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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2011 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
In the wake of new California legislation that outlaws the sale and possession of shark fins, some Chinese American food purveyors are objecting that the law unfairly deprives their customers of a centuries-old Asian delicacy, shark fin soup. "Now it's just one more thing Chinese people cannot find in America," said Thai Ong, manager of Monterey Park's Wing Hop Fung, a Chinese specialty store that carries dried shark fin. Dried shark fin, the soup's main ingredient, can sell for more than $2,000 a pound in California.
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March 28, 2012 | By Jenn Harris, Jason La and Michael Robinson
Dining out for $5 or less may seem like a fantasy, but Southern California has much to offer for those on a tight budget. For affordable Vietnamese fare, for example, venture to Garden Grove or Westminster. Or look to food trucks for unique, inexpensive eats. Even some pricier restaurants offer a selection of cheap eats during happy hours. Our list covers a wide range of tastes. We've highlighted some items for you to try, but many of these eateries offer a variety of choices priced $5 or less.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A state ban on shark fins is being challenged in court by a group that says the law is unconstitutional and discriminatory toward Chinese culture. In October, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law prohibiting the possession, sale and distribution of the product, a delicacy long used in Chinese cuisine, specifically in soup. Violators of the ban could face up to six months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Supporters of the ban say that the fins are cruelly obtained — fishermen often slice them off live sharks that are then dumped back into the ocean because of the low demand for other shark meat.
WORLD
January 31, 2012 | By Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times
Tucked away on a glossy menu in the Herbal Cafe, a Beijing restaurant known for its herbal teas and low-fat Cantonese dishes, is a little nod to environmental advocacy. For about $2.50, customers can buy a bowl of imitation shark fin soup made of vegetable stock and potato noodles. "If it was real, then you'd have to kill sharks," said Zhang Gui, the manager. "Sharks are very precious animals. " Demand for shark fin soup, once a dish for Ming Dynasty emperors, has skyrocketed in the last several decades as more people can afford to serve it at business banquets and wedding feasts, thanks to the growth of China's middle class.
FOOD
December 15, 2011 | By Phyllis Glazer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For Jewish parents, the Hanukkah holidays are particularly challenging; they last not one day but eight. Beginning this year at sunset Tuesday and ending at sunset Dec. 28, there will be lots of candles to light, loads of latkes to fry and eight nights of activities to plan for the kids. Oy vey. Also called the Festival of Lights, Hanukkah celebrates liberation from oppression (especially for kids from school, provided that the holiday coincides with Christmas vacation), and the faith that if you really believe in something hard enough, even a small group of committed activists can make a difference.
FOOD
October 23, 1986 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
If there ever was a robust dish that also was endowed with elegance, it is bouillabaisse, a humble peasant soup-stew that has climbed in stature to become one of the great dishes of the world. So great is its reputation that one would not hesitate to serve bouillabaisse to best and dearest friends at the finest party during the holiday season or anytime. If you consult Webster's, you will find that bouillabaisse is from the French words bouli, meaning "to boil" and abaisser, meaning "to settle."
FOOD
May 6, 2009 | S. Irene Virbila
Such a pretty Gewurztraminer from Alsace -- aromatic, scented with spices and flowers, it has the faintest touch of sweetness married with a lively acidity, so it's never cloying. Helfrich's 2007 Gewurztraminer excels as a match for Asian foods -- Thai, Vietnamese and spicy Chinese dishes. But it would be wonderful, too, with a fresh pea soup or risotto, or a spring minestrone and a simple roast chicken.
FOOD
November 25, 2009
Seongbukdong LOCATION 3303 W. 6th St., Los Angeles; (213) 738-8977. PRICE Soups and entrees $8 to $15; steamed beef short ribs $25. BEST DISHES Braised mackerel; steamed beef short ribs; beef-rice soup; bean paste casserole; chopped noodle soup; stuffed chicken-herb soup (taped on the menu in Korean only, ask for samgaetang ). DETAILS Open daily 9 a.m. to midnight. Credit cards. No alcohol. Lot and street parking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
An ancient Asian dining tradition comes to an end in California on Monday, and grocer Emily Gian is none too happy. Gian has slashed prices on shark fins, the astoundingly expensive ingredient of a coveted and ceremonial soup, in hopes she will sell out before a California ban on sale or possession of the delicacy takes effect Monday. "The law is unfair," said Gian, whose store in Los Angeles' Chinatown sells shark fins for $599 a pound. "Why single out Chinese people in California when shark fins are legal in many other states?"
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