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Sotoo Tatsumi

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October 8, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ichiro Isoda, 77, one of Japan's best-known bankers, announced on Sunday that he will resign as chairman of Sumitomo Bank to assume moral responsibility for a scandal involving loans that a Sumitomo branch manager illegally arranged for stock price manipulation. Sotoo Tatsumi, 67, the bank's president, also said he intends to resign, but Isoda said Tatsumi would stay on for the time being.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ichiro Isoda, 77, one of Japan's best-known bankers, announced on Sunday that he will resign as chairman of Sumitomo Bank to assume moral responsibility for a scandal involving loans that a Sumitomo branch manager illegally arranged for stock price manipulation. Sotoo Tatsumi, 67, the bank's president, also said he intends to resign, but Isoda said Tatsumi would stay on for the time being.
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BUSINESS
August 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Bank Chiefs Give Ritualized Apologies: Three Japanese bank chiefs performed ritualized apologies before a parliamentary panel for their banks' roles in a web of scandals. But their remarkably similar words rang hollow to some analysts who had hoped for fundamental changes. The apologies from Yo Kurasawa, president of Industrial Bank of Japan Ltd.; Toru Hashimoto, president of Fuji Bank Ltd., and Sotoo Tatsumi, president of Sumitomo Bank Ltd.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1991 | From Reuters
Three Japanese bank chiefs performed ritualized apologies before a parliamentary panel Friday for their banks' roles in a web of scandals. But their remarkably similar words rang hollow to some analysts who had hoped for fundamental changes. The apologies were delivered before a special lower house panel investigating financial scandals borne out of Japan's 1980s "bubble economy" of soaring stock and property markets.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's financial woes over high interest rates and falling real estate and stock prices continue to spread. And now, those woes have resulted in a rare firing of a top Japanese executive. At the behest of Sumitomo Bank, the board of troubled Itoman Corp. on Friday voted to oust Yoshihiko Kawamura, who had served as president of the Osaka-based trading company since 1975.
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