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April 17, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
At the All Star Blues Festival Saturday night at the Olympic Auditorium, which was really an R&B show, a quintet of vets offered a stirring reminder of that sweet soul music as it once was--joyously passionate, euphoric, sad and raw, and far from the dehumanizing syrup that has infested the genre since the '80s. The lineup at the Olympic included no musical giants, but former hit-makers--such as Johnny Taylor, Tyrone Davis, Clarence G.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
The highlight of Sam Smith's recent two-night stint at Troubadour didn't happen during, “Latch,” his exuberant dance jam with UK electronic duo Disclosure which exploded onto British radio late last year. It came during the aching ballad, “Lay Me Down,” his first offering as a solo artist . Couples embraced, the glow of smartphones lit up the room and a few concertgoers even had to wipe tears. Without prompt, the crowd began to compete with Smith's effortless, R&B-inflected melisma during the song's chorus.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1988 | JONATHAN GOLD
There is a street-level counterculture in this country, and Tracy Chapman and Michelle Shocked don't have much to do with it. Call it thrash, call it speed metal, call it noise, the New Metal is what the Ramones were supposed to be: physical, massively popular music more concerned with moral values than with girls and party-all-night.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2013 | By August Brown
There's one second of sound on John Legend's new album, "Love in the Future," that sums up his current artistic mission. It's on the delicate, gloomy track "Asylum," and the sound is a snare drum. Or rather a blast of raw, percussive white noise that punctuates Legend's future-soul tale of a love "where we both go crazy. " "We were leaning toward progressive, cool samples with space and minimalism," Legend said. "How do you refresh a genre that's so traditional and classic?" Although Legend is an R&B artist indebted to Sam Cooke's pristine phrasing and white-shoe piano ballads, his "Love in the Future" sounds remarkably modern.
BOOKS
November 28, 1999 | BONO, Bono is the lead singer of the musical group U2. His essay will appear as the introduction to "The Pocket Canon" series edition of "The Book of Psalms," which will be published next month by Grove Press
Explaining belief has always been difficult. How do you explain a love and logic at the heart of the universe when the world is so out of whack? How about the poetic versus the actual truth found in the scriptures? Has free will got us crucified? And what about the dodgy characters who inhabit the tome, known as the Bible, who claim to hear the voice of God? You have to be interested, but is God? Explaining faith is impossible. . . . Vision over visibility. . . . Instinct over intellect. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1995 | CHEO H. COKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"This is ridiculous!" Michael Beardon, who has worked as Madonna's musical director, expresses his astonishment aloud as he watches the excitement build in the hours before show time at the Supper Club, a hot spot just half a block from the dazzle of Times Square. As a 15-year industry veteran, Beardon, 31, has seen his share of mob scenes, but he repeats his amazement over what is unfolding as recording artist D'Angelo makes his New York City club debut.
TRAVEL
July 6, 2003 | Jane Engle, Time Staff Writer
More than 25 years after one of the seminal producers of soul music shut its doors, a museum celebrating the genre has risen on its site in Memphis, Tenn. The Stax Museum of American Soul Music, which opened in May, is at 926 E. McLemore Ave., where Stax Records spun out more than 160 Top 100 hits from 1960 to 1975, recorded by Otis Redding, Isaac Hayes, Sam & Dave, Rufus Thomas and other artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1995 | Richard Cromelin, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar
Onstage at LunaPark in West Hollywood, the diminutive, short-haired Dionne Farris resembles an elfin creature as she crouches and traces shapes in the air with her fingers in response to her band's music, an eclectic blend that spins out in several directions from its R&B foundation. Opening the soul ballad "Passion," Farris floats her voice atop warm currents of airy, folk-style guitar picking.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2013 | By August Brown
There's one second of sound on John Legend's new album, "Love in the Future," that sums up his current artistic mission. It's on the delicate, gloomy track "Asylum," and the sound is a snare drum. Or rather a blast of raw, percussive white noise that punctuates Legend's future-soul tale of a love "where we both go crazy. " "We were leaning toward progressive, cool samples with space and minimalism," Legend said. "How do you refresh a genre that's so traditional and classic?" Although Legend is an R&B artist indebted to Sam Cooke's pristine phrasing and white-shoe piano ballads, his "Love in the Future" sounds remarkably modern.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1988
I'd like to ask Jonathan Gold's permission to enjoy Metallica's "soul music," since I'm black. PETER SMITH Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Having already dominated the Grammy Awards, late-night television and the Billboard 200, Justin Timberlake rode his rolling promotional juggernaut to the White House on Tuesday night, taking part in an all-star tribute to Memphis soul along with Mavis Staples, Booker T. Jones and Queen Latifah, among others. And, yes, he wore his suit and tie . The invite-only concert, to be broadcast April 16 on PBS, was the latest installment in a series of "In Performance at the White House" events that have seen President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama celebrate country music, Motown and the work of Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
One of the more welcome (if lower-key) acts on the recently announced bill for this spring's Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival is James Blake, the young English fellow whose self-titled 2011 debut laid out a convincing vision of post-dubstep soul music. After spending much of 2012 out of sight, Blake will return to the American stage when he launches a month-long U.S. tour at Coachella on April 14. He'll have new tunes with him too: On Monday, Blake released the first single from his upcoming sophomore album, "Overgrown," due out in this country on April 9. The song is called "Retrograde," which seems accurate enough in that it sticks pretty closely to what made Blake's debut so special: gauzy keyboards, delicate falsetto, percussion that feels pared to the bare essentials.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
There are two works that illustrate the range of Fontella Bass' singing power. One is a gut-busting soul cry, “Rescue Me,” a propellant R&B banger from 1965 that became Bass' signature. The other, equally vital, is a nine-minute thrill ride, “Theme de Yoyo,” which drives funk and boundary-busting jazz through one instrumental climax after another on the classic 1970 album “Les Stances a Sophie” from the Art Ensemble of Chicago. Any appreciation of Bass, who died at 72 in her hometown of St. Louis on Wednesday, must first acknowledge these two pieces of music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Smokey Robinson refers to himself on his Twitter feed as "Singer, Poet, Philanthropist. " But when Pop & Hiss reached the soul-music legend Monday morning shortly before a rehearsal for his two-night stand this weekend at the Hollywood Bowl, we also found him to be sentimental, worldly and a prodigious user of first names. Forty years ago today, you played your final show with the Miracles in Washington, D.C. Does that seem like another lifetime to you now? It does and it doesn't, Mikael.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2011 | By Rachel B. Levin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Since she was a teenager, Long Beach resident Darma Elofson has considered herself a mod, part of a stylish subculture with roots in 1960s Britain that set itself apart from motorcycle-jacket-clad rockers. The mod revival that surged stateside and across the Pond in the late 1970s and early '80s introduced devotees like Elofson to its tenets of soul music, Italian scooters, and — above all — sharp dressing. "Typically, as a mod, your shirt would be buttoned up," she says. "It's a clean-cut kind of thing, nice and neat, '60s style.
TRAVEL
July 28, 2011
HOPLAND, CALIF. Mendocino County Fair Wine Competition When, where: Aug. 5, Jeriko Estate Winery Highlights: For the 35th year, vintners and experts gather to determine the wine region's best. In addition to the juried tasting competition, there's a farm-to-table dinner featuring the winning vintages. Cost: $75, including the farm-to-table dinner Info: (707) 468-9886, http://www.mendocinowinecompetition.com BIG BEAR Big Bear Air Fair When, where : Aug. 6, Big Bear City Airport Highlights: A family-friendly celebration of all things aviation includes up-close inspections of vintage warbirds and a sneak peek at the latest technologies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1992 | ELENA OUMANO and Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent).
* * * Whycliffe, "Rough Side," MCA. This debut album suggests that English kids value American soul music more than we do. Whycliffe unabashedly sings his heart out on 12 original songs that re-envision the history of Stateside soul from Jackie Wilson, Smokey Robinson and Marvin Gaye, through Isaac Hayes to Prince.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2010 | Valerie J. Nelson and Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times
Solomon Burke, a pioneering singer-songwriter of so-called sweet soul music whose powerful ballads in the 1960s were a major influence on a generation of rock, R&B and pop vocalists, has died. He was in his early 70s. Burke died early Sunday morning of natural causes at an Amsterdam airport, his family announced on his website . He had flown there from Los Angeles for a concert. "He was the founding father of what was defined as soul music in America in the 1960s. He was a major player," Tom Reed, author of the 1992 book "The Black Music History of Los Angeles: Its Roots," told The Times on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | Sophia Lee
Tena Clark has written and produced hit songs for Dionne Warwick, LeAnn Rimes and Patti LaBelle, been nominated for a Grammy Award ("Way Up There"), founded a company called DMI Music and Media Solutions, and written jingles for McDonald's. But she says none of those successes compare to her current undertaking, writing the songs for a new American musical, "Twist," which opens next week at the Pasadena Playhouse. The work is an adaptation of Charles Dickens' "Oliver Twist" set in Depression-era New Orleans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2010 | Valerie J. Nelson and Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times
Solomon Burke, a pioneering singer-songwriter of so-called sweet soul music whose powerful ballads in the 1960s were a major influence on a generation of rock, R&B and pop vocalists, has died. He was in his early 70s. Burke died early Sunday morning of natural causes at an Amsterdam airport, his family announced on his website . He had flown there from Los Angeles for a concert. "He was the founding father of what was defined as soul music in America in the 1960s. He was a major player," Tom Reed, author of the 1992 book "The Black Music History of Los Angeles: Its Roots," told The Times on Sunday.
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