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South Africa Courts

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NEWS
February 27, 1999 | Associated Press
A South African judge on Friday rejected an opposition party's argument that a voter registration process was unconstitutional. The National Party, which ruled during apartheid, had challenged a rule that South Africans must use a computer-readable identification document to vote and to register to vote. The party claimed that the rule could disenfranchise millions of people in the nation's second all-race elections.
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WORLD
September 9, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
South African President Jacob Zuma on Thursday brushed aside criticism from gay rights and women's groups and appointed a conservative Christian to head the high court, a move that will affect the country's judicial system for at least a decade. Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng, who told a judicial panel last weekend that he believes God chose him to head the Constitutional Court, is a member of the Winners Chapel, which believes homosexuality is a disease that is "curable. " He has been widely criticized for several legal decisions that threw out jail sentences of men convicted of marital rape or assaulting their girlfriends and reduced the sentences of men convicted of raping children.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonald's Wins Court Order in South Africa: McDonald's Corp. attorney Clifford Green said the Oakbrook, Ill.-based company requested the order on the ground of trademark infringement after a MacDonald's opened earlier in the week in downtown Johannesburg. That restaurant, which reportedly had done a brisk business, had yellow arches and sold hamburgers bearing the same names as those of the U.S. company.
WORLD
February 10, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
South Africans living abroad should get the right to vote, the High Court ruled Monday, a decision that, if upheld, could have profound implications for the fate of the nation's leadership. The country's president-in-waiting, ruling African National Congress chief Jacob Zuma, is to go on trial on corruption charges in August. The ANC needs to keep its two-thirds parliamentary majority in coming elections in order to change the constitution so Zuma can avoid trial as president.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonald's Corp. lost a court battle to use its world-famous name on hamburger restaurants that it plans to open in South Africa. Pretoria Supreme Court Judge B.R. Southwood, saying McDonald's had waited too long without doing business there, upheld a lawsuit by a South African businessman who wants to use McDonald's as the name of his own chain of restaurants.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winnie Mandela was granted permission Tuesday to appeal her convictions for kidnaping and assault, ensuring that it will be at least a year before she has to face the prospect of beginning a six-year prison term. Judge Michael S. Stegmann, who had found Mandela guilty after a three-month trial, said that while he thought his verdict correct, there is a "reasonable prospect" that a higher court might overturn it.
NEWS
June 7, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Constitutional Court abolished the death penalty Tuesday, ending five years of ambiguity and fear for more than 450 prisoners convicted of capital crimes. Arthur Chaskalson, the court president, said the 11 judges had ruled unanimously in their first major decision since the court was officially convened in February to adjudicate constitutional issues.
NEWS
January 19, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
An Indian lawyer who was once banned from South African politics for his anti-apartheid activities has been appointed an acting judge on the Natal provincial Supreme Court, the nation's first nonwhite to hold such a judicial position. Hassan E. Mall, 64, was named to the post by Justice John A. Milne, president of the Natal provincial court, and confirmed by Hendrik J. Coetsee, the minister of justice, amid speculation that Mall would be given a permanent appointment when a vacancy occurred.
NEWS
March 31, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Anti-apartheid activists on trial here for treason Monday asked the presiding judge to declare a mistrial on grounds that his dismissal of one of his two trial assistants effectively denies the defendants a fair hearing. Arthur Chaskalson, head of the legal team for the 19 defendants, told Judge Kees van Dijkhorst that he did not have the power to dismiss Prof. W. A.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Operation Spookvoertuig--Ghost Vehicle--was simple. A soldier and seven policemen armed with Beretta pump-action shotguns hid in crates on a flatbed truck and trolled slowly through the volatile township, waiting for someone to throw the first stone. Sure enough, a chunk of concrete shattered the windshield on a sunny spring afternoon in 1985, the officers popped out of their boxes, and the air rang with gunfire and screams. In 14 seconds, three youngsters were dead and 11 injured.
WORLD
February 5, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
South Africa's high court on Wednesday set an August trial date for Jacob Zuma, leader of the nation's ruling party -- meaning the country may see its next president tried while in office on charges of graft, fraud and corruption. Despite the charges, the dominant African National Congress is sticking with Zuma as its candidate, making it all but certain he'll be the country's president after elections, expected to be held in April.
NEWS
February 27, 1999 | Associated Press
A South African judge on Friday rejected an opposition party's argument that a voter registration process was unconstitutional. The National Party, which ruled during apartheid, had challenged a rule that South Africans must use a computer-readable identification document to vote and to register to vote. The party claimed that the rule could disenfranchise millions of people in the nation's second all-race elections.
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South African Rugby Football Union won a bitterly contested court case Friday against the black-led South African government when a judge ruled that an investigation of the organization was unjustified. Pretoria Supreme Court Justice William de Villiers gave no reasons for his decision to nullify an order by President Nelson Mandela to set up a rugby commission of inquiry.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Desmond Tutu has retired as Anglican archbishop, but in many ways the spiritual leader of the anti-apartheid struggle remains South Africa's moral spokesman. So Tutu's comments carried a sharp sting after the politically charged acquittals Friday of the most senior officials ever tried for apartheid-related crimes. Former Defense Minister Magnus Malan and his top military and intelligence chiefs were cleared of 18 murder, attempted murder and conspiracy charges.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mass murder and conspiracy case against former Defense Minister Magnus Malan and other top military chiefs of the apartheid regime appeared close to collapse Thursday after a judge acquitted six key defendants and branded the main prosecution witnesses as liars. Full acquittals now seem likely when final verdicts are delivered today in the most significant political trial of the post-apartheid era.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonald's Win South Africa Case: The ruling by South Africa's highest court gives the fast-food chain legal protection for its Golden Arches logo and other trademarks registered in the country. A lawyer for Oakbrook, Ill.-based McDonald's Corp. said the ruling means the company can now sue competitors with look-alike restaurants for trademark infringement. He said the decision also sets guidelines for other U.S. companies doing or considering doing business in South Africa.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Desmond Tutu has retired as Anglican archbishop, but in many ways the spiritual leader of the anti-apartheid struggle remains South Africa's moral spokesman. So Tutu's comments carried a sharp sting after the politically charged acquittals Friday of the most senior officials ever tried for apartheid-related crimes. Former Defense Minister Magnus Malan and his top military and intelligence chiefs were cleared of 18 murder, attempted murder and conspiracy charges.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five leading anti-apartheid activists, convicted last year in a historic treason trial that dealt a sharp blow to black protest in South Africa, were freed from prison Friday after the country's highest court overturned their convictions. "We're overjoyed to be back with our families," Popo Molefe, 37, general secretary of the United Democratic Front, said in an interview on the plane taking him home to Johannesburg.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonald's Wins Court Order in South Africa: McDonald's Corp. attorney Clifford Green said the Oakbrook, Ill.-based company requested the order on the ground of trademark infringement after a MacDonald's opened earlier in the week in downtown Johannesburg. That restaurant, which reportedly had done a brisk business, had yellow arches and sold hamburgers bearing the same names as those of the U.S. company.
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