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NEWS
February 11, 1994 | Reuters
The commander of the military wing of the radical Pan Africanist Congress of South Africa, Victor Sabelo Phama, was killed in a car crash in southern Tanzania, government officials said Thursday. Phama died instantly Wednesday night when his car rammed into a stationary truck outside the town of Morogoro, 125 miles west of the capital Dar es Salaam, they added.
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Mark Gevisser
In South Africa today, as the country celebrates the 20th anniversary of its democracy and prepares for elections, two deeply flawed folk heroes - one venal, the other violent - have commandeered the headlines. The president, Jacob Zuma, was recently found by the Public Protector, an independent constitutional body, to have misappropriated $20 million to upgrade his private home. And Oscar Pistorius, a double amputee who awed the world with his speed running on prosthetic legs, is being tried for murder in the killing of his girlfriend.
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NEWS
January 31, 1987 | From the Washington Post
South African Ambassador to Britain Denis Worrall resigned Friday, saying he wants to return to his country and "re-enter national public life." Although Worrall did not specify his plans, informed speculation here said he intends to leave South Africa's ruling National Party and run as an independent candidate for Parliament in the whites-only election scheduled for May 6.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
 When a small group of Nigerian Islamist militants attacked two police stations and killed an officer, government security forces moved in swiftly, announcing they had "crushed" the revolt. Ten months later, the militants attacked two more stations, slaying four officers. This time Nigerian security forces killed dozens of fighters, and the state police commissioner announced that it was just "a matter of hours before [all] the militants will be flushed out. " More than a decade later, that hasn't happened.
SPORTS
April 10, 2010
World Cup 2010: SOUTH AFRICA FIFA ranking: 88 Overall World Cup record: 1-2-3 Coach: Carlos Alberto Parreira Best performance: First round, 1998, 2002 Overview: South Africa finds itself in the same situation the U.S. was in back in 1994 -- playing host to a World Cup and expected to perform but without a legitimate star or even much of a team. The U.S. reached the second round, and Parreira's squad will be desperate to avoid the ignominy of being the first Cup host in history not to make it out the first round.
OPINION
April 19, 2009 | Mark Gevisser, Mark Gevisser is writer in residence at the University of Pretoria and the author of "A Legacy of Liberation: Thabo Mbeki and the Future of the South African Dream."
Campaigning in his KwaZulu-Natal heartland last week, Jacob Zuma took aim at one of his sharpest critics, the Nobel laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu. The cleric had "strayed" from his pastoral responsibilities by criticizing him, said Zuma, who has battled charges of fraud and racketeering for most of the last decade. "As far as I know," Zuma said, "the role of priests is to pray for the souls of sinners, not condemn them."
SPORTS
April 12, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Vuvuzelas might be on the way out during soccer games in South Africa, where Premier Soccer League officials are considering a ban on the plastic horns, but not for the reason one might think. The vuvuzela gained international attention during the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, where the blare of the horn was a constant drone during play. As irritating as many found the sound, the fact that the horns have been used as weapons is now of concern to soccer officials. Vuvuzelas were among objects thrown at Orlando Pirates Coach Roger de Sa after a recent game in which fans were unhappy with the home team's draw against AmaZulu.
OPINION
April 25, 2009
Jacob Zuma, the man destined to become South Africa's president after his African National Congress party swept national elections this week, is a polygamist, a former communist revolutionary with little formal education, an alleged taker of lavish bribes and a man so stunningly clueless about his nation's No. 1 public health threat that he once declared his belief that he could fend off HIV by showering after sex. Needless to say, he makes many foreign observers very nervous.
OPINION
June 1, 2010
Sixteen years after the end of apartheid, South Africa is at a crossroads. The country that was ushered into black majority rule by African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela has held four free and fair national elections since 1994, conducted a pioneering truth-and-reconciliation process, established a respectable multiracial judiciary and maintained a robust free press. The competence and integrity of successive ANC governments have been called into question, but not their fundamental legitimacy.
SPORTS
June 7, 2009 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Ready or not, South Africa, here they come. On Thursday, it will be exactly one year until the first ball is kicked in anger at the 2010 World Cup, the first to take place on the African continent and the first to be played in winter since Argentina '78. Reams could be written about how unprepared South Africa still is, but there will be enough of that later. For the moment, it is sufficient to note that the first four countries have qualified for the monthlong, 32-nation tournament.
WORLD
April 21, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The United Nations on Monday condemned ethnic killings by South Sudan rebels that left hundreds of people dead last week after the fall of an oil town to the opposition forces. The world body said the killings took place in Bentiu, the hub of the country's main oil producing region in the north.  U.N. spokesman Joe Contreras said in a statement that some members of the rebel Sudan Peoples Liberation Movement in Opposition broadcast hate messages on radio after taking control of Bentiu, urging certain ethnic groups to leave town.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
US Airways apologized Monday for sending out a Twitter message that included a pornographic image. The airline acknowledged that the image came from its Twitter account but said it was sent by mistake. US Airways said the image was originally sent to the airline's account and US Airways tried to flag is as inappropriate. "Unfortunately the image was inadvertently included in a response to a customer," the airline said in a statement. "We immediately realized the error and removed our tweet.
WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Oscar Pistorius complained he was “tired” Friday in his murder trial in South Africa, prompting Judge Thokozile Masipa to ask if that was “the reason you're making all these mistakes” in testimony. The Olympic athlete, charged with murder in the death of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, several times contradicted himself, recanted or apologized for “mistakes” in his statement. He said he was tired, adding that this was not going to change. But Masipa cautioned Pistorius that if he was making mistakes because he was tired, he must say so. “It's important that you should be all here when you are in that witness box," she told him. "If you are tired and that's the reason you're making all these mistakes you must say so. It doesn't help to say it won't change.” “The question is, are you too tired to proceed, because you can be at a disadvantage when you're in that witness box. Are you making the mistakes because you're too tired?
WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Aamera Jiwaji
British businessman Shrien Dewani has been extradited to South Africa to stand trial on murder charges in the death of his Swedish bride. His arraignment in a Western Cape High Court earlier Tuesday, where he was formally charged with the murder of his wife, Anni, could spell the start of a second emotionally wrought murder trial for South Africa, spellbound already by revelations in the case against Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius. The 28-year-old Anni and her husband were on a slum tourism trip through a Cape Town township during their 2010 honeymoon when they were carjacked at gunpoint.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - A British businessman accused of arranging his bride's murder while on their honeymoon was put on a plane to South Africa on Monday after losing a three-year battle against being extradited to face trial. South African authorities allege that Shrien Dewani took out a contract on his wife's life almost immediately upon the couple's arrival in the country in November 2010 to celebrate their marriage. Anni Dewani, 28, was shot dead and her husband thrown out of their taxi in an apparent carjacking outside Cape Town.
WORLD
April 6, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa - Johan Gerber is a shy, neat man with iron-gray hair, a ready smile and a quiet voice. But on the streets, he has taken to carrying an open pocket knife with a mean 4-inch blade, concealed in an envelope and ready to use. Last month, three men accosted him in broad daylight, one of whom hit him in the stomach and grabbed his cellphone. A few years back, eight men surrounded him, held a knife to his throat and stole his wallet. His car and two trailers also have been stolen.
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - When South African airport officials threatened to send Dr. Paul Semugoma back to his native Uganda, he shook with fear. Semugoma, an outspoken gay activist, was determined to remain in this country, where he has lived for two years, rather than be sent back to one of Africa's most homophobic countries. Held by immigration officers after returning to South Africa with an expired visa, he was allowed to stay only after an outcry from human rights groups mindful of new legislation in Uganda calling for life in prison for those who engage in repeated acts of gay sex. The harshness of the law signed days later by Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni - and similar strictures in more than three dozen African nations - is triggering a profound reaction in Africa.
WORLD
March 19, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South African President Jacob Zuma personally benefited from a $23-million state-paid “security” upgrade to his private residence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, according to South Africa's public protector, an official with the duties of an ombudsman. Her findings over a scandal known in South Africa as “Nkandla-gate” -- a reference to the name of Zuma's homestead - are highly damaging to the governing African National Congress with less than two months to an election.
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