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Soundproofing

NEWS
January 24, 1985
Burbank Airport officials this week joined Los Angeles and other cities in seeking state legislation to encourage residents living near airports to soundproof their homes. Airport officials said property owners now are discouraged from soundproofing their homes because doing so could mean higher property assessments and taxes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1998
About 100 city officials and residents inspected a newly soundproofed model home near Los Angeles International Airport's north runway Thursday. The public may visit the two-bedroom house in the 400 block of Waterview Street by appointment, said Nancy Niles, community relations director for the LAX residential soundproofing program. Niles said about 9,000 houses and apartments in Playa del Rey, Westchester and South Los Angeles are eligible for soundproofing at no cost to owners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1988 | TIM WATERS, Times Staff Writer
A little peace and quiet never came easy to Cecil McAllister and his family. Talk around the dinner table stopped and the TV's sound was cranked up each time a jet leaving Los Angeles International Airport roared over his El Segundo home. "Particularly in the summertime, if you left a window open or even if you didn't, you were drowned out by the noise," said McAllister, a retired sheet metal shop manager. "If you were having a conversation . . . you just stopped until it passed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995
Silence is golden, or in this case at least, green. El Segundo residents either will have to pay now for 20% of the cost to insulate their homes against the roaring noise of Los Angeles Airport, or wait in hopes that city and airport officials reach an agreement that would allow residents to pay nothing. But that could take years, said Harvey Holden, El Segundo's airport projects administrator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN
Burbank Airport officials accepted a $2-million federal grant Friday that will meet the conditions of a lawsuit settlement between the airport and the Los Angeles Unified School District. The grant, to be matched by $500,000 from the airport, will be used to soundproof and install air conditioning at Glenwood School, a Sun Valley elementary school at the end of the airport's north-south runway.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Workers will begin soundproofing classrooms this week at St. Bernard Parish School, where noise from the nearby Artesia Freeway has disrupted classes, given students headaches and made it nearly impossible for teachers to instruct. "After 1 p.m., when those prevailing winds rise from the south, they drive the noise right into the classrooms. It's just horrible," said parent Melissa Mosley, who has led the campaign to get soundproofing and a freeway sound wall to muffle the traffic noise.
NEWS
December 14, 1989
Caltrans officials this week said St. Bernard's Parish School, which for years has been engulfed in the drone of traffic on the Artesia (91) Freeway, is eligible for state-funded soundproofing of its classrooms. Caltrans sound-wall project engineer Bill Minter said preliminary tests of three classrooms at the school, which sits 500 feet north of the freeway in Bellflower, show that noise levels are four times higher than state limitations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1988 | TIM WATERS, Times Staff Writer
A little peace and quiet never came easy to Cecil McAllister and his family. Talk around the dinner table stopped and the TV's sound was cranked up each time a jet leaving Los Angeles International Airport roared over his El Segundo home. "Particularly in the summertime, if you left a window open or even if you didn't, you were drowned out by the noise," said McAllister, a retired sheet metal shop manager. "If you were having a conversation . . . you just stopped until it passed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1987 | JOHN NEEDHAM, Times County Bureau Chief
When Orange County offered Sandra Shambaugh $177,000 for her five-bedroom, three-bath home with pool, she took it. She wasn't happy about the price, but she needed the money. David Magnuson felt the county gave him a fair price for his home, $176,500, which was $11,000 more than he paid three years earlier. But he accused the county of reneging on its promise to pay $2,480 to cover "points" on a new mortgage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1988 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
Instead of requiring the city of Los Angeles to rezone residential neighborhoods around the Van Nuys Airport for industrial or commercial uses, the state believes insulating homes with sound buffers might be the best approach to noise problems, officials said Tuesday. A state Department of Transportation attorney said the city Department of Airports had misinterpreted its original proposal for coping with noise at the city-owned airport.
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