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NEWS
February 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 27-year wait for a glimpse of Nelson R. Mandela grew frenzied Monday as school classrooms emptied in black townships around Johannesburg and about 35,000 people showed up at a soccer stadium in Soweto to welcome home the black nationalist leader. But the guest of honor didn't show up.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Religious people from around the world are gathering in the southern port of Cape Town to celebrate their shared spirituality and debate the moral foundations of the coming millennium. Delegates to the Parliament of the World's Religions, which convened Wednesday for the third time in 106 years, represent most major faiths, including Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism and Taoism. The Dalai Lama of Tibet will deliver the session's main address this Wednesday.
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NEWS
February 12, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun rose hot on this black township Sunday morning, but its people did not. After a night of joyous celebrations following the news of Nelson R. Mandela's impending release, no one, it seems, had even gone to sleep. By early morning, this suburban Cape Town settlement was teeming with activity on a day usually reserved for quiet rest and church-going. The scene here and in the neighboring Nyanga township was anything but tranquil.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thabo Mbeki, a child of the struggle against apartheid who was sent into exile 37 years ago to prepare for black majority rule, became this country's second elected black leader Wednesday, replacing retiring President Nelson Mandela. Mbeki took the oath of office in three languages outside the Union Buildings, the seat of government since 1913 and the center of white minority rule until five years ago.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush telephoned Nelson R. Mandela from the White House on Sunday, told him all Americans "were rejoicing at his release" after 27 years in South Africa's prisons and personally invited him to the White House. "He told me that he wanted to consult some of his colleagues, but that he expected he would be able to accept my invitation," the President told reporters in the Rose Garden late Sunday afternoon. "It was a very friendly conversation," Bush said.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a biographer of Nelson R. Mandela offered the African National Congress a look at her new book a few months ago, rebel leader Oliver R. Tambo asked her to take out the tender love letters that Mandela had written from prison to his wife, Winnie. "He thought it wasn't dignified for a man of Mandela's stature," recalled author Fatima Meer. But Mandela overruled his former law partner, telling Meer: "You leave it all in. It's true. There's no reason for us to hide these things."
NEWS
July 19, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Nelson R. Mandela, the imprisoned black nationalist leader, turned 70 years old Monday amid a nationwide, police-enforced ban on celebrations of his birthday and an unprecedented call for his release from a pro-government newspaper. Beeld, the country's largest Afrikaans-language daily, argued in an editorial that Mandela has, in his 26 years behind bars, "acquired a status that is larger than life," which he would have difficulty maintaining out of jail.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
African National Congress deputy leader Nelson Mandela, celebrating his first Christmas at home in nearly 30 years, appealed to South Africans on Monday to work for peace so blacks never again spend the holiday "in chains." In Pretoria, ANC President Oliver Tambo met for the first time with President F. W. de Klerk. The meeting was described as a "courtesy visit." Afterward, Tambo told reporters he hopes South Africa will have a "full recovery from apartheid" by Christmas next year.
NEWS
December 14, 1993
South Africa's past and future hold opposing holidays on Thursday. Thousands of conservative white Afrikaners will gather for religious services, political speeches, barbecues--and a political show of strength--at the Voortreker Monument outside Pretoria to remember the "Day of the Vow," which commemorates the killing by several hundred Afrikaners of about 3,000 Zulu warriors in an 1838 battle.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thabo Mbeki, a child of the struggle against apartheid who was sent into exile 37 years ago to prepare for black majority rule, became this country's second elected black leader Wednesday, replacing retiring President Nelson Mandela. Mbeki took the oath of office in three languages outside the Union Buildings, the seat of government since 1913 and the center of white minority rule until five years ago.
NEWS
April 25, 1995
A year ago, right-wing bombs rocked the streets and fearful whites loaded up on candles and canned goods in the apocalyptic atmosphere that preceded South Africa's first all-race election. Then, for four remarkable days, millions of first-time black voters lined up in the broiling sun and pelting rain to cast off apartheid and usher in democracy. Thursday, a national holiday called Freedom Day marks the anniversary of that week.
NEWS
December 14, 1993
South Africa's past and future hold opposing holidays on Thursday. Thousands of conservative white Afrikaners will gather for religious services, political speeches, barbecues--and a political show of strength--at the Voortreker Monument outside Pretoria to remember the "Day of the Vow," which commemorates the killing by several hundred Afrikaners of about 3,000 Zulu warriors in an 1838 battle.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
African National Congress deputy leader Nelson Mandela, celebrating his first Christmas at home in nearly 30 years, appealed to South Africans on Monday to work for peace so blacks never again spend the holiday "in chains." In Pretoria, ANC President Oliver Tambo met for the first time with President F. W. de Klerk. The meeting was described as a "courtesy visit." Afterward, Tambo told reporters he hopes South Africa will have a "full recovery from apartheid" by Christmas next year.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 27-year wait for a glimpse of Nelson R. Mandela grew frenzied Monday as school classrooms emptied in black townships around Johannesburg and about 35,000 people showed up at a soccer stadium in Soweto to welcome home the black nationalist leader. But the guest of honor didn't show up.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun rose hot on this black township Sunday morning, but its people did not. After a night of joyous celebrations following the news of Nelson R. Mandela's impending release, no one, it seems, had even gone to sleep. By early morning, this suburban Cape Town settlement was teeming with activity on a day usually reserved for quiet rest and church-going. The scene here and in the neighboring Nyanga township was anything but tranquil.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush telephoned Nelson R. Mandela from the White House on Sunday, told him all Americans "were rejoicing at his release" after 27 years in South Africa's prisons and personally invited him to the White House. "He told me that he wanted to consult some of his colleagues, but that he expected he would be able to accept my invitation," the President told reporters in the Rose Garden late Sunday afternoon. "It was a very friendly conversation," Bush said.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | Reuters
This country's television threw years of racial stereotyping to the winds Sunday with an unprecedented live broadcast of Nelson R. Mandela's walk to freedom. The 71-year-old leader, whose portrait could not even be legally printed in newspapers here until a few days ago, marched out of the gates of his prison and into the homes of millions of South African viewers. The pictures were also beamed live all over the world.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taverns were offering free beer "in honor of Comrade Mandela" in Soweto. "Free Mandela" T-shirts were marked down to fire-sale prices in Cape Town. Car horns blared in the night air, and hundreds of blacks and whites danced in the streets of South Africa on Saturday to celebrate the imminent release of black nationalist Nelson R. Mandela. "Tears came into my eyes and I got goose pimples when I heard," said Nicky Blumenfeld, a 27-year-old white art teacher in Johannesburg.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a biographer of Nelson R. Mandela offered the African National Congress a look at her new book a few months ago, rebel leader Oliver R. Tambo asked her to take out the tender love letters that Mandela had written from prison to his wife, Winnie. "He thought it wasn't dignified for a man of Mandela's stature," recalled author Fatima Meer. But Mandela overruled his former law partner, telling Meer: "You leave it all in. It's true. There's no reason for us to hide these things."
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | Reuters
This country's television threw years of racial stereotyping to the winds Sunday with an unprecedented live broadcast of Nelson R. Mandela's walk to freedom. The 71-year-old leader, whose portrait could not even be legally printed in newspapers here until a few days ago, marched out of the gates of his prison and into the homes of millions of South African viewers. The pictures were also beamed live all over the world.
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