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Soul Asylum Music Group

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1995 | Richard Cromelin
The huge sales of Soul Asylum's 1993 album "Grave Dancer's Union" brought to a sudden end an era of struggle and slogging for the Minneapolis post-punk band, whose decade of hard touring and string of albums for the independent Twin/Tone and the major A&M had brought it a loyal but limited following. "Union," the quartet's first album on Columbia, included "Runaway Train," a ballad that made the Top 5 on the pop charts, paving the band's path into the mass audience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1995 | Richard Cromelin
The huge sales of Soul Asylum's 1993 album "Grave Dancer's Union" brought to a sudden end an era of struggle and slogging for the Minneapolis post-punk band, whose decade of hard touring and string of albums for the independent Twin/Tone and the major A&M had brought it a loyal but limited following. "Union," the quartet's first album on Columbia, included "Runaway Train," a ballad that made the Top 5 on the pop charts, paving the band's path into the mass audience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1990 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Because Soul Asylum emerged from the Minneapolis alternative rock scene during the mid-1980s, the group has most often found its work being measured against the resident gods of the movement: Husker Du and the Replacements. But with the Huskers three years buried and the Replacements reportedly having met the same fate, Soul Asylum now finds itself casting the shadow over the Twin Cities scene rather than toiling beneath it.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1993 | STEVE HOCHMAN, Steve Hochman writes about pop music for Calendar
In the sunbaked parking lot behind the stage of the Glen Helen Blockbuster Pavilion, Soul Asylum frontman Dave Pirner stands beside a beaming young Japanese woman. Pirner's familiar matted blond hair brushes against her head as her friend snaps a photo--a prized memento from a trip halfway around the world to see the band.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1988 | CARY DARLING
Most bands would be honored if session-slick producer Nile Rodgers, best known for the high-tech rhythmic gloss he's lent the likes of David Bowie and Duran Duran, just happened to drop by the studio for a visit. Soul Asylum--Minneapolis' highly regarded and highly melodic yet highly charged thrash-pop quartet, who headline the Roxy on Thursday and play as part of a Jesse Jackson benefit at the Palace on Friday--were merely amused.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1992 | GINA ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In its 10-year career, the Minneapolis band Soul Asylum released three albums on the independent label Twin/Tone and two on A&M before reaching a crisis point last January. Disappointed by the sales of ". . .And the Horse They Rode In On," the band suddenly severed its ties with its longtime manager as well as A&M. While this was going on, singer Dave Pirner suffered a broken eardrum during a high-decibel performance, seriously endangering his future as the leader of a very loud rock band.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1993 | STEVE HOCHMAN, Steve Hochman writes about pop music for Calendar
In the sunbaked parking lot behind the stage of the Glen Helen Blockbuster Pavilion, Soul Asylum frontman Dave Pirner stands beside a beaming young Japanese woman. Pirner's familiar matted blond hair brushes against her head as her friend snaps a photo--a prized memento from a trip halfway around the world to see the band.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1992 | GINA ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In its 10-year career, the Minneapolis band Soul Asylum released three albums on the independent label Twin/Tone and two on A&M before reaching a crisis point last January. Disappointed by the sales of ". . .And the Horse They Rode In On," the band suddenly severed its ties with its longtime manager as well as A&M. While this was going on, singer Dave Pirner suffered a broken eardrum during a high-decibel performance, seriously endangering his future as the leader of a very loud rock band.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1990 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Because Soul Asylum emerged from the Minneapolis alternative rock scene during the mid-1980s, the group has most often found its work being measured against the resident gods of the movement: Husker Du and the Replacements. But with the Huskers three years buried and the Replacements reportedly having met the same fate, Soul Asylum now finds itself casting the shadow over the Twin Cities scene rather than toiling beneath it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1988 | CARY DARLING
Most bands would be honored if session-slick producer Nile Rodgers, best known for the high-tech rhythmic gloss he's lent the likes of David Bowie and Duran Duran, just happened to drop by the studio for a visit. Soul Asylum--Minneapolis' highly regarded and highly melodic yet highly charged thrash-pop quartet, who headline the Roxy on Thursday and play as part of a Jesse Jackson benefit at the Palace on Friday--were merely amused.
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