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Soundexchange Organization

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BUSINESS
July 17, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
The songs remained the same on Internet radio Monday, as most stations continued to stream music while their representatives negotiated to lower a controversial royalty hike that took effect over the weekend. With talks progressing, SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, indicated to webcasters that it wouldn't seek immediate payment of the higher rates.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
The songs remained the same on Internet radio Monday, as most stations continued to stream music while their representatives negotiated to lower a controversial royalty hike that took effect over the weekend. With talks progressing, SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, indicated to webcasters that it wouldn't seek immediate payment of the higher rates.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals panel has declined to delay a substantial increase in royalties that Internet radio stations must pay for playing music, clearing the way for the rates to take effect Sunday. Webcasters had sought an emergency stay from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, arguing that the higher rates would drive many of them out of business.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera
The music won't stop for Internet radio after a group of webcasters struck an agreement with SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, over payments for playing music online. The settlement ends a 2 1/2 -year-old dispute that had threatened to silence the nascent Internet radio business and had forced some people who started online stations as a hobby to quit for fear of accruing expensive royalty bills. The deal is part of a series of agreements made this year that cover various sectors of the industry, including small webcasters and conventional radio stations that simulcast their broadcasts online, and have resolved much of the controversy.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera and Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writers
WASHINGTON -- Video killed the radio star, as the 1979 hit song goes, and now some fear an obscure group of federal copyright judges may be on the verge of killing Internet radio. In a ruling made public Tuesday, the Copyright Royalty Board significantly increased the royalties paid to musicians and record labels for streaming digital songs online. The decision also ended a discounted fee for small Internet broadcasters.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Every day was Christmas for Michael Clark, but now the holiday's over. From the attic of his condo in Woodbridge, Va., the 38-year-old Web developer ran an Internet radio station that spun his beloved Christmas carols all year long. Then in March, a panel of federal judges sharply increased the royalty charges for playing music online. Since then, it's been one long, silent night for Clark and his hundreds of listeners at christmasmusic247.com.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
As Joe Kennedy fights against the Internet radio royalties that he says could kill his online music service, the Pandora chief executive carries a weapon: a Stiletto. Not the old-fashioned, sharpened-steel knife popular with hoodlums and mobsters. This is the high-tech Stiletto 100 Portable Satellite Radio from Sirius. Kennedy brandishes it when he meets with members of Congress to highlight what he calls the inequity of the royalty rates. The Stiletto has two antennas. One picks up Sirius' satellite signal, and the other connects via Wi-Fi.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Across the Internet, the music will die today. It's a protest staged by online radio stations to preview what they say will happen when substantially higher royalty rates kick in next month, silencing for good stations that can't afford them. Thousands of webcasters will replace their music streams today with periods of silence and occasional messages about the dispute, urging people to press Congress to reverse the royalty rate and fee increase set by a federal board.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2008 | Peter Whoriskey, The Washington Post
Pandora is one of the nation's most popular Web radio services, with about 1 million listeners daily. Its Music Genome Project allows customers to create stations tailored to their own tastes. It is one of the 10 most popular applications for Apple Inc.'s iPhone and attracts 40,000 new customers a day. Yet the burgeoning company may be on the verge of collapse, according to its founder, and so may others like it. "We're approaching a pull-the-plug kind of decision," said Tim Westergren, who founded Oakland-based Pandora.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Clear Channel Media & Entertainment and Warner Music Group Corp., the world's third-largest record label, have entered a partnership that will let Warner promote music through the radio giant and take in revenue from terrestrial radio. The companies said Thursday that Warner will share in revenue from all of Clear Channel's platforms, including its 850 traditional radio stations and its Internet music service iHeartRadio . Financial details were not disclosed. Traditional AM and FM radio stations currently are not required to pay performance royalties, and record labels, including Warner, and artists are pushing for the U.S. government to establish a performance right that would allow labels and artists to make money from plays of songs on AM and FM stations.
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