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BUSINESS
March 21, 1998 | Chuck Philips
VNU, the giant Netherlands-based publishing conglomerate, this week purchased 60% of SoundScan Inc., the New York research firm whose computerized retail tracking system transformed the music business in 1991 by providing accurate sales data to record labels. The price was undisclosed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quick experiment: Buy a seismograph and put it on a rickety table. Invite some shady music executives to sit down, then tell them they make money whenever the needle says the earth is moving. Think they might give those table legs a swift kick or two? Congratulations. You now understand some of the shaky history of the nation's pop charts, the influential countdowns that for years were compromised by chicanery, quirks and murky data.
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BUSINESS
November 8, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a campaign that recalls the war several companies waged in 1987 to supply more accurate TV ratings, two research groups are battling to sign up record stores to help them launch competing computerized systems that would provide more accurate music sales data than today's charts. Hartsdale, N.Y.-based SoundScan Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2000 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Eminem may have generated the most controversy in 2000, but one of the outspoken Detroit rapper's favorite targets, glossy teen group 'N Sync, won the war of the pop dollars. By grossing an estimated $212.9 million in combined U.S. album sales and North American concert ticket receipts, the boy band tops a teen-dominated field in Calendar's fourth annual Ultimate Top 10. Another teen sensation, Britney Spears, finished second in the ranking with a whopping $162.7 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
SoundScan, the record industry's "tamper-proof" sales monitoring system, acknowledged for the first time Tuesday that it has uncovered an attempt to manipulate its national pop charts. Mike Fine, the firm's chief executive officer, confirmed a report that a small independent retailer in Raleigh, N.C., falsified sales information for four R&B singles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1992
In figuring Times recipe analyses, several assumptions are made. Unless otherwise specified, butter is assumed to be salted; flour is assumed to be all-purpose; oil is assumed to be canola; chicken is assumed to be skinless breast meat, and optional ingredients are not included. Also, percentage of fat is not included in recipe analyses. This is because such figures can be very misleading when applied to a single recipe, rather than to an entire diet.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quick experiment: Buy a seismograph and put it on a rickety table. Invite some shady music executives to sit down, then tell them they make money whenever the needle says the earth is moving. Think they might give those table legs a swift kick or two? Congratulations. You now understand some of the shaky history of the nation's pop charts, the influential countdowns that for years were compromised by chicanery, quirks and murky data.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When it comes to choosing between David Lee Roth on a concert stage or Arnold Schwarzenegger on the movie screen, the public is opting for the Terminator. And it's easy to see why. "It costs nearly $100 for two people to park, purchase tickets, T-shirts and refreshments at a concert these days," said Gary Bongiovanni, editor of Pollstar, a national concert trade journal based in Fresno. "For that kind of money, a couple can afford to go see 'The Terminator' three or four times.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2000 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Eminem may have generated the most controversy in 2000, but one of the outspoken Detroit rapper's favorite targets, glossy teen group 'N Sync, won the war of the pop dollars. By grossing an estimated $212.9 million in combined U.S. album sales and North American concert ticket receipts, the boy band tops a teen-dominated field in Calendar's fourth annual Ultimate Top 10. Another teen sensation, Britney Spears, finished second in the ranking with a whopping $162.7 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is Billboard magazine's revolutionary new pop chart in jeopardy? Some industry officials say that it is. Three weeks after Billboard introduced its new ranking system, none of the six major U.S. record distributors have signed up with SoundScan, the research firm that provides the computerized sales data on which the chart is based.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1998 | Chuck Philips
VNU, the giant Netherlands-based publishing conglomerate, this week purchased 60% of SoundScan Inc., the New York research firm whose computerized retail tracking system transformed the music business in 1991 by providing accurate sales data to record labels. The price was undisclosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
SoundScan, the record industry's "tamper-proof" sales monitoring system, acknowledged for the first time Tuesday that it has uncovered an attempt to manipulate its national pop charts. Mike Fine, the firm's chief executive officer, confirmed a report that a small independent retailer in Raleigh, N.C., falsified sales information for four R&B singles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1992
In figuring Times recipe analyses, several assumptions are made. Unless otherwise specified, butter is assumed to be salted; flour is assumed to be all-purpose; oil is assumed to be canola; chicken is assumed to be skinless breast meat, and optional ingredients are not included. Also, percentage of fat is not included in recipe analyses. This is because such figures can be very misleading when applied to a single recipe, rather than to an entire diet.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, Chuck Philips is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
What do these people have in common? Elvis Presley and Chuck Berry. John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix. Prince and Madonna. As you roll through the decades of rock, it's not hard to identify the real revolutionaries in the music business. Now add the names Mike Shalett and Mike Fine. Shalett and Fine?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When it comes to choosing between David Lee Roth on a concert stage or Arnold Schwarzenegger on the movie screen, the public is opting for the Terminator. And it's easy to see why. "It costs nearly $100 for two people to park, purchase tickets, T-shirts and refreshments at a concert these days," said Gary Bongiovanni, editor of Pollstar, a national concert trade journal based in Fresno. "For that kind of money, a couple can afford to go see 'The Terminator' three or four times.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is Billboard magazine's revolutionary new pop chart in jeopardy? Some industry officials say that it is. Three weeks after Billboard introduced its new ranking system, none of the six major U.S. record distributors have signed up with SoundScan, the research firm that provides the computerized sales data on which the chart is based.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mike Shalett, a marketing research expert and a 20-year music industry veteran, has been fascinated by the weekly Billboard pop music sales charts for as long as he can remember. As both a radio program director in the '70s and as a record company promotion man in the early '80s, Shalett pored through the charts for hot new records and for musical trends.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, Chuck Philips is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
What do these people have in common? Elvis Presley and Chuck Berry. John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix. Prince and Madonna. As you roll through the decades of rock, it's not hard to identify the real revolutionaries in the music business. Now add the names Mike Shalett and Mike Fine. Shalett and Fine?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mike Shalett, a marketing research expert and a 20-year music industry veteran, has been fascinated by the weekly Billboard pop music sales charts for as long as he can remember. As both a radio program director in the '70s and as a record company promotion man in the early '80s, Shalett pored through the charts for hot new records and for musical trends.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a campaign that recalls the war several companies waged in 1987 to supply more accurate TV ratings, two research groups are battling to sign up record stores to help them launch competing computerized systems that would provide more accurate music sales data than today's charts. Hartsdale, N.Y.-based SoundScan Inc.
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