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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
This post has been updated. See below for details. Last week, news that a live-action film version of "Jem and the Holograms" was in the works sent fans of the cartoon series and Hasbro's line of dolls into an online frenzy. But one person not so excited about the reboot? The creator and head writer of the original series. Christy Marx, creator of the “Jem” series, said that she was not only shut out of the reboot but also learned about the film's development a few days before its YouTube announcement.
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NATIONAL
March 22, 2014 | By Steve Padilla
Rescuers searching a Washington state community devastated by a deadly mudslide said Saturday night that they had heard signs of life coming from the debris and would continue searching even as the danger of flooding rose. “We'll be here all night long doing what we can to rescue people,” Snohomish County Sheriff Ty Trenary said. Trenary, speaking at a televised news conference, did not specify what kinds of sounds had been detected. He said the search had been made difficult by the sheer devastation to the area about 40 miles north of Seattle.
SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
SAN DIEGO - No Duke here. No Ohio State anywhere. And no, giggle, not even a hint of New Mexico. At the late-night end of two NCAA tournament opening days filled with higher seeds laying giant eggs, UCLA finished Friday's madness with a simple, dominating march. The Bruins stomped through fears a talented fourth seed would overlook a pesky 13th-seed, trampled worries their new coach couldn't win a tournament opener, and even flattened a 20-year-old nightmare with a 76-59 victory over Tulsa.
OPINION
March 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Income inequality, persistent poverty and the lack of economic mobility are not only some of the most salient political issues of 2014 but are fundamental challenges that affect the prosperity of the country and the stability of our communities. About 25% of families with children in the city of Los Angeles live in poverty, according to the Census Bureau. And even many people whose earnings exceed the federal poverty line struggle to make ends meet. Nearly half of all workers in Los Angeles earn less than $15 an hour, which some advocates for the poor believe is the minimum necessary to afford basic housing, food and transportation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
On announcing the death last week of composer Robert Ashley in New York at 83, the composer and critic Kyle Gann wrote on his blog that Ashley was "the greatest genius of 20th-century opera. I don't know how long it's going to take the world to recognize that. " I think I do. A little while, but not too much longer. Let's not argue about the greatest genius of opera in the 20th century. It's enough that Ashley was one of the greats and a true pioneer. Some might even want to argue about Ashley's lack of recognition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
An Oscar, whether it is for lead actress or for makeup and hair, weighs exactly the same (8.5 pounds). A win in production design represents a level of achievement in a craft on par with best director. The night for all the winners is just as golden - same stars overhead. Yet there is a different, dimmer spotlight on the below-the-line contenders. Their red carpet walk will go unnoted, their gowns and tuxedo flair overlooked and their heartfelt speeches mostly unremembered or rudely cut short.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Scott Sandell
Some Oscar categories don't get much respect. Cinematography and sound editing are vital to any film, but many critics say the TV show could do without the presentation of these awards and their behind-the-scenes brethren. That said, the Academy Awards wouldn't be the same if we didn't have to consider who did the visual effects for "Gravity" or the hair and makeup for "Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa. " After the Oscars start to unfold at 5:30 p.m. Pacific on Sunday, check back for live updates of the winners in the following eight categories: cinematography, costume design, film editing, makeup and hairstyling, production design, sound editing, sound mixing and visual effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
Growing up, Christopher Navarro used to listen to himself talking on a hand-me-down Kmart cassette tape recorder, then re-record his voice until he had perfected the audio clip. Now 38, the Northern California native channels his childhood pastime in his career as an automatic dialogue replacement mixer, meaning he re-records dialogue by actors in a sound studio during post-production. Though his name won't be read among the official Oscar nominees this Sunday, the ADR mixer for Audio Head and the Formosa Group has his work in four of the nine best picture contenders: "Gravity," "12 Years a Slave," "Her" and "The Wolf of Wall Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Kevin Bronson
Not two hours after he performed his passion project in an 88-seat theater on a recent Sunday night, Ross Golan made the rounds at a Grammy after-party hosted by Daft Punk, smiling as Jay Z and Beyoncé glided by and making nice with Madonna and Skrillex and Pharrell Williams. Inhabiting either world would have been inconceivable five years ago to Golan, whose first rock band had failed, whose second was flailing and whose days were spent toiling in his condo. Which was in foreclosure.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Beck made his name as a recycler, a smart, savvy searcher known for finding new value in old things. So it makes sense that the artist responsible for "Mellow Gold" and "Odelay," both high points of mid-'90s cut-and-paste pop, would eventually get around to recycling himself. That's more or less what Beck does on his latest album, "Morning Phase. " With the same downbeat acoustic vibe and many of the same players, the new record serves as a kind of spiritual sequel - a "companion piece," his camp calls it - to 2002's "Sea Change," on which the singer broke from his established collage aesthetic to offer up a dozen slow-and-low folk songs about the pain of heartache.
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