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Sound Advance Systems

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BUSINESS
July 23, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The folks at Sound Advance Systems in Santa Ana say their "invisible" speakers are the best thing in consumer electronics since the woofer met the tweeter. The speakers, which are only three inches thick, can be disguised as paintings or built into a wall or ceiling. Aimed at the audiophile, they are what the 44-employee company hopes will set it apart from hundreds of other speaker manufacturers around the world.
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BUSINESS
June 1, 1993 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Hearing but Not Seeing: Sound Advance Systems, a division of Bertagni Electronic Sound Transducers in Santa Ana, said it has won a contract to install its "invisible" speakers in 111 homes being built in the Irvine Co. Newport Coast development. The speakers, three inches thick, can be disguised as paintings or built into walls or ceilings. They can be covered with ceiling tiles, wallpaper or paint without a noticeable reduction in sound quality, according to the company.
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BUSINESS
June 1, 1993 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Hearing but Not Seeing: Sound Advance Systems, a division of Bertagni Electronic Sound Transducers in Santa Ana, said it has won a contract to install its "invisible" speakers in 111 homes being built in the Irvine Co. Newport Coast development. The speakers, three inches thick, can be disguised as paintings or built into walls or ceilings. They can be covered with ceiling tiles, wallpaper or paint without a noticeable reduction in sound quality, according to the company.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The folks at Sound Advance Systems in Santa Ana say their "invisible" speakers are the best thing in consumer electronics since the woofer met the tweeter. The speakers, which are only three inches thick, can be disguised as paintings or built into a wall or ceiling. Aimed at the audiophile, they are what the 44-employee company hopes will set it apart from hundreds of other speaker manufacturers around the world.
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