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NEWS
July 10, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-one years after it was expelled from Olympic competition for its racially discriminatory policy of apartheid, South Africa won readmission from the International Olympic Committee here Tuesday, opening the door for South African athletes to participate in the 1992 Olympic Games. The historic decision, based largely on the South African Parliament's repeal of key apartheid statutes in June, is expected to give a big boost to the reform movement of South African President Frederik W.
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SPORTS
July 8, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The furor caused by the selection of Germany over South Africa as host nation for soccer's 2006 World Cup showed no sign of dying on Friday. The South Africans are furious and considering legal action, the Germans are laughing, albeit a bit sheepishly, about a hoax letter that contributed to the uproar, and the man who caused it all is home in New Zealand, his future very much in doubt.
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SPORTS
July 28, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
South Africa's Amateur Athletics Assn. on Saturday voted against sending a team to the World Track and Field Championships in Tokyo next month. The vote was 9-5. Only delegates of the South African Amateur Athletics Union favored participation, which would have marked South Africa's debut in world competition after 21 years of banishment. The Athletics Union is one of three major groups making up the newly formed and racially integrated Athletics Assn.
SPORTS
July 7, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
African soccer suffered a devastating blow Thursday when Germany defeated South Africa by a single vote, 12-11, for the right to stage the 2006 World Cup. The quadrennial championship, launched in 1930, never has been played on the African continent, just as the Olympic Games never have been held there. That was supposed to change Thursday when the 24 executive-committee members of FIFA, soccer's world governing body, voted in Zurich, Switzerland.
SPORTS
July 26, 1992 | JOHN JEANSONNE, NEWSDAY
So we watched the world go by last night. Colorful, vigorous, diverse, extravagant. And political to the core. All of which Barcelona's Olympic opening ceremony reflected as well as ever in these hopelessly idealistic, warm and friendly rituals. Impossible to miss among the universal spectacle was a tiny black man leading his delegation of virtually all-white South African athletes back into the Olympic family after 32 years of isolation.
SPORTS
December 16, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Seven more track and field athletes, among them Tom Petranoff, former world record-holder in the javelin, were suspended indefinitely Thursday by The Athletics Congress, the sport's U.S. governing body, for their participation this fall in a series of meets in South Africa. The Athletics Congress serves as the U.S. agent of the International Amateur Athletic Federation, which does not sanction meets in South Africa because of that government's official policy of racial separation.
SPORTS
July 15, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Africa's return to international athletic competition this summer, after more than 30 years of isolation, has been much like the former sports pariah's departure--marked by protests, pickets and isolated celebrations. This summer, South Africa returns to Olympic competition after having last competed--with an all-white delegation--at the 1960 Rome Games.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When South Africa's Olympic boss, Sam Ramsamy, announced a few days ago that his nation's absence from the Olympics would end next summer, after 32 years, the whoops of delight echoed from Cape Town to Johannesburg. But some of the cheers quickly turned to boos when whites learned there was a small catch. South Africans would be in Barcelona all right--but without the national flag, the national anthem or the national sporting symbol, the springbok.
SPORTS
April 21, 1988 | Jim Murray
You begin with the fact that apartheid is a cancer on the world body politic--to say nothing of its soul. You combat it the best way you can. But you don't throw maidens into a volcano. Neither do you conduct a lifelong vendetta against a young female runner. And you don't get Great Britain thrown out of the Olympic Games. The aim of the Supreme Council of Sport in Africa and the African-bloc nations in the international track and field federation is laudable.
SPORTS
August 23, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the leaders of the anti-apartheid sports movement, returning from a fact-finding trip to South Africa, says it is conceivable that the isolated nation could return to Olympic competition by 1996. "The signs are very positive, very favorable," said Sam Ramsamy, executive chairman of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee, in a phone interview from his home in London. "If you would have looked at the situation 18 months ago, you would have seen a very different picture.
SPORTS
July 6, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the battle to stage the 2006 World Cup soccer tournament were viewed as a 100-meter race, Wednesday marked the point where the would-be winners leaned forward into the tape. Germany and South Africa were neck and neck entering today's vote in Zurich, Switzerland, with England and Morocco resigned to the inevitable. The decision on which nation hosts the 18th edition of the quadrennial world championship could come down to only one or two votes among 24 FIFA executive committee members.
SPORTS
July 5, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was in Ouagadougou, of all places, where it all began. There, in the capital of Burkina Faso some 28 months ago, South Africa officially announced it would bid to stage soccer's 2006 World Cup. "It is time that we had a chance to show that the African continent can also play host to the biggest sporting event in the world," said Danny Jordaan, secretary-general of the South African Football Assn.
SPORTS
July 3, 2000 | DOUG CRESS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We carried blacks, all South African blacks, on our shoulders that night. You can't imagine how heavy that was. --Patrick Ntsoelengoe, Black XI soccer player * Back then, Jomo Sono was not allowed into the posh Johannesburg suburb of Turffontein. Certainly not to play soccer, and certainly not after dark. After all, South Africa's policy of apartheid was about keeping the races as separate and unequal as possible, even for the best black athletes of a generation.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
It's unusual to make a sitting president testify in court. Rarer still to force testimony from one with the stature of Nelson Mandela. And downright unheard of for the judge to accuse that president of insolence. But Mandela's courtroom ordeal paid off Friday when the nation's highest court ruled in his favor in the lengthy legal battle over racism in white South Africa's national pastime: rugby.
SPORTS
June 12, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of Table Mountain, the city of Cape Town stretches out until it blends into tree-shaded suburbs and sunny beach towns, the homes of affluent South Africans. But there is another side to Cape Town, a side of ramshackle dwellings and roaming gangs. A side where poverty and crime walk hand in hand. It was there, on the other side of the tracks, that Benedict McCarthy grew up.
SPORTS
June 9, 1998
DENMARK * World Cup Record: Played four, won three, lost one, tied 0, goals for 10, goals against 6. * Best Finish: Second round, 1986. * 1994 Showing: Did not qualify. * Coach: Bo Johansson. A native of Sweden but readily accepted by Danish fans after he defeated the Swedes in his first game in charge. A fierce opponent of defensive-minded soccer. * Players to Watch: Peter Schmeichel, Marc Rieper, Michael Laudrup, Thomas Helveg, Brian Laudrup.
SPORTS
November 18, 1988 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, Times Staff Writer
The divisive issue of South African sport has been difficult for Bruce Fordyce, who lives in the Johannesburg suburb of Forest Town. Fordyce, perhaps the world's best ultra-marathon runner, empathizes with his fellow South African athletes, who are stymied by an international boycott resulting from their country's official policy of apartheid, or racial segregation. But he realizes that the boycott has been instrumental in forcing desegregation of sport in his country, which he endorses.
SPORTS
November 19, 1988 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
In a precedent-setting move, a three-member panel voted unanimously Friday to suspend indefinitely three U.S. athletes and a coach who participated in a series of track and field meets in South Africa last month in defiance of an international ban. The hearing, called by The Athletics Congress, the national governing body of track and field, was to have determined the fate of 16 of the athletes and coaches who participated in the tour, but 12 requested a later hearing, which the panel granted.
NEWS
May 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The country's rugby chief resigned, a step toward resolving a crisis that highlighted the nation's racial divisions and threatened to isolate its white-dominated team. Louis Luyt, president of the South African Rugby Football Union, officially resigned by notifying the union's headquarters, said Anthony Mackaiser, a spokesman for the group. But that does not end the showdown between the rugby union and the National Sports Council, the country's sports oversight committee.
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South African Rugby Football Union won a bitterly contested court case Friday against the black-led South African government when a judge ruled that an investigation of the organization was unjustified. Pretoria Supreme Court Justice William de Villiers gave no reasons for his decision to nullify an order by President Nelson Mandela to set up a rugby commission of inquiry.
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