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Sound Walls

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1988 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
A group of North Hollywood homeowners formed a coalition Thursday night to push for the construction of freeway sound walls in their community. About 125 residents who live within the roar of the Ventura and Hollywood freeways complained that life near the fast lanes brings constant noise, pollution and dust into their homes. Many residents said freeway drivers pull to the shoulder and burglarize their homes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
A grassy 30-acre park opened in the port community of Wilmington on Saturday, prompting cheers from residents who had successfully blocked the construction of a gigantic sound wall that they feared would hem them in from the sea. Instead of building a mile-long, 20-foot-high barrier to serve as a buffer between homes and the rows of cargo containers and cranes at the Port of Los Angeles, port officials ended up constructing the $55-million Wilmington...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1988
For some time I have been house hunting in the San Fernando Valley. I remember one house in particular in Toluca Lake, a very desirable area. It was good sized, well appointed, and very attractively priced. Why? Well, it was located smack-dab against the Ventura Freeway. And it was noisy. But, as the agent pointed out, the price reflected that. And this area is scheduled for sound walls, which will raise the value $50,000 immediately. There was no doubt in my mind that she was right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2011 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Whenever he drives past the Los Angeles National Cemetery, Bill Hutton silently reflects on the thousands of precisely placed white grave markers and remembers his own close calls while serving in Vietnam. He also hears the noise from cars roaring by on the 405 Freeway just feet from Sepulveda Boulevard, which runs along the cemetery's west side. He finds it perplexing that transportation engineers have not planned a sound wall as part of the ongoing freeway-widening project. "National cemeteries are sacred to our vets who have given so much for our country," said Hutton, 63, of Thousand Oaks, the thrice-wounded national senior vice commander for the Military Order of the Purple Heart.
NEWS
September 18, 1986
The Norwalk City Council has allocated $60,000 to begin engineering work for several sound walls along the Santa Ana Freeway. Only five segments of the freeway will be included at this time because the state Department of Transportation may widen the interstate route in the future. The sound walls, originally planned for construction in 1989, could be in place as early as a year from now, said Larry Cheeves, assistant public works director.
NEWS
August 28, 1986
After receiving a petition from 150 residents, the City Council voted to move up by one year the date to build sound walls on the Santa Ana Freeway between Norwalk Boulevard and Imperial Highway. The council requested that a study be brought back in two weeks detailing the costs for building four miles of sound walls. The city had originally scheduled to pay for design costs in fiscal 1986-88, with construction to begin in 1989. The city would later be reimbursed by the state.
NEWS
April 5, 1992
The Arcadia Sound Wall Committee will hold a political forum featuring City Council candidates today. The meeting will also feature an update on progress in getting sound walls to diminish freeway noise. It will be at 3 p.m. in the garden at 311 N. 4th Ave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
Residents living along sections of the Ventura, Hollywood and San Diego freeways will get the chance to sound off about sound walls at an informational community meeting tonight. California Department of Transportation officials will be on hand to answer residents' questions regarding sound-wall construction along the Ventura Freeway between the Hollywood and San Diego freeway interchange and Hollywood Way, an area that includes portions of North Hollywood, Valley Village and Toluca Lake.
NEWS
April 9, 1992
Residents may be allowed to build their own sound barriers if they live near Citrus Avenue, where a commuter rail station will be constructed. Under the city's proposal, homeowners will be allowed to build 10-foot walls on the side of their properties nearest the railroad tracks. But the City Council on Tuesday continued the vote on the matter until after the new council is seated after Tuesday's election.
NEWS
December 11, 1986
The City Council last week awarded a $1.2-million contract to Los Angeles-based Modern Alloys to build the final 1/2-mile stretch of freeway sound walls in the city. The 14-foot-high wall will be built behind homes on Brookhaven Avenue on the south side of the Artesia Freeway between 183rd Street and Carmenita Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2010 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
The Sunset Boulevard bridge is ready for its close-up. After weeks of preparation, construction crews Friday night will shut down portions of busy Sunset Boulevard and the 405 Freeway on the Westside to begin jackhammering and demolishing the southern half of the bridge. Workers will then spend 10 months rebuilding it before going through the same drill on the bridge's northern half. Transportation officials have met regularly with neighbors and businesses, sent e-mail blasts and communicated via Twitter and Facebook to keep them apprised of closures and detours.
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | Thomas J. Sheeran, Associated Press
The soundproofing walls that increasingly line highways, especially in densely populated areas, often have a brooding look. But transportation planners are beginning to borrow an idea from Europe to make the freeway corridor more livable: see-through sound walls. Such walls, erected on the south side of Interstate 71 in a blue-collar Cleveland neighborhood, will give the new home of St. Paul AME Church a window on the 90,000 vehicles passing daily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Yorba Linda man was killed early Wednesday when his car crashed into a concrete barrier on the Riverside Freeway, officials said. Richard Trimper, 36, was pronounced dead at the scene of the midnight crash. Authorities said he was driving west on the freeway near Euclid Street when his car went off the road and struck a sound wall. The car then ricocheted and slammed into the center divider. It was raining at the time of the crash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2004 | Sharon Bernstein, Times Staff Writer
The warning bells on the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Gold Line trains would quiet down considerably through South Pasadena under a proposed settlement of noise complaints that won preliminary approval this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Work began Wednesday on almost $500 million in improvements to the heavily congested Garden Grove Freeway, which has not been substantially upgraded or widened since it opened 37 years ago. The Orange County Transportation Authority wants to remake a 12-mile stretch of the freeway, from its eastern end, at the Costa Mesa Freeway, to Valley View Street near its junction with the San Diego Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2003 | Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writer
Anaheim residents have been waiting for this Christmas present for more than a decade. City officials announced Wednesday that Caltrans and the Federal Highway Administration have authorized a sound wall alongside railroad tracks that run along the Anaheim-Yorba Linda border. The wall has been the focus of a decadelong dispute between the neighboring cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2003 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
The state budget crisis hit home Thursday for freeway neighbors in San Bernardino County after the California Transportation Commission voted to divert money from four sound-wall projects to help pay for a freeway widening in Redlands. The vote by the commission, meeting in Santa Ana, is the latest example of belt tightening by state transportation officials since Gov. Gray Davis announced in December plans to cut nearly $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2003 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
In South Gate, the owner of a mobile home abutting the Long Beach Freeway nailed a layer of drywall to the back of his home to muffle the incessant freeway din that keeps him awake. In Claremont, a man who lives a quarter-mile from the newly expanded Foothill Freeway has tried sleeping with earplugs to drown out the roadway racket.
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