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South Africa Demonstrations

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NEWS
March 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
The African National Congress showed strong support among Zulus on Friday, drawing more than 100,000 people to two marches demanding free political activity in Natal province and the traditional Zulu homeland. The marches in Durban and Stanger ended with little of the unrest that had been expected from holding ANC rallies in territory controlled by the Zulu nationalist Inkatha Freedom Party, the ANC's bitter rival.
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NEWS
March 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
The African National Congress showed strong support among Zulus on Friday, drawing more than 100,000 people to two marches demanding free political activity in Natal province and the traditional Zulu homeland. The marches in Durban and Stanger ended with little of the unrest that had been expected from holding ANC rallies in territory controlled by the Zulu nationalist Inkatha Freedom Party, the ANC's bitter rival.
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NEWS
January 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
Riot police with attack dogs today beat and dispersed scores of anti-apartheid protesters led by Winnie Mandela who demonstrated against an English cricket team defying a ban on sports ties with South Africa. Dozens of police, wielding batons and spraying tear gas, charged into about 100 mostly black protesters who tried to enter the international terminal at Jan Smuts Airport to protest the arrival of the English team.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
Riot police with attack dogs today beat and dispersed scores of anti-apartheid protesters led by Winnie Mandela who demonstrated against an English cricket team defying a ban on sports ties with South Africa. Dozens of police, wielding batons and spraying tear gas, charged into about 100 mostly black protesters who tried to enter the international terminal at Jan Smuts Airport to protest the arrival of the English team.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
An official of the African National Congress was shot and killed Tuesday as she entered her Paris office, and the incident quickly set off anti-South Africa demonstrations in the city. South African Foreign Minister Roloef (Pik) Botha, in a statement issued through his government's embassy in Paris, said that South Africa was not responsible for the killing, but his denial did not quiet the accusations that South African agents had fired the bullets.
NEWS
May 17, 1985 | MARK A. STEIN and ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writers
About 1,500 apartheid opponents rallied outside a University of California regents meeting Thursday, and the peaceful mood that prevailed for most of the day was broken when about 400 protesters confronted the regents after the meeting and were forced out of the way by a flying wedge of campus police. Police and protesters exchanged some punches as the regents' chauffeur-driven cars left the Lawrence Hall of Science, the remote hilltop building where the heavily guarded meeting was held.
OPINION
June 17, 1990 | Sanford J. Ungar, Sanford J. Ungar, dean of the School of Communication at American University, is the author of "Africa: The People and Politics of an Emerging Continent" (Touchstone/Simon & Schuster)
Foreign policy is full of ironies, but few are as sharp as one that will be played out this week when a black leader from South Africa begins a triumphant 12-day tour of the United States. Twenty-eight years ago, the Central Intelligence Agency fingered Nelson Mandela for the South African government, which sent him to prison. On Wednesday, the same man--only four months after being released--will be given a hero's welcome with a ticker-tape parade in New York.
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