling Liberal Democratic Party began a desperate search for a suitable successor to Prime Minister Sosuke Uno, who announced that he will resign to take responsibility for his party's devastating losses in Sunday's election for the upper house of Parliament.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | PAUL BLUSTEIN, The Washington Post
The former geisha who has virtually wrecked the political career of Prime Minister Sosuke Uno smiles and bows demurely. "My name," she says, "is Mitsuko Nakanishi." Nakanishi is wearing a white dress patterned with red flowers, clasped at the neck with a pearl pin.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | ART PINE and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
Early in the annual seven-nation economic summit conference here, beleaguered Japanese Prime Minister Sosuke Uno walked into the Japanese press room for what he expected would be a welcome respite from the sex-for-pay scandal that threatens to topple him from power. No sooner had Uno taken the podium, however, than he received a rude jolt from the usually loyal Japanese press corps. "Well, Mr.
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