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South Africa Arms Sales

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NEWS
July 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The government said it will end secrecy surrounding arms deals with other countries, sweeping away the cloak-and-dagger approach of the apartheid era. Kader Asmal, chairman of the state arms control committee, said the Cabinet had agreed to proposals to provide maximum public disclosure. Under the new regulations, disclosure would include the total value of a contract, a description of items, the date of export and details of any counter-trade arrangements.
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NEWS
July 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The government said it will end secrecy surrounding arms deals with other countries, sweeping away the cloak-and-dagger approach of the apartheid era. Kader Asmal, chairman of the state arms control committee, said the Cabinet had agreed to proposals to provide maximum public disclosure. Under the new regulations, disclosure would include the total value of a contract, a description of items, the date of export and details of any counter-trade arrangements.
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NEWS
July 4, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many people here, the raft of indictments handed up last November by a U.S. grand jury against a key South African company appeared to be the end of an era. The company was Armscor, the state-owned arms maker and arms merchant. For the second time it was being charged with receiving as much as $30 million in U.S. munitions between 1978 and 1989 in violation of an international arms embargo and with diverting some of the materiel to Iraq.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States fired a harsh verbal warning at South Africa on Monday, threatening to cut off economic aid if the nation's leaders go ahead with reported plans to sell military equipment to Syria. Calling the matter one of "very serious concern," State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said that U.S. law prohibits recipients of American aid from selling arms to nations that it has identified as supporting international terrorism.
NEWS
October 8, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An aging Danish freighter, now anchored off Port Elizabeth, is an unseemly reminder of this nation's unsavory past--and uncertain future--in the shadowy world of international arms trading. Aboard the Arktis Pioneer are enough guns to equip a fair-sized army--almost 25,000 AK-47 and G-3 assault rifles, plus 14 million rounds of ammunition. But controversy rides with them. The rifles were bought from Armscor, South Africa's state-owned weapons broker, by a Lebanese middleman named Eli Wazen.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States fired a harsh verbal warning at South Africa on Monday, threatening to cut off economic aid if the nation's leaders go ahead with reported plans to sell military equipment to Syria. Calling the matter one of "very serious concern," State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said that U.S. law prohibits recipients of American aid from selling arms to nations that it has identified as supporting international terrorism.
NEWS
October 8, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An aging Danish freighter, now anchored off Port Elizabeth, is an unseemly reminder of this nation's unsavory past--and uncertain future--in the shadowy world of international arms trading. Aboard the Arktis Pioneer are enough guns to equip a fair-sized army--almost 25,000 AK-47 and G-3 assault rifles, plus 14 million rounds of ammunition. But controversy rides with them. The rifles were bought from Armscor, South Africa's state-owned weapons broker, by a Lebanese middleman named Eli Wazen.
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many people here, the raft of indictments handed up last November by a U.S. grand jury against a key South African company appeared to be the end of an era. The company was Armscor, the state-owned arms maker and arms merchant. For the second time it was being charged with receiving as much as $30 million in U.S. munitions between 1978 and 1989 in violation of an international arms embargo and with diverting some of the materiel to Iraq.
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