Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSound Walls
IN THE NEWS

Sound Walls

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2001 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Yorba Linda wanted to transform part of its border with Anaheim into what could become a graffiti-strewn eyesore, local officials say they would be hard-pressed to beat the $12.5-million plan their neighbor to the south has cooked up. Homeowners are usually grateful for a sound wall. But this is no ordinary sound wall. It would be a towering metal presence along 2 1/2 miles of federal land that separates the cities.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2001
Weary residents who live next to San Diego County's busy freeways--and have to put up with the steady noise--might get some relief. The San Diego Assn. of Governments has approved a $2-million program to build sound walls along freeways in communities that have the loudest traffic. According to a ranking of needs compiled by Caltrans in 1997, Oceanside had six of the top nine projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2001
Residents who summon the will to fight city hall and keep after distant bureaucrats require a special kind of resolve and patience. Few can carry on a fight for decades, while they endure a prolonged inconvenience. There have been many decibels of passing traffic noise heard since residents along the Garden Grove Freeway began complaining during the Nixon administration about what they were putting up with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looks like 80-year-old Lois Gergen of Garden Grove won't need her decibel meter from Radio Shack anymore. Corinne and Tim Brubaker, who live across the street, will finally be able to open the front windows of their home. And it soon will be possible, after more than three decades, for all of them to have a conversation outside without shouting at each other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looks as if 80-year-old Lois Gergen of Garden Grove won't need her decibel meter from Radio Shack any more. Corinne and Tim Brubaker, who live across the street, will finally be able to open the front windows of their home. And it soon will be possible, after more than three decades, for all of them to have a conversation outside without shouting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
An open house to discuss a series of sound walls that will help block freeway noise from homes along California 126 is scheduled tonight at a local grade school. Residents interested in the project can talk with Caltrans officials and review displays of the wall from 6 to 8 p.m. at Juanamaria Elementary School, 100 S. Crocker Ave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001
Re "Getting an Earful," Feb. 5. Thanks to Gov. Gray Davis' actions, sound walls that had been on hold for a decade are finally coming to numerous noise-impacted areas in Los Angeles County. Under the split between state and local funding, sound walls are normally addressed through the regional transportation program. However, because of the L.A. MTA's [Metropolitan Transportation Authority's] inability to fund the 1989 program, Davis worked to secure state funding for these 42 projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a small stretch of Screenland Drive next to the Ventura Freeway, a rusty chain link fence is the only barrier between Dan Zappin's house and the speeding cars. "It's tough to sleep," said Zappin, 25, who has lived in the house for one year. "And if we go out . . . we have to yell to talk to one another." Zappin and his neighbors may be yelling for a few more years. He lives in an area that has been promised a sound wall since 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a small stretch of Screenland Drive next to the Ventura Freeway in Burbank, a rusty chain link fence is the only barrier between Dan Zappin's house and the speeding cars. "It's tough to sleep," said Zappin, 25, who has lived in the house for one year. "And if we go out . . . we have to yell to talk to one another." Zappin and his neighbors may be yelling for a few more years. He lives in an area that has been promised a sound wall since 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2001 | CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents in Simi Valley and Thousand Oaks will likely get relief from the roar of freeway traffic near their homes after a county commission votes today on how to distribute $10 million to build sound walls. The two east county cities are expected to receive the bulk of the state and federal money because freeway noise is among the worst there, according to noise readings, and because the cities have the money to help pay for the walls.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|