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February 10, 2011 | By Sarah Karnasiewicz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My paternal bloodline brims with soup: barley stews studded with black mushrooms and opaque as porridge; the thin tomato broth of our Polish Christmas Eve vigil, swimming with dumplings no bigger than a bird's eye; and the plain, milky, peasant concoction, assembled from Grandma Sophie's kitchen scraps, known affectionately within the clan as "dough-ball-soup. " Though my grandmother is gone and her soups have not passed my father's lips in nearly 20 years, come winter, like clockwork, he sighs for them.
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FOOD
April 29, 2010 | Special to the Los Angeles Times
If Korean barbecue restaurants are the cultural equivalents of American steakhouses — overwhelming piles of meat and booze for a celebratory night out — then Mapo restaurant is the Korean version of a great country diner. Mapo is about the elemental, the rustic and the simple perfection of everyday standards. At Mapo, a tiny restaurant tucked into a strip mall at the corner of 6th and Normandie in Koreatown, there are some barbecue dishes on the menu, but there's a reason they're all shoved into a corner at the end of the menu; they're merely perfunctory here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2011 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
In the wake of new California legislation that outlaws the sale and possession of shark fins, some Chinese American food purveyors are objecting that the law unfairly deprives their customers of a centuries-old Asian delicacy, shark fin soup. "Now it's just one more thing Chinese people cannot find in America," said Thai Ong, manager of Monterey Park's Wing Hop Fung, a Chinese specialty store that carries dried shark fin. Dried shark fin, the soup's main ingredient, can sell for more than $2,000 a pound in California.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A state ban on shark fins is being challenged in court by a group that says the law is unconstitutional and discriminatory toward Chinese culture. In October, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law prohibiting the possession, sale and distribution of the product, a delicacy long used in Chinese cuisine, specifically in soup. Violators of the ban could face up to six months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Supporters of the ban say that the fins are cruelly obtained — fishermen often slice them off live sharks that are then dumped back into the ocean because of the low demand for other shark meat.
FOOD
October 23, 1986 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
If there ever was a robust dish that also was endowed with elegance, it is bouillabaisse, a humble peasant soup-stew that has climbed in stature to become one of the great dishes of the world. So great is its reputation that one would not hesitate to serve bouillabaisse to best and dearest friends at the finest party during the holiday season or anytime. If you consult Webster's, you will find that bouillabaisse is from the French words bouli, meaning "to boil" and abaisser, meaning "to settle."
FOOD
December 15, 2011 | By Phyllis Glazer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For Jewish parents, the Hanukkah holidays are particularly challenging; they last not one day but eight. Beginning this year at sunset Tuesday and ending at sunset Dec. 28, there will be lots of candles to light, loads of latkes to fry and eight nights of activities to plan for the kids. Oy vey. Also called the Festival of Lights, Hanukkah celebrates liberation from oppression (especially for kids from school, provided that the holiday coincides with Christmas vacation), and the faith that if you really believe in something hard enough, even a small group of committed activists can make a difference.
IMAGE
March 28, 2012 | By Jenn Harris, Jason La and Michael Robinson
Dining out for $5 or less may seem like a fantasy, but Southern California has much to offer for those on a tight budget. For affordable Vietnamese fare, for example, venture to Garden Grove or Westminster. Or look to food trucks for unique, inexpensive eats. Even some pricier restaurants offer a selection of cheap eats during happy hours. Our list covers a wide range of tastes. We've highlighted some items for you to try, but many of these eateries offer a variety of choices priced $5 or less.
FOOD
February 10, 2011
  Polish white borscht Total time: 2 hours Servings: 12 Our recipes, your kitchen: If you try this or any other recipe from the L.A. Times Test Kitchen, we would like to know about it so we can showcase it on our food blog and occasionally in print. Upload pictures of the finished dish here. 1 1/2 pounds smoked kielbasa 6 eggs 8 cups water 2 tablespoons butter 4 cloves garlic, minced 4 leeks, white and light green parts only, sliced into thin rounds 2 baking potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes 1/4 cup flour 1 1/2 cups sour cream 1/4 cup prepared horseradish Salt and pepper to taste 1. Into a 4-quart heavy-bottom pot, place the kielbasa and the eggs (still in their shells)
FOOD
November 25, 2009
Seongbukdong LOCATION 3303 W. 6th St., Los Angeles; (213) 738-8977. PRICE Soups and entrees $8 to $15; steamed beef short ribs $25. BEST DISHES Braised mackerel; steamed beef short ribs; beef-rice soup; bean paste casserole; chopped noodle soup; stuffed chicken-herb soup (taped on the menu in Korean only, ask for samgaetang ). DETAILS Open daily 9 a.m. to midnight. Credit cards. No alcohol. Lot and street parking.
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