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Sotheby S Inc

ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
As the final gavel fell in a three-day marathon of Impressionist and modern art auctions and the last registered bidders turned in their numbered paddles, observers puzzled over the state of the market. Had prices finally bottomed out at pre-boom levels, as some auction house officials contended? Was this week the beginning of an upswing? Or is any attempt to put a happy face on the high end of the art market just a desperate public-relations gesture?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2003 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
In what could be the last chapter of years of legal trouble, Christie's and Sotheby's, the world's largest auction houses, have agreed to pay $20 million each to resolve antitrust claims by customers outside the United States. The proposed settlement, which must be approved by U.S. courts, stems from a criminal case in which former Sotheby's Chairman A. Alfred Taubman was convicted of conspiring with former Christie's chief Anthony J.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2001 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys for A. Alfred Taubman rested their case at his federal price-fixing trial here Thursday without calling the former Sotheby's chairman as a witness in his own defense. Instead, the defense relied on the testimony of present and former officials of the auction house to describe the 76-year-old Taubman as a man more interested in the guest list of parties than the financial details of his business, and a man who sometimes dozed at board meetings.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2000 | Associated Press
Sotheby's has overhauled its auction commissions, matching rival Christie's new rates as the two New York auction houses face a federal antitrust investigation. Sotheby's lowered fees on Internet sales and raised some of the commissions it charges buyers at live auctions. The changes make Sotheby's more expensive than its rival for purchases under $15,000 and Christie's more expensive for purchases that cost $15,000 to $80,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Recession or not, here comes another auction season. Sotheby's and Christie's New York auction houses are set to sell about $150 million of Impressionist and modern art Tuesday through Thursday and an additional $90 million of contemporary art the following week. There's a $10-million Leger, a $9-million Pissarro, a $7-million Johns and a $6-million Mondrian--all for the taking by anyone who has the credit or the cash. But, as an undeniable sign of the times, there is no $82.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
New York's spring auction season will be a buyer's market, and Sotheby's is prepared for every last collector who has as little as $10,000 or as much as $3 million to spend on art. If that leaves you out, you can still have the fun of perusing a free auction preview exhibition at Sotheby's Beverly Hills showroom, 308 N. Rodeo Drive, today and Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., and on Sunday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The contemporary art market is down--way down from its all-time high in the fall of 1989--but it isn't out. All it takes to infuse life in the market is bargain prices for good material and a couple of mega-collectors from Los Angeles. That seemed to be the message at Sotheby's big fall sale of 82 contemporary artworks on Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1995 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Sotheby's auction house won't officially open its new facility in Beverly Hills until an Oct. 18 ribbon-cutting ceremony, but the public will get its first look this week with a preview of upcoming events. Doors will open Friday with a free exhibition of prints, photographs and jewelry to be offered at sales this month.
NEWS
April 24, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The auction of the possessions of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis got off to a spectacular start Tuesday with high drama and higher prices--including $442,500 for a rocking chair used by President Kennedy--as clamoring collectors bought merchandise totaling $4.5 million. The enduring mystique of Camelot, plus the desire to own memorabilia from one of the world's most admired women, added up to big profits both for Sotheby's, which conducted the sale, and Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2004 | Geoff Boucher
Staging an estate auction for a recently deceased celebrity can be a crass business, and when that celebrity happens to be named Cash, some unkind puns quickly spring to mind. So give credit to Sotheby's LLC for the massive auction this week in New York that is handling the estate of Johnny and June Carter Cash with as much archival reverence and sentiment as its gavel business allows. "It's a delicate thing, and we know it.
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