Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSoup
IN THE NEWS

Soup

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A state ban on shark fins is being challenged in court by a group that says the law is unconstitutional and discriminatory toward Chinese culture. In October, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law prohibiting the possession, sale and distribution of the product, a delicacy long used in Chinese cuisine, specifically in soup. Violators of the ban could face up to six months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Supporters of the ban say that the fins are cruelly obtained — fishermen often slice them off live sharks that are then dumped back into the ocean because of the low demand for other shark meat.
Advertisement
FOOD
October 23, 1986 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
If there ever was a robust dish that also was endowed with elegance, it is bouillabaisse, a humble peasant soup-stew that has climbed in stature to become one of the great dishes of the world. So great is its reputation that one would not hesitate to serve bouillabaisse to best and dearest friends at the finest party during the holiday season or anytime. If you consult Webster's, you will find that bouillabaisse is from the French words bouli, meaning "to boil" and abaisser, meaning "to settle."
FOOD
December 15, 2011 | By Phyllis Glazer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For Jewish parents, the Hanukkah holidays are particularly challenging; they last not one day but eight. Beginning this year at sunset Tuesday and ending at sunset Dec. 28, there will be lots of candles to light, loads of latkes to fry and eight nights of activities to plan for the kids. Oy vey. Also called the Festival of Lights, Hanukkah celebrates liberation from oppression (especially for kids from school, provided that the holiday coincides with Christmas vacation), and the faith that if you really believe in something hard enough, even a small group of committed activists can make a difference.
FOOD
April 20, 2012 | Jonathan Gold, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Have you ever been frightened by a dumpling? Truly, genuinely scared? Because the juicy crab and pork buns at Wang Xing Ji - smoking-hot dumplings the size of water balloons, sneakily full of boiling juice - could probably be weaponized. You could deploy them as grenades, I'm pretty sure, lobbing the heavy spheroids over battlements. Or you could employ them as sub-lethal projectiles, splatting them into the enemy at will, although the sticky broth is undoubtedly prohibited in an obscure codicil of the Geneva Conventions.
FOOD
November 25, 2009
Seongbukdong LOCATION 3303 W. 6th St., Los Angeles; (213) 738-8977. PRICE Soups and entrees $8 to $15; steamed beef short ribs $25. BEST DISHES Braised mackerel; steamed beef short ribs; beef-rice soup; bean paste casserole; chopped noodle soup; stuffed chicken-herb soup (taped on the menu in Korean only, ask for samgaetang ). DETAILS Open daily 9 a.m. to midnight. Credit cards. No alcohol. Lot and street parking.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Whether your tailgate includes a custom grill setup and team color-coordinated tents or a simple picnic on a well-worn blanket, no pre-game ritual is complete without the spread. This is one party that's as much about the food as it is about fans and football. This past weekend, I was in Minneapolis tailgating with friends for the University of Minnesota's homecoming game against the Northwestern Wildcats. We arrived at the parking lot Saturday morning around 8:30 to party before the 11 a.m.  kickoff.
FOOD
March 7, 2001
There is a much easier way to prepare dashi, the uniquely flavored and indispensable stock for miso soup ('Miso in America," Feb. 21). Prepared dashi powder is sold in small boxes containing several sealed packets, much like bouillon, and available in any market selling Japanese groceries. Using prepared dashi, one can make as much or as little miso as one wants and have it at once. Simply boil the amount of water wanted for soup, add some of the powdered dashi (it dissolves instantly)
FOOD
February 6, 2002
It may interest your readers that the Swabian version of rivels ("I Love That Spotsy Soup, Lumps and All," Jan. 30) is even more practical because it needs no milk. Only water is added. Or it can be made with eggs only. The authentic version is scraped from a wooden board with a metal scraper (spatzenschaber) or a knife into the boiling water. There are many delightful recipes that use it, such as the soup-like Gaisburger Marsch or the Schinken und Kaesespatzen, a specialty of the Algau, the mountainous area of southern Germany.
FOOD
September 9, 2010
Western Soondae LOCATION 543 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles; (213) 389-5288. PRICE Soup (small), $4.99; deluxe soup with sausage side, $10.99; soondae plate, $10.99; potato pancake, $7.99. DETAILS Open 24 hours daily. Visa and MasterCard. Alcohol. Lot and street parking. Moobongri Soondae LOCATION 2949 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles; (213) 387-1600. PRICE Soup (small), $5.99; soondae plates with cold cuts (sizes vary), $8.99 to $19.99; bokum (for 3 or more)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|