Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouth Africa Economy
IN THE NEWS

South Africa Economy

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 6, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is stepping for the first time into the uncertain but potentially lucrative business of trying to guide the economic resurgence of a newly democratic South Africa. But the job of redrawing the nation's economy in a way that ensures that the transition to democracy translates into fundamental improvements in living standards for all South Africans is easier said than done.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What do you wish for when the money in your wallet has lost nearly a quarter of its value in the past several weeks and experts warn that the squeeze is not over? A weekend. South Africans of all colors, means and political persuasions--even those with no interest in things religious--were basking Sunday in the Day of the Lord, perhaps more appropriately known in recent weeks as the Day of the Merciful Currency Gods.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A lot of misconceptions about South Africa's economy are surfacing during Nelson Mandela's U.S. tour. While the South African leader is acclaimed by crowds everywhere, he encounters misgivings from U.S. business people when he talks about his country's economic future. Americans hear him speak of a "mixed economy" with some state ownership--as he did Tuesday addressing a joint session of Congress--and think that he is out to bring Socialism to a free-enterprise system.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1996
South Africa Growth at 7-Year High: The country's economy grew by 3.3% in 1995, compared with 2.7% in 1994, the Central Statistical Service said. But the pace of growth in gross domestic product slowed somewhat in the fourth quarter as manufacturing started to run up against capacity constraints. Most economists said the recovery should regain momentum this year, buoyed by a strong rebound in agriculture after parched farms received the best rains in years. Annualized GDP growth dipped to 2.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1994 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. companies will lose out on investment opportunities in the new South Africa--deals that their Japanese and European counterparts will seize--unless American business becomes more aggressive, South Africa's U.S. ambassador said Tuesday in Los Angeles. Although U.S.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | CHRIS McGREAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the three weeks since President Nelson Mandela's inauguration, a host of international organizations has rushed to embrace South Africa. The country's new flag flies in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, at the headquarters of the Organization of African Unity, once one of apartheid's bitterest enemies. On Wednesday, South Africa rejoined the British Commonwealth, more than three decades after it stormed out because of Commonwealth objections to its racist political system.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first it seemed quixotic. But today, billions of dollars in California pension funds have been pulled out of South Africa. And as Nelson Mandela concluded his U.S. tour, people who set out to force California to pull its money out of South Africa were basking in the belief that they played a part in freeing the anti-apartheid leader. "It's an affirmation of our work," Pedro Noguera said of Mandela's visit.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, determined to prevent the failure of South Africa's experiment in multiracial democracy, will try to persuade American businesses, pension funds and other institutions to pour billions of dollars into the country's fragile economy after next month's elections, officials said Tuesday. The White House decided to build its South Africa policy around private investment because the U.S.
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The giant Anglo American Corp., hit hardest in a three-week-old strike by South Africa's black miners, and the National Union of Mineworkers resumed negotiations Friday following the company's dismissal of nearly a quarter of its work force in the pay dispute. The two sides, both bruised in the strike, indicated they had made some progress in an effort to break the prolonged deadlock over wages, the main issue in the often violent dispute, and planned formal bargaining talks for Sunday.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the larger strikes in South African history, several million blacks stayed home from work Monday, shutting down factories and crippling businesses to protest a new sales tax and the lack of a black say in government economic policy. "A referendum was held in the streets of our country today," declared Jay Naidoo, leader of the Congress of South African Trade Unions, a 1.2-million-member labor federation and key strike organizer.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Nelson Mandela sounded grateful, to say the least, when he delivered a brief speech of welcome at a conference for potential foreign investors in a hotel ballroom here this week. Mandela repeatedly and effusively thanked the 200 or so business leaders, bankers and financial analysts "from the bottom of our hearts" for attending the session.
NEWS
July 8, 1995 | SUDARSAN RAGHAVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Imagine this: You're watching a ball bounce around a spinning roulette wheel inside a posh casino. Lights are flashing, slot machines are ringing, cocktail glasses are clinking. But you're not in Las Vegas or Monaco. You're in Maputo, the capital of Mozambique--one of Africa's poorest countries, devastated by 16 years of civil war. You win $100--roughly equal to the nation's per capita gross domestic product.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Socially responsible funds aren't usually pitched on their investment returns. The New Africa Fund, a new open-ended mutual fund, hopes to change that. "This is the first time the politically correct thing to do, the socially correct thing to do and the economically correct thing to do are all the same," Justin Beckett, the manager of the New Africa Fund, told the Bloomberg Forum. The fund was launched by the Calvert Group, a Bethesda, Md.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1994 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. companies will lose out on investment opportunities in the new South Africa--deals that their Japanese and European counterparts will seize--unless American business becomes more aggressive, South Africa's U.S. ambassador said Tuesday in Los Angeles. Although U.S.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is stepping for the first time into the uncertain but potentially lucrative business of trying to guide the economic resurgence of a newly democratic South Africa. But the job of redrawing the nation's economy in a way that ensures that the transition to democracy translates into fundamental improvements in living standards for all South Africans is easier said than done.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | CHRIS McGREAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the three weeks since President Nelson Mandela's inauguration, a host of international organizations has rushed to embrace South Africa. The country's new flag flies in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, at the headquarters of the Organization of African Unity, once one of apartheid's bitterest enemies. On Wednesday, South Africa rejoined the British Commonwealth, more than three decades after it stormed out because of Commonwealth objections to its racist political system.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a historic day for South Africa's black liberation struggle, Nelson Mandela on Friday took his case to United Nations diplomats and to captains of American industry, drawing vigorous standing ovations as he pleaded for emotional and financial support. The political prisoner turned world statesman, addressing the most influential audiences since his arrival in the United States three days ago, urged the United Nations to resist any temptation to ease Pretoria's isolation.
NEWS
July 9, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story is told here of a top executive of a subsidiary of the giant Anglo American Corp. who stood up at a board meeting and asked, "Gentlemen, which one of you wants this company to be remembered as the IG Farben of apartheid?" The reference to the industrial engine of Nazi Germany was a telling one. For no corporation dominates its national economy the way Anglo American does. And no company has as much at stake in moving this country out of the era of apartheid.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|