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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2001 | PETER H. KING
Somewhere along the way, America changed. No longer was it a nation. It was a television show. Citizens no longer were citizens. They were actors, waiting in the wings to play their parts. Tragedies--a young woman gone missing, say--no more were mere tragedies. They were television serials, complete with casts, iconic images and titles: "Vanished." Public discourse in the television nation often tended to revolve around a single theme: Whodunit? Whodunit in Brentwood?
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NATIONAL
January 5, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Congress comes back to session this week with leaders of both parties planning a war of words in 2014 - dueling agendas that promise little substantive legislation but lots of messages aimed at establishing clear contrasts for voters heading toward the midterm election. After they dispatch a few must-pass fiscal measures early in the year, legislators seem unlikely to put together major accomplishments. Rather, the Republican-led House and the Democratic-controlled Senate will essentially become something like sound stages for the advertising wars that will unfold in the handful of states and districts that could decide partisan control of the next Congress.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1997
In one of several construction projects triggered by the explosive growth of the local entertainment industry, a 27-acre junkyard in Sun Valley has been leased for conversion into 16 sound stages for film production. Sam Adlen, owner of Aadlen Bros. Auto Wrecking, signed over all of his Sun Valley property to a group of investors last month, according to Jerry Martinez, Aadlen manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, Abby Sewell and Richard Verrier
A sprawling Santa Clarita Valley landscape that Walt Disney selected decades ago to be the backdrop for his movies and television shows will be transformed into one of the largest new studio developments in more than a decade under a plan approved Tuesday by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. Disney's Golden Oak Ranch will include more than 500,000 square feet of studio space, multiple sound stages, writers' bungalows, a commissary and other developments spread over 58 acres of oak-studded land in Placerita Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
Continuing a $10-million expansion at its west San Fernando Valley production facilities, Ray Art Studios opened a sixth sound stage Thursday. Ray Art specializes in renting sound stages for television productions but also hosts feature film productions. In addition, the studio is producing a series of its own productions for theatrical, cable and network release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State job safety and air quality officials are investigating allegations of illegal asbestos work at Universal City Studios, where film production crews say they have endured clouds of irritating dust during earthquake repairs to asbestos-containing buildings. The investigations by the South Coast Air Quality Management District and state Division of Occupational Safety and Health stem from complaints about demolition of sound stage walls that in some cases contain asbestos insulation.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cavernous hangar where B-1 bombers were once assembled, filmmakers have re-created a Midwestern town and plunged it into millions of gallons of water for the motion picture "The Flood." The locale is a long way from the Paramount Pictures lot in Hollywood, but the movie's producers say there's no way the mammoth production could fit in the studio's sound stages. Nor would there be room at any other studio in Hollywood, for that matter.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2000 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New sound stages are in the works for the Santa Clarita Valley and downtown Los Angeles as demand for state-of-the-art filming facilities remains healthy across Los Angeles County. The latest sound stages, however, are expected to put more pressure on outdated facilities that have failed to modernize, industry observers say. "The new facilities that come online with state-of-the-art features . . .
NEWS
November 26, 1996 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to an unprecedented demand for TV and film studio space caused by Hollywood's latest production boom, the investment company of Disney scion Roy E. Disney said Monday that it will build 14 sound stages in Manhattan Beach, creating one of the entertainment industry's largest independent production facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1997 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to satisfy the growing demand for studio space, a Swiss developer and a Los Angeles architecture firm plan to build a $150-million production facility in Culver City, yet another sign of the entertainment industry's steady march to the Westside. The plans for New Studio, on a 12.25-acre site at Slauson Avenue and the eastern end of the Marina Freeway, include 12 sound stages, production offices, craft shops, a 400-room hotel and restaurant and a rooftop movie theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
In his newest Hollywood role, Sid Ganis has gone from promoting the Oscars to pitching a sprawling film studio complex in China. In an interview, the former president of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences predicted that Wuxi Studio outside of Shanghai will become a magnet for Hollywood productions within a few years. "It took 100 years for our industry to evolve and our studios to be working at full capacity," said Ganis, a consultant and honorary chairman for Wuxi.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
A half-century ago, Walt Disney leased a horse ranch in Placerita Canyon to shoot episodes of “The Adventures of Spin and Marty” from the classic ABC series “The Mickey Mouse Club.” Disney liked the property, with its rich variety of meadows, oak groves and mountains, so much that he began buying up land, eventually accumulating 890 acres. Over the decades, the storied Golden Oak Ranch, located in an unincorporated area of northeast Los Angeles County, has been used as backdrop for countless Disney TV shows and movies, including “Old Yeller” and “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End.”  Now Walt Disney Co. is moving closer to transforming part of the historic movie ranch into one of the largest high-tech production developments in the last decade - and the public will soon get its first say on the project.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Paramount Pictures Corp. unveiled plans Tuesday for $700 million in improvements including new sound stages and offices for its storied Hollywood lot. About 1.4 million square feet of development would take place over the next two decades at Paramount's Melrose Avenue headquarters and some adjacent properties owned by the company, if city officials approve. "We have run out of options for creating more production space," said Frederick Huntsberry, Paramount's chief operating officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2011 | By Mikael Wood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Two years ago Paul Simon traveled to Kenya with his wife, the singer Edie Brickell, and their three children. The trip wasn't strictly musical: "We went to see the migration of the animals," Simon says. But fans of this Rock and Roll Hall of Famer have known about his interest in African sounds since 1986, when he set a new benchmark for globally oriented pop with the Grammy-winning "Graceland. " No surprise, then, that Brickell used a small digital recorder to make a sort of audio diary of their journey.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2011
"M-G-M: Hollywood's Greatest Backlot," a new coffee-table book from Steven Bingen, Stephen X. Sylvester and Michael Troyan, offers a nostalgic look at the sound stages and expansive outdoor sets of the famed Culver City studio that boasted of having more stars than are in the heavens. Besides interviews with folks who worked there ? including a foreword by Debbie Reynolds ? the book features hundreds of rare photographs that illustrate MGM's status as the dream factory. According to the authors, it's been estimated that one-fifth of the films made in Hollywood before 1970 were at least partly shot at the studio.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
On-location filming in Los Angeles was flat in the third quarter, remaining virtually unchanged from the same period a year ago. The stagnant performance was widely anticipated and largely blamed on the waning effect of the state's film tax credits on local production. After a 16% jump in activity in the second quarter, on-location production rose just 0.3% during the three months that ended Sept. 30, according to data released by FilmL.A., the nonprofit group that handles film permits for the city and unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Growth of the entertainment industry in Los Angeles continues to transform warehouse districts and vacant buildings. Now, a developer is hoping to bring some of those changes to downtown L.A. Los Angeles-based Smith & Hricik Development Co. has filed permit applications to develop the area around the former Unocal Corp. headquarters on 5th Street, just west of the Harbor Freeway, into sound stages. The plan calls for the 40-year-old, 14-story Unocal building to remain intact.
NEWS
November 23, 1996 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cavernous Palmdale hangar where B-1 bombers were once assembled, filmmakers have re-created a Midwestern town and plunged it into millions of gallons of water for the motion picture "The Flood." The locale is a long way from the Paramount Pictures lot in Hollywood, but the movie's producers say there is no way the mammoth production could fit in the studio's sound stages. Nor would there be room at any other studio in Hollywood, for that matter.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2009 | By Richard Verrier
New Mexico is determined to stay in the Hollywood limelight. Much to the chagrin of California, New Mexico has emerged as a major draw for movies and TV shows in recent years. Credit a generous 25% film production rebate, favorable climate and an aggressive film office. Now the state that bills itself as "Hollywood's Newest Home" is ratcheting up the competition. With the support of a $10-million economic development grant from the state, developers are about to break ground on a major production studio just outside Santa Fe, the state's capital.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2009 | Richard Verrier
Raleigh Studios is building a new studio complex, but you won't be able to get there on the 101. The Hollywood-based company, the largest independent studio operator in the U.S., runs studios in Hollywood, Manhattan Beach and Louisiana, and now is expanding in a big way into Eastern Europe. The company is set to open nine sound stages totaling 180,907 square feet on the outskirts of Budapest, Hungary, this spring to take advantage of the country's low-cost labor and film tax credits.
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