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July 10, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Performance rights organization SoundExchange distributed $149 million to music artists and record labels in the second quarter of 2013, a 55% increase from the same period a year ago.  SoundExchange, which collects royalties from services including satellite and Internet radio, said the quarter's payments represent a record for the organization, underscoring the increasing popularity of those services.   The organization also said its administrative rate was 4.9% in 2012, which it said is one of the lowest in the world.  PHOTOS: Highest-paid media executives of 2012 “SoundExchange's most recent distribution is yet another positive indication of where the industry is heading," Chief Executive Michael Huppe said in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Performance rights organization SoundExchange distributed $149 million to music artists and record labels in the second quarter of 2013, a 55% increase from the same period a year ago.  SoundExchange, which collects royalties from services including satellite and Internet radio, said the quarter's payments represent a record for the organization, underscoring the increasing popularity of those services.   The organization also said its administrative rate was 4.9% in 2012, which it said is one of the lowest in the world.  PHOTOS: Highest-paid media executives of 2012 “SoundExchange's most recent distribution is yet another positive indication of where the industry is heading," Chief Executive Michael Huppe said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2010 | By Alex Pham
When John Boydston got an e-mail from SoundExchange saying he had several thousand dollars in unclaimed royalties, he did what most sensible people would do. He ignored it. To the rock musician from Atlanta, "money for nothing" meant a song by Dire Straits, not a stranger contacting him out of the blue promising to cut him big checks. But then he got the message again six months later. Curious, he called SoundExchange. "Sure enough, they had a sizable amount of money for me," said Boydston, 51, whose band Daddy a Go Go includes his two teenage sons.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Alex Pham
This post was not written by a Nigerian prince. SoundExchange, a nonprofit group that collects digital music royalties on behalf of artists, on Wednesday said that around 50,000 musicians have unclaimed money with the group totaling more than $31 million. The amounts range from $10 to $100,000 per artist or label, the group said.  Those who want to see if a check is waiting for them should visit SoundExchange and check the database . Among the names listed are Mark Wahlberg's hip-hop band Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, The Smith Westerns and Joaquin Phoenix.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2006
Regarding "Digital Music Royalty Checks Languish," Sept. 29: As music professionals who represent hundreds of thousands of recording artists -- and who make up 50% of SoundExchange's board of directors -- we were glad to see The Times raise awareness of our recently published list of unpaid artists. We would, however, like to clear up several misperceptions. The article's assertion that SoundExchange can't find certain high-profile artists included on the list is incorrect. A number of these artists simply have failed to respond to our notifications -- indeed, Dixie Chicks manager Simon Renshaw indicated as much in your piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Alex Pham
This post was not written by a Nigerian prince. SoundExchange, a nonprofit group that collects digital music royalties on behalf of artists, on Wednesday said that around 50,000 musicians have unclaimed money with the group totaling more than $31 million. The amounts range from $10 to $100,000 per artist or label, the group said.  Those who want to see if a check is waiting for them should visit SoundExchange and check the database . Among the names listed are Mark Wahlberg's hip-hop band Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, The Smith Westerns and Joaquin Phoenix.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
As Joe Kennedy fights against the Internet radio royalties that he says could kill his online music service, the Pandora chief executive carries a weapon: a Stiletto. Not the old-fashioned, sharpened-steel knife popular with hoodlums and mobsters. This is the high-tech Stiletto 100 Portable Satellite Radio from Sirius. Kennedy brandishes it when he meets with members of Congress to highlight what he calls the inequity of the royalty rates. The Stiletto has two antennas. One picks up Sirius' satellite signal, and the other connects via Wi-Fi.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2008 | Peter Whoriskey, The Washington Post
Pandora is one of the nation's most popular Web radio services, with about 1 million listeners daily. Its Music Genome Project allows customers to create stations tailored to their own tastes. It is one of the 10 most popular applications for Apple Inc.'s iPhone and attracts 40,000 new customers a day. Yet the burgeoning company may be on the verge of collapse, according to its founder, and so may others like it. "We're approaching a pull-the-plug kind of decision," said Tim Westergren, who founded Oakland-based Pandora.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
SoundExchange Inc., an organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, agreed with a group representing Internet broadcasters to cap fees at $50,000 a year per webcaster. The webcasters agreed to provide the agency with full data on songs broadcast, according to statements from SoundExchange and the Digital Media Assn., which represents the Web radio companies. The royalties are disbursed to the record labels and the artists.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2006 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Charles Duhigg, Times Staff Writers
Rapper Mos Def, producer T-Bone Burnett and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir have gone missing. The organization created by the recording industry to collect and distribute Internet and satellite radio royalties can't seem to find these and other artists to whom it owes checks.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2010 | By Alex Pham
When John Boydston got an e-mail from SoundExchange saying he had several thousand dollars in unclaimed royalties, he did what most sensible people would do. He ignored it. To the rock musician from Atlanta, "money for nothing" meant a song by Dire Straits, not a stranger contacting him out of the blue promising to cut him big checks. But then he got the message again six months later. Curious, he called SoundExchange. "Sure enough, they had a sizable amount of money for me," said Boydston, 51, whose band Daddy a Go Go includes his two teenage sons.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2008 | Peter Whoriskey, The Washington Post
Pandora is one of the nation's most popular Web radio services, with about 1 million listeners daily. Its Music Genome Project allows customers to create stations tailored to their own tastes. It is one of the 10 most popular applications for Apple Inc.'s iPhone and attracts 40,000 new customers a day. Yet the burgeoning company may be on the verge of collapse, according to its founder, and so may others like it. "We're approaching a pull-the-plug kind of decision," said Tim Westergren, who founded Oakland-based Pandora.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
As Joe Kennedy fights against the Internet radio royalties that he says could kill his online music service, the Pandora chief executive carries a weapon: a Stiletto. Not the old-fashioned, sharpened-steel knife popular with hoodlums and mobsters. This is the high-tech Stiletto 100 Portable Satellite Radio from Sirius. Kennedy brandishes it when he meets with members of Congress to highlight what he calls the inequity of the royalty rates. The Stiletto has two antennas. One picks up Sirius' satellite signal, and the other connects via Wi-Fi.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
SoundExchange Inc., an organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, agreed with a group representing Internet broadcasters to cap fees at $50,000 a year per webcaster. The webcasters agreed to provide the agency with full data on songs broadcast, according to statements from SoundExchange and the Digital Media Assn., which represents the Web radio companies. The royalties are disbursed to the record labels and the artists.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2006
Regarding "Digital Music Royalty Checks Languish," Sept. 29: As music professionals who represent hundreds of thousands of recording artists -- and who make up 50% of SoundExchange's board of directors -- we were glad to see The Times raise awareness of our recently published list of unpaid artists. We would, however, like to clear up several misperceptions. The article's assertion that SoundExchange can't find certain high-profile artists included on the list is incorrect. A number of these artists simply have failed to respond to our notifications -- indeed, Dixie Chicks manager Simon Renshaw indicated as much in your piece.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2006 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Charles Duhigg, Times Staff Writers
Rapper Mos Def, producer T-Bone Burnett and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir have gone missing. The organization created by the recording industry to collect and distribute Internet and satellite radio royalties can't seem to find these and other artists to whom it owes checks.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2000 | Reuters
The Recording Industry Assn. of America (RIAA) launched a collective to distribute royalties for streamed music online, but the group already has hit a sour note with some digital-media companies and artist groups. About 2,100 record labels and 270 recording companies will be represented by the group, called SoundExchange, which now awaits designation from the U.S. Copyright Office, said John Simson, executive director for SoundExchange.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera
The music won't stop for Internet radio after a group of webcasters struck an agreement with SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, over payments for playing music online. The settlement ends a 2 1/2 -year-old dispute that had threatened to silence the nascent Internet radio business and had forced some people who started online stations as a hobby to quit for fear of accruing expensive royalty bills. The deal is part of a series of agreements made this year that cover various sectors of the industry, including small webcasters and conventional radio stations that simulcast their broadcasts online, and have resolved much of the controversy.
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