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Soul Asylum

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April 7, 1986 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Are you ready for the second generation of loud, fast and somewhat snotty bands from Minneapolis? The same howling wind from the north that brought us the Replacements and Husker Du deposited Soul Asylum at the Lingerie for a late set Friday that is best summed up by one of the band's song titles: "Whoa!"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Karl Mueller, 41, a founding member of the rock band Soul Asylum, died Friday of throat cancer at his home in Minneapolis. A bass guitarist, Mueller founded the band in 1984 with friends Dave Pirner and Dan Murphy. The band enjoyed several years of underground and critical success, but was best known for its multiplatinum 1992 release "Grave Dancers Union" and the hit "Runaway Train."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM
Dave Pirner of Soul Asylum may howl like a wounded beast, but on the Minneapolis band's albums, at least, his raucous wailing is supported by coherent ideas. Often, Pirner's thinking concerns the psychic toll an individualist must pay when the prevailing attitude is go-along-to-get-along.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1998 | SANDY MASUO
** 1/2 Various artists, "The Faculty" soundtrack, Columbia/Sony Music Soundtrax. Enhancing the creepy academic theme of the movie, this collection seethes with righteous teen angst.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN, Chris Willman's Sound & Vision column appears periodically in Calendar
Rock videos . . . Public service announcements. These two go together like glue and water. Astaire and Costello. Ice-T and Heston. Samuel Goldwyn and message movies. The new Soul Asylum clip, though, is an exception that works: a video that effectively conveys the performance essence of a song and perhaps does a tiny good for humankind.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1988 | CARY DARLING
Most bands would be honored if session-slick producer Nile Rodgers, best known for the high-tech rhythmic gloss he's lent the likes of David Bowie and Duran Duran, just happened to drop by the studio for a visit. Soul Asylum--Minneapolis' highly regarded and highly melodic yet highly charged thrash-pop quartet, who headline the Roxy on Thursday and play as part of a Jesse Jackson benefit at the Palace on Friday--were merely amused.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1990 | HILLEL ITALIE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK--Sing as if you stuck your finger in a hot frying pan or write songs about drug deals and desperation and people might get the idea you're a little unhappy. But the members of Soul Asylum insist they're not bitter or cynical, just realistic. Dragging people down is not what this band stands for--even if they do present life in three-minute bursts of agony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Karl Mueller, 41, a founding member of the rock band Soul Asylum, died Friday of throat cancer at his home in Minneapolis. A bass guitarist, Mueller founded the band in 1984 with friends Dave Pirner and Dan Murphy. The band enjoyed several years of underground and critical success, but was best known for its multiplatinum 1992 release "Grave Dancers Union" and the hit "Runaway Train."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1995 | Steve Hochman
SOUL ASYLUM "Let Your Dim Light Shine" Columbia * * 1/2 Even before this album's release, there's been a chorus of charges that being Winona Ryder's beau has mellowed Dave Pirner and robbed him of his creative juice. That cynical notion is unfair both to them and to the album, which merely continues Soul Asylum's steady move toward the "mature" rock mainstream that was under way well before Ryder and Pirner even met.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1998 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a regular contributor to Calendar from New York
Five years ago, Dave Pirner had every reason to feel as though he were on top of the world. After spending more than a decade in near-obscurity, the singer-songwriter's band Soul Asylum had suddenly emerged as a darling of the post-grunge pop scene. Fueled by the rootsy, accessible Top 5 single "Runaway Train," the group's album "Grave Dancers Union" rose steadily to the multimillion sales level.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1997 | Steve Hochman
A rock act writes a song about runaway kids and makes an accompanying video that shows photos of real runaways--several of whom see it and are moved to make contact with their parents and ultimately return home. Sound familiar? Sure, that's the true story around Soul Asylum's 1993 hit "Runaway Train." It's also the scenario of the NBC-TV movie "Born Into Exile," which airs March 17.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1996 | SARA SCRIBNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dan Murphy, guitarist for the rock band Soul Asylum, is as unaccustomed to playing love songs about pecan pie and Waffle House waitresses as he is to going unplugged. The normally high-voltage rocker is learning, though. "I'm discovering that I don't have to play loud to get my point across," Murphy says. "I don't have to bring a lot of amps to tour. I can pick up a mandolin every now and then and that works." No, Soul Asylum is not going bluegrass.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1996 | SARA SCRIBNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dan Murphy, guitarist for the rock band Soul Asylum, is as unaccustomed to playing love songs about pecan pie and Waffle House waitresses as he is to going unplugged. The normally high-voltage rocker is learning, though. "I'm discovering that I don't have to play loud to get my point across," Murphy says. "I don't have to bring a lot of amps to tour. I can pick up a mandolin every now and then, and that works." No, Soul Asylum is not going bluegrass.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Steve Hochman
STEPPING OUT: Nine months after leaving her job managing Hole, the Lemonheads and other bands to take an executive post at Atlantic Records, Janet Billig is moving back to management. Billig--who was often cited as an up-and-coming female leader in the record business--is said to be uncomfortable in the corporate setting and prefers working more directly with artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1992 | KATHERINE TURMAN
Two of America's up-and-coming purveyors of regular-guy garage-rock teamed up at the Palace Tuesday, where Soul Asylum and the Lemonheads faced off in a display of tour-till-you-drop music nurtured on blood, sweat and beers. Equal parts hope, cynicism and humor, Minneapolis' Soul Asylum's songs ran the gamut from the aggressive, hook-filled "Somebody to Shove" to the spare, midtempo "Nice Guys Don't Get Paid."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
Dave Pirner of Soul Asylum may howl like a wounded beast, but on the Minneapolis band's albums, at least, his raucous wailing is supported by coherent ideas. Often, Pirner's thinking concerns the psychic toll an individualist must pay when the prevailing attitude is go along to get along.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1995 | SANDY MASUO
Though it took Soul Asylum nearly 10 years to score a hit album, 1992's "Grave Dancer's Union," the quartet had long since established its reputation as a superior live band, having toured diligently since its inception in the same Minneapolis punk scene that produced such alternative-rock forerunners as the Replacements and Husker Du.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1995 | Richard Cromelin
The huge sales of Soul Asylum's 1993 album "Grave Dancer's Union" brought to a sudden end an era of struggle and slogging for the Minneapolis post-punk band, whose decade of hard touring and string of albums for the independent Twin/Tone and the major A&M had brought it a loyal but limited following. "Union," the quartet's first album on Columbia, included "Runaway Train," a ballad that made the Top 5 on the pop charts, paving the band's path into the mass audience.
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