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February 4, 1990 | JEFF SILVERMAN
Athol Fugard's choice of the La Jolla Playhouse for the first West Coast presentation of his latest play, "My Children! My Africa!," may come as something of a surprise to the theater community. Given both his and the Market Theatre's many previous associations with Los Angeles' Mark Taper Forum and its artistic director, Gordon Davidson, La Jolla's announcement last week that it had wooed the play to its stage in July is a testament to tenacity and the powers of direct contact.
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WORLD
December 29, 2012 | Robyn Dixon
When Mickey Mampe needs to charge her cellphone, she jumps on her bicycle and rides 25 miles in the dry, shimmering heat from her non-electrified home on a deserted farm road. Mampe, whose children are grown, is a rare figure in the rural northern Cape region, the only woman with a bike in her remote village. The men in town tease her. But she ignores them and figures she has little choice because she prefers cycling to riding in a bumpy horse cart. "You don't struggle; you just get on," Mampe told a pair of authors.
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NEWS
June 25, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like any good poet, Sithembile Mlanjeni says his inspiration comes from deep inside, surging up to fill his brain and voice with the rolling rhythm and kinetic cadence of Xhosa verse. Unlike most bards, however, Mlanjeni performs barefoot and bare-chested. He waves a cow-tail whisk in one hand and a burl-topped club called a knobkerrie in the other. He wears a jackal skin cap, an intricate bead necklace and a gleaming smile.
WORLD
July 12, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
- She was named Democracy in Zulu, at a time when her country had none. A few years later, the constitution born of the historic South African election that ended apartheid made Nonkululeko "free" and "equal. " But the eight cows paid for her as a bride price mean that she is neither. At 14, Nonkululeko fell victim to a secretive cultural practice called thwala , or bride abduction, that continues here in the eastern province of KwaZulu-Natal. Originally an acceptable means for two young Zulu people in love to wed when their families opposed the match, thwala is often abused to victimize isolated rural women and enrich male relatives, activists say. "It's a distortion of our culture," said Sizani Ngubane, of the Rural Women's Movement, a nongovernmental rights organization.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's impossible to read. Forget about trying to pronounce it. And the meaning? Well, it's best not to ask. South Africa's new national motto looks like an Internet address gone dotty, but that's the least of its troubles. Experts say even its wacky spelling isn't quite right. And critics suggest that it conjures up images of the toilet. The inscription, as it appears on South Africa's newly redesigned coat of arms, reads: !ke e: /xarra //ke.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
A noted South African cancer researcher, facing a recent press conference on the risks of nitrate-cured food, was tripped up by a gnarled piece of dried meat known as biltong. Could biltong snacks, he was asked, be hazardous to your health? Common sense dictated that he douse the pesky question with diplomatic hems and haws. But his credibility as a scientist was on the line. "It was a sticky situation, but I had to admit biltong is one of those foods that should be eaten in moderation," Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT
No one could say that the strict Calvinist folks of South Africa weren't warned about their latest American import, "Basic Instinct." Long before the film arrived, the papers said it was sexually explicit, violent, probably sexist and possibly misogynistic. But, then again, maybe that's why the thriller already has cracked nearly every box-office record in South Africa in just three weeks.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The keepers of the parliamentary record were stumped when a white member rose recently in debate to warn his colleagues about the "hand-in-bosom" policy they were considering. As Parliament's official reporters rushed to save the day's speeches for eternity, they had to chuckle: What, they wondered, did the member of Parliament really mean? It turned out that the speaker, like so many before him, had been tripped up by the literal English translation of an Afrikaans expression.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As military strongholds go, Ft. Klapperkop has little to boast about. It is small and poorly situated and, since its opening 100 years ago today, has been of dubious strategic value. But as powerful symbols go, the brick and brownstone garrison has few rivals in this erstwhile capital of the Transvaal Republic, one of the ill-fated independent states founded in the 1800s by white Afrikaner farmers. Ft.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back when Paul Simon's hit album "Graceland" first brought international fame to the music of oppressed black South Africans, the singer was vilified by anti-apartheid groups and did three weeks' time on the U.N. blacklist for violating the cultural boycott against Pretoria. Now, five years later, Simon is back in South Africa to help end the country's long cultural isolation with a five-concert, four-city tour that begins Saturday night in Johannesburg.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The calling came to Janine Andrews in a dream. An elderly woman appeared clutching a fly swatter made from a cow's tail. She was adorned with colorful beads, copper bangles and pieces of goatskin, the typical dress of a traditional Zulu healer. In an instant, years of struggling to determine her life's vocation became clear to Andrews, a petite blond who is the descendant of European settlers.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's impossible to read. Forget about trying to pronounce it. And the meaning? Well, it's best not to ask. South Africa's new national motto looks like an Internet address gone dotty, but that's the least of its troubles. Experts say even its wacky spelling isn't quite right. And critics suggest that it conjures up images of the toilet. The inscription, as it appears on South Africa's newly redesigned coat of arms, reads: !ke e: /xarra //ke.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the boys, a piece of wire is extended three feet above the ground. They are instructed to pull down their trousers and, without using their hands, urinate above the marker. For the girls, a straw mat is unraveled on the floor of a mud hut. They are required to undress, part their legs and submit to a vaginal exam by a female inspector. "We repeat the tests every month," said the Rev.
NEWS
November 30, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is nothing like the story of a bloody giraffe to catch the attention of 200 Mercedes-Benz service managers after their morning coffee. Not just any giraffe tale will do. It must come from the lips of Quinton Coetzee, South Africa's swashbuckling survival specialist who uses lessons from the bush to warn desk-bound workers to compete, or die. The Indiana Jones look-alike is among a small corps of back-to-nature gurus transforming the way South African companies think about the bottom line.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As military strongholds go, Ft. Klapperkop has little to boast about. It is small and poorly situated and, since its opening 100 years ago today, has been of dubious strategic value. But as powerful symbols go, the brick and brownstone garrison has few rivals in this erstwhile capital of the Transvaal Republic, one of the ill-fated independent states founded in the 1800s by white Afrikaner farmers. Ft.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wearing only a leather loincloth and a headband adorned with beads made from ostrich eggs, Buks squats beneath a rock cliff and patiently strings a hunting bow. Half-naked men, women and children, all slightly built with dark yellow skin and heart-shaped faces, huddle around in the easy intimacy of an extended hunter-gatherer family. The scene is little changed from the Stone Age.
NEWS
May 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sue Ingram felt sick with fear. She didn't know where she would sleep or what she would eat. She imagined bugs crawling around her feet and throngs of black people who might resent her, even kill her. Her bags stood beside the door of her warm, secure home. She had packed carefully, nothing too fancy but nothing too casual, either.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sun City preserves its fondest memories in a deserted corridor away from the slot machines' jingle. Barry Manilow and Frank Sinatra are there on well-lighted posters. So are George Benson and Dolly Parton, Chicago and Queen, Cher and Liza. All have been "live at Sun City," playing for the world's biggest money in the Super Bowl, Africa's best-equipped music hall. On one memorable evening, Elton John, on his way out of town, sat down to play piano for Rod Stewart, who had just arrived.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apartheid may be over, but ugly racism still separates neighbors Hempies van Rooyan, a gun-toting white Afrikaner, and Ma Maloi, a sharp-tongued black African matriarch. Van Rooyan says all blacks look alike and steal. Maloi says all whites drink and have strong body odor. "You Pondo pygmy!" Van Rooyan shouts over the backyard fence. "You racist baboon!" Maloi thunders back. Meet South Africa's newest, least likely heroes: the cast of "Suburban Bliss."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1995 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Late in Athol Fugard's new play, "Valley Song," one of the characters, identified in the program as simply "the Author," says: "The truth is I'm not as brave about change as I'd like to be. It involves letting go of things, and I've discovered that is a lot harder than I thought it was."
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