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South Africa Constitutions

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NEWS
March 30, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's fair to say that Alexander Hamilton and America's other founding fathers never surfed the Internet. But the founding fathers and mothers of South Africa's draft constitution have their own Web page, e-mail address, toll-free telephones and much more, all so citizens can get a word in edgewise as basic rights and freedoms are hammered out page by page. And words have come: about 20,000 written, faxed and cyberspace submissions so far.
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WORLD
September 9, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
South African President Jacob Zuma on Thursday brushed aside criticism from gay rights and women's groups and appointed a conservative Christian to head the high court, a move that will affect the country's judicial system for at least a decade. Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng, who told a judicial panel last weekend that he believes God chose him to head the Constitutional Court, is a member of the Winners Chapel, which believes homosexuality is a disease that is "curable. " He has been widely criticized for several legal decisions that threw out jail sentences of men convicted of marital rape or assaulting their girlfriends and reduced the sentences of men convicted of raping children.
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NEWS
April 1, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress and the South African government, in separate pronouncements Tuesday, agreed that an interim government for the country is only months away--but traded sharp words indicating that they still cling to diametrically opposed visions of how a new constitution should be written.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a youth, Simon Nkuli had two strikes against him under the white supremacist system of apartheid and the stern Calvinist morality that underpinned it: He was both black and homosexual. Thus he endured five years in various jails and prisons for his political activism before being acquitted of treason charges in 1988. And he was both tortured and mocked by police, who called him a moffie, a pejorative for gays.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the African National Congress, after three days of closed-door meetings, opted Thursday to maintain their 11-week-old boycott of constitutional talks and maintain pressure on the white government to end violence and free political prisoners. The decision, reached by the ANC's 86-member policy-making body, was heavily influenced by rank-and-file ANC members who are angry about ongoing violence and who doubt that President Frederik W.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months of behind-the-scenes talks between black and white leaders hit a serious snag late Thursday night, dimming hopes of far-reaching agreements at today's historic second meeting of the country's negotiating forum.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiations to end white rule in South Africa suffered a significant setback Friday when a key committee of black and white leaders abandoned attempts to reach agreement on the percentage of votes that would be necessary to adopt a new constitution. The stalemate, after five months of closed-door talks, put the future of the negotiations process in the hands of President Frederik W.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wide-ranging new constitution signed Thursday, designed to bury apartheid and usher in multiracial democracy, is a workable blueprint for government but has dangerous pitfalls for this strife-torn country, analysts say. Several of the document's most controversial provisions were passed with little apparent scrutiny or debate as bleary-eyed delegates rushed to finish the historic accord and begin the contest for the nation's first all-race elections next April 27.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A parliamentary advisory body on Wednesday recommended a constitution for South Africa that would extend voting rights to the black majority but protect the political rights of whites. President Frederik W. de Klerk's government has yet to put forth a formal constitutional proposal. The plan recommended Wednesday loosely resembles other blueprints under consideration.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The militant Pan-Africanist Congress stalked out of multi-party talks with the government and other black groups Saturday, saying it would ask its supporters whether it should continue participating in preparations for constitutional negotiations.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
With the stroke of a pen, President Nelson Mandela signed South Africa's new constitution into law. Then he hoisted it over his head, to the cheers of 4,000 people at a ramshackle soccer stadium in the black township of Sharpeville. The 150-page charter was the culmination of more than six years of negotiations between white and black leaders on the shape and ideology of post-apartheid South Africa.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
South Africa's highest court gave final approval to a new constitution. The 11-member Constitutional Court certified the 150-page document, which is considered one of the most liberal constitutions in the world. It outlaws capital punishment, protects gay and lesbian rights and includes a Bill of Rights that guarantees equal rights for all. An earlier draft of the charter had to be reworked after it was rejected in court earlier this year.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation's highest court refused Friday to approve the new post-apartheid constitution, ruling that it would give too much power to the central government and too little to the nine provinces. The decision by the Constitutional Court, which must certify the document, had been expected. It is unlikely to derail or long delay final ratification of the 2-year-old democracy's governing charter.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
This country adopted a new constitution Wednesday that guarantees equal rights for all and completes South Africa's official transformation from the injustice of apartheid to democracy. The Constitutional Assembly voted 421 to 2 to pass the 150-page document. There were 10 abstentions. "Our pledge is: Never and never again shall the laws of our land rend our people apart or legalize their oppression and repression," President Nelson Mandela said.
NEWS
March 30, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's fair to say that Alexander Hamilton and America's other founding fathers never surfed the Internet. But the founding fathers and mothers of South Africa's draft constitution have their own Web page, e-mail address, toll-free telephones and much more, all so citizens can get a word in edgewise as basic rights and freedoms are hammered out page by page. And words have come: about 20,000 written, faxed and cyberspace submissions so far.
NEWS
February 15, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a sunny morning in April, 1988, when exiled anti-apartheid lawyer Albie Sachs walked to his car in Maputo, Mozambique. As he opened the door, a bomb set by South African security forces turned his red Honda into an inferno of twisted metal. Sachs' right arm was ripped off by the blast. He had four broken ribs, a lacerated liver, torn nerves and ruptured eardrums, and he was shredded with shrapnel. Doctors doubted he could survive.
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 18 months of fragile talks about talks, the government, the African National Congress and the Inkatha Freedom Party announced tentative agreement Thursday on Dec. 20-21 for the first round of formal negotiations on this nation's future. And a meeting of almost two dozen black and white political groups was scheduled for next Friday to prepare for the negotiations, expected to lead to an interim government and a new constitution that will extend voting rights to the black majority.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress declared Saturday that it will not take part in planned constitutional talks with the white-minority-led government until President Frederik W. de Klerk acts decisively to stop violence in black townships and ban the carrying of Zulu spears. But ANC leaders said they will maintain other contacts with the government, including discussions on the violence.
NEWS
December 23, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation's last white-controlled Parliament on Wednesday overwhelmingly adopted a sweeping new constitution that guarantees equal rights to blacks for the first time and officially ends the pernicious policies of apartheid. The approval, in the same ornate chamber where apartheid was institutionalized, was the penultimate step in the difficult march to democracy that began almost four years ago and will culminate in one-person, one-vote elections next April 27.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After four months of talks, taunts and political tumult, a fractious alliance of right-wing whites and conservative blacks failed in a last-ditch attempt Tuesday to delay or win major changes in the democratic constitution that will be adopted here today.
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