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NEWS
June 9, 1988
South Africa's armed forces commander announced a mobilization of reservists and said that South African soldiers had skirmished with Cuban troops in Angola. Gen. Jannie Geldenhuys said the mobilization was in response to a buildup of Cuban troops in southern Angola. He said the Cuban units, who support Angola's Marxist government, were within 12 miles of the border with Namibia (South-West Africa).
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NEWS
May 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
A former special forces officer Thursday described killing hundreds of black prisoners and tossing their bodies from an airplane, in testimony that shed light on the horrors of South Africa's apartheid-era regime. Johan Theron's testimony for the first time crystallized the events of two decades ago.
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NEWS
July 25, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new chief of South Africa's armed forces, Gen. Siphiwe Nyanda, is not even two months on the job, but he is already leading troops into a battle zone. Unlike his apartheid-era predecessors, however, the country's first black military leader is not cutting his combat teeth in neighboring countries. His maiden operational command is at home in Richmond, a timber and agricultural town in KwaZulu-Natal province where at least 30 people have died in political violence this month.
NEWS
September 26, 1998 | From Reuters
South African troops were preparing to fan out to other parts of Lesotho today after imposing calm on the capital, which was ravaged by a wave of anarchy that had erupted as they moved in to quell a rebellion. Prime Minister Pakalitha Mosisili, speaking in his first national broadcast since he called South African and Botswana troops to his rescue Tuesday, declared that the army mutiny was over.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost everyone in the know, including President Nelson Mandela, has dismissed as absurd a recent military intelligence report claiming that a host of disgruntled black leaders was plotting to overthrow Mandela's government. For weeks, all eyes in South Africa have been focused on Gen.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A six-month-long judicial inquiry, investigating allegations that government death squads assassinated 71 political opponents, exonerated the police Tuesday but blamed a covert army unit for two murders. Justice Louis Harms, who led the government-appointed commission, recommended that the authorities consider charges against army operatives for the two 1986 murders in Pretoria's Mamelodi township, a 1989 bombing near Cape Town and plots to kill three political activists.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an extraordinary public inquiry into allegations of state-supported political assassinations, South African military officials admitted Monday that members of a secret army unit tailed anti-apartheid activists, planted a bomb at a township meeting hall and plotted to send the fetus of a baboon to Anglican Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | PAUL TAYLOR, THE WASHINGTON POST
President Frederik W. de Klerk acknowledged Saturday for the first time that senior members of South Africa's security forces had engaged in illegal activities--probably including assassination--against political targets, and he took disciplinary action against almost two dozen officers.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Frederik W. de Klerk, reacting to accusations of an army "dirty tricks" campaign, said he has replaced the command of South African military intelligence and ordered some of its files seized. De Klerk said in a statement after a 10-hour Cabinet meeting that Gen. Pierre Steyn, chief of the Defense Force Staff, had been placed in immediate command of all intelligence organizations of the armed forces.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The killing of 28 African National Congress supporters by black homeland soldiers last week appeared Saturday to have done what four months of demanding and mudslinging from all sides had failed to do--nudge ANC leader Nelson Mandela and President Frederik W. de Klerk back to the discussion table.
NEWS
July 25, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new chief of South Africa's armed forces, Gen. Siphiwe Nyanda, is not even two months on the job, but he is already leading troops into a battle zone. Unlike his apartheid-era predecessors, however, the country's first black military leader is not cutting his combat teeth in neighboring countries. His maiden operational command is at home in Richmond, a timber and agricultural town in KwaZulu-Natal province where at least 30 people have died in political violence this month.
NEWS
May 30, 1998 | Associated Press
Gen. Siphiwe Nyanda became the first black to head South Africa's military Friday, receiving a ceremonial sword and a salute from his white predecessor, Georg Meiring. In his speech at a military base outside the capital, Pretoria, Nyanda struck a tone of conciliation as he took the helm of a military that had sought to kill him when he commanded African National Congress guerrillas just a few years ago.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Soviet-trained former commander of the main anti-apartheid guerrilla force has been appointed the first black chief of the South African National Defense Force. Lt. Gen. Siphiwe Nyanda inherits a 93,000-strong force in the throes of change and rattled by an intelligence fiasco that led to his predecessor's sudden resignation. Gen.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost everyone in the know, including President Nelson Mandela, has dismissed as absurd a recent military intelligence report claiming that a host of disgruntled black leaders was plotting to overthrow Mandela's government. For weeks, all eyes in South Africa have been focused on Gen.
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | Reuters
Defense Minister Joe Modise said Monday that more than 2,200 former guerrillas had been dismissed from South Africa's post-apartheid forces for failing to meet a midnight deadline to report for duty. "The people who were not back by midnight last night are out. They're no longer part of the process," a Modise spokeswoman said.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Nelson Mandela said he has given about 2,500 mutinous former guerrillas boycotting army assembly points seven days to return or be dismissed. Mandela said the grievances that led to a mutiny among former guerrillas will take time to resolve. Grievances included slow movement on integrating forces, some army officials were seen to be racist, unfavorable living conditions and salary discrepancies.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | From Associated Press
President Frederik W. de Klerk called Wednesday for urgent talks with Nelson Mandela to halt spiraling violence, warning that reform efforts cannot continue until the bloodshed ends. But De Klerk also lashed out at Mandela's African National Congress, contending that Communists in its leadership are trying to ruin the reform process with violent protests.
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | Reuters
This country plans to scrap its whites-only system of military conscription and replace it with a voluntary army, Defense Minister Kobie Coetsee said Wednesday. Parliament will consider the change at the coming session, he said. Under the present system, every medically fit white male citizen reports for a 12-month term of continuous training and then serves for a few weeks every year.
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Nelson Mandela, commander in chief of the new army of South Africa, clearly was angry. "Discipline in the armed forces cannot break down," he warned. The object of his ire? The men and women who fought in his name in the ragtag guerrilla forces that helped bring down apartheid. Almost 7,000 members of the now-disbanded army of the African National Congress went absent without leave Oct. 5 from military assembly areas where they are being assimilated into the new National Defense Force.
NEWS
May 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A soldier was shot and killed in the black township of Thokoza, where 12 people died in a sudden resurgence of political violence two days earlier. Another five people were killed in the volatile KwaZulu-Natal province, the Zulu heartland where 10,000 people died in a decade of factional fighting.
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