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OPINION
May 25, 2013
Re "Why USC, Dr. Dre?," Opinion, May 21 Proving that no good deed goes unpunished, Dillard University President Walter M. Kimbrough says that Andre Young (also known as Dr. Dre) should have considered donating the $35 million he gave USC to a historically black college such as his. It's sad that Kimbrough would intimate that race should have played a factor here. USC has a great history of developing the next generation of creative people in the arts, so it's natural to have music industry leaders challenge the university to develop the next line of producers, editors and artists.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2013 | By Martha Groves
From Venice Beach comes a seemingly simple tale of art imitating art, complicated by the ghost of a rock 'n' roll legend. In early 1969, a pioneering Venice muralist thought it would be a kick to paint a trompe l'oeil street scene on the back exterior wall of his studio, so that if an observer stood across the street and looked left and right he'd see the same view, more or less. From a distance that allowed ample perspective, artist Victor Henderson photographed a motley stretch of structures just down the block, with a slip of the calm Pacific in the background.
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SPORTS
January 3, 1987
The moral for our two football teams to be more successful in 1987: Do not make rock videos! NATE GLEIBERMAN Beverly Hills
OPINION
May 25, 2013
Re "Why USC, Dr. Dre?," Opinion, May 21 Proving that no good deed goes unpunished, Dillard University President Walter M. Kimbrough says that Andre Young (also known as Dr. Dre) should have considered donating the $35 million he gave USC to a historically black college such as his. It's sad that Kimbrough would intimate that race should have played a factor here. USC has a great history of developing the next generation of creative people in the arts, so it's natural to have music industry leaders challenge the university to develop the next line of producers, editors and artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | GREGG WAGER
Few composers might use the idea of setting a chocolate cake recipe for voice and piano, but composer Lee Hoiby will do just that with the West Coast premiere of "Bon Appetit!" on Tuesday. But there's a deeper metaphor. In some ways, it's also his sugary statement against what he considers sour notes. "Atonality left me cold.
SPORTS
November 6, 2010 | Mark Heisler
It's a hard world to get a break in when two-time defending champions don't have their own ESPN "microsite," like Some People. If no one else cares, the Lakers are excited about the coming 2010-11 season, too. Oh, it has already started? Those last six games were real? It's quiet around the Lakers, now in no-drama mode, just as I foresaw. Too quiet. Of course, I foresaw it three seasons ago or two seasons early, when the arrival of Pau Gasol, an effortless fit with Kobe Bryant, seemed to herald a new harmonious age. Instead, after strolling through the 2008 postseason ?
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
If the fat lady didn't sing Tuesday night, she certainly tuned up her voice. Since his crushing defeat in last Saturday's South Carolina primary, Republican presidential candidate Pat Robertson had taken to noting that the race for the nomination "isn't over until the fat lady sings." With Super Tuesday returns showing him defeated soundly in 16 of the 17 states holding GOP contests--most of them in what he has called his back yard--Robertson's campaign now appears dominated by sour notes.
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | SUE AVERY, Times Staff Writer
The abrupt decision to cancel the 1986-87 season of the highly acclaimed Pasadena Chamber Orchestra has led to charges by the group's conductor and some of his supporters that the board of directors overreacted to projected deficits. The board canceled the season Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1988 | LONN JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
When he steps to the Hammond keyboards, high in a glass booth where no one can see him, a buzz of anticipation already has begun below. Nothing can happen until he starts the set. Tens of thousands of fans are waiting. As the opening bars waft from the public address system, the crowd is on its feet, singing along. But Joe Tripoli, organist for the Angels baseball team at Anaheim Stadium, is nonchalant. "I've done the national anthem probably 880 times," he figures.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES
Y2K doesn't seem to be as big a concern in Hollywood as Y99. With high costs, tough economics, threats from new technologies and a continuing cooling-off of production activity in Southern California all lurking, 1999 doesn't bode well for the film, TV and music industries. There will be some bright spots. The force will be back when George Lucas' "The Phantom Menace" Star Wars "prequel" is released in May by 20th Century Fox.
SPORTS
November 29, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
It's nearly midnight on a rainy Wednesday, and Ben Howland is sitting in the only part of new Pauley Pavilion that is not spacious and sparkling. The coaches' locker room. That's right, in the only place in this basketball palace that Howland can hide, he can barely fit, with six coaches crammed into a dressing space the size of a large closet. It's an appropriate metaphor that is not lost on a UCLA basketball boss whose once stern expression has been softened into a perpetual look of weariness.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
May We Be Forgiven A Novel A.M. Homes Viking: 496 pp., $27.95 "May We Be Forgiven" begins at a Thanksgiving celebration in an affluent New York City commuter community. It's Cheever country with a black comedy upgrade. All this happens within the first 15 pages: Successful television executive George gets into a car accident, killing two parents and leaving their son an orphan. While George is away under observation, his brother Harry consoles Jane, his sister-in-law; before you know it, they're sleeping together.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Even on a day designed to celebrate 50 years of the signature harmonies of the Beach Boys, the notoriously fractious group couldn't avoid striking yet another discordant note amid all the good vibrations.   A day before band members gathered at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles to take in various accolades, singer and lyricist Mike Love caught his fellow band members by surprise in announcing his decision to resume touring with his latter-day incarnation of the Beach Boys -- minus creative leader Brian Wilson or original members Al Jardine and David Marks.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
Colombia's president, Juan Manuel Santos, announced Tuesday that his government has agreed to a road map to launch peace talks with the country's largest and oldest rebel group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. Santos said the talks will begin in October in Norway, and continue outside of Colombia. The negotiations mark the first time since 2002 that the government and the FARC will sit down to discuss a possible end to the brutal, nearly 50-year-old civil conflict that has claimed thousands of lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
Manhattan is a gleaming, grime-free zone that's alive with buskers in "Downtown Express," which declares New York the music capital of the world and spins a willfully wide-eyed comic drama from the debatable premise. The unconvincing but gently spirited "Jazz Singer" update features accomplished musicians in the lead roles; the treat is their playing, not their acting. Mainly this is a showcase for violinist Philippe Quint, an impassioned and charming musician. He plays Russian émigré Sasha, who has landed a scholarship to Juilliard, where he prepares for a recital meant to launch a Carnegie Hall-destined career.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2012 | David Lazarus
There's chutzpah and then there's just plain wrong. The Corn Refiners Assn., stung by accusations that high-fructose corn syrup is a leading cause of the obesity epidemic, applied to the Food and Drug Administration a couple of years ago for permission to change the name of the refiners' product to the more pleasant-sounding "corn sugar. " The FDA has finally issued its ruling: No. "The use of the term 'corn sugar' to describe high-fructose corn syrup - a product that is a syrup - would not accurately identify or describe the basic nature of the food or its characteristics," Tamara Ward, an agency spokeswoman, told me. "Under FDA regulations, a sugar is a solid, dried and crystallized food, whereas syrup is an aqueous solution or liquid food," she said.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2008 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Alan Greenspan retired in January 2006 as one of history's most lauded Federal Reserve Board chairmen, the subject of accolades that stopped just short of deification. But just as markets have a way of overshooting both on the way up and on the way down, the needle on Greenspan's Fed tenure has swung from adulation to denunciation in a matter of months. With the economy now sputtering, Greenspan has increasingly been tagged as "Mr.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2011 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Sixteen-year-old Wayne Ross has a hard time believing that the musicians in his high school marching band - the ones who put in grueling hours of practice, the ones admired for their high-stepping panache, the ones celebrated in their own reality TV show - could be associated with the lurid hazing scandal unfolding 260 miles away at Florida A&M University. "Everyone around here loves the band," Ross said last week while walking to class at Southwest DeKalb High School. "They're a big influence on everyone.
OPINION
May 2, 2011
Re "Guitarist, land agency strike chord," April 29 It's painful enough to watch the beauty and biological richness of the Santa Monica Mountains degraded by developers trying to maximize profits. But for U2 guitarist the Edge to build his mansions on precious undeveloped coastal habitat and claim he is doing it in an environmentally friendly way is depressing. (Will the bulldozers have hybrid motors?) Thanks, Edge, for making us all even more cynical. And do us all one favor before you begin the destruction: Promise not to write an inspiring song about it. Noel Rhodes Los Angeles My dad played the guitar in a dance band during the Depression, and with five kids, life was a struggle.
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