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South Africa Education

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NEWS
August 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police in Soweto township fired tear gas to disperse about 150 black children who staged a protest march over conditions in township schools on the eve of a planned takeover of three vacant white schools. The National Education Coordinating Committee said it planned to occupy the schools "as a last-ditch attempt . . . to find an interim solution" to South Africa's education crisis. Although apartheid laws have been repealed, schools remain segregated.
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WORLD
July 20, 2004 | Davan Maharaj, Times Staff Writer
The note sent home with the 922 students of Silwanetshe Primary School was clear: Pay up or drop out. The next morning, about 500 children whose parents couldn't afford the $10 annual fee were absent. When classes began, 11-year-old Mduduzi Mkhize and his sisters, Precious, 10, and Zinhle, 8, could only press against the wire fence that separates their mud hut from the school grounds.
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NEWS
February 23, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixteen black children, freshly scrubbed and in prim new uniforms, marched nervously past riot police and a fence topped with razor wire here Thursday to desegregate a public primary school, smashing a racial barrier that has stood for more than a century. The Potgietersrus Primary School was nearly empty, however, because most of its approximately 700 white students stayed home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2001 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the things Akosua Hobert saw while visiting South Africa, it was what she did not see that haunted her most. Students packed the classrooms of the five-school complex in the rural community of Riba Cross. But there were no books. Teachers taught without them. Children learned without them. And the entire town lived without ever experiencing the joy of stepping inside a building dedicated to books; the nearest library was miles away.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Magiliweni Alson Matukane suddenly twisted around in the passenger seat and pointed out the car's rear window. "Did you see the car following us?" the 43-year-old black engineer asked nervously. The vehicle, if it really was chasing him, turned at the corner and Matukane added softly: "It's always scary. You never know. We still have the old South Africa here." His fear is real.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
When Betsy Stelck visited South Africa with her husband in 1965, it was a country of contrasts, a racially divided nation where black children were routinely denied the educational opportunities provided to whites. Thirty-one years later, the veteran educator returned to the post-apartheid nation not as a tourist but a participant in a summit designed to improve the state of South African education.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
In its biggest effort yet to improve black living standards, the South African government announced plans Monday for more than $550 million in new housing, schools and other community facilities in strife-torn Natal province.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Black children returned to school by the hundreds of thousands Wednesday in what the government and community leaders hope will be the end to more than two years of class boycotts that have fueled civil unrest and threatened to produce a "lost generation" of uneducated black youths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2001 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the things Akosua Hobert saw while visiting South Africa, it was what she did not see that haunted her most. Students packed the classrooms of the five-school complex in the rural community of Riba Cross. But there were no books. Teachers taught without them. Children learned without them. And the entire town lived without ever experiencing the joy of stepping inside a building dedicated to books; the nearest library was miles away.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela and South African President Frederik W. de Klerk agreed in Cape Town that the country's segregated school system needs a radical overhaul. They also agreed to form a joint committee to work toward equal education. The committee is expected to make recommendations within six weeks.
NEWS
February 11, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing at her blackboard, Irene Nkwanyana has no textbooks for her fifth-grade history class at the Nkholi Primary School. She is making history instead. "In the past, I had to teach what the government wanted or I would be arrested," said Nkwanyana, who has taught black children for 30 years. "I had to teach that the black man was inferior." No longer. This year, for the first time, she has discarded textbooks that portray whites as civilized and blacks as primitive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Lorena A. Alvarez has begun collecting books for her journey to South Africa next month. She's not going there to read, though. She will be making history as part of the first Peace Corps volunteer group to go to that nation. As part of her mission, Alvarez will help teachers in a small urban village north of Pretoria on instructing their students in mathematics and science. She said she also hopes to help residents open a library if none exists or expand whatever facility is already in place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
When Betsy Stelck visited South Africa with her husband in 1965, it was a country of contrasts, a racially divided nation where black children were routinely denied the educational opportunities provided to whites. Thirty-one years later, the veteran educator returned to the post-apartheid nation not as a tourist but a participant in a summit designed to improve the state of South African education.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixteen black children, freshly scrubbed and in prim new uniforms, marched nervously past riot police and a fence topped with razor wire here Thursday to desegregate a public primary school, smashing a racial barrier that has stood for more than a century. The Potgietersrus Primary School was nearly empty, however, because most of its approximately 700 white students stayed home.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Magiliweni Alson Matukane suddenly twisted around in the passenger seat and pointed out the car's rear window. "Did you see the car following us?" the 43-year-old black engineer asked nervously. The vehicle, if it really was chasing him, turned at the corner and Matukane added softly: "It's always scary. You never know. We still have the old South Africa here." His fear is real.
NEWS
April 23, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the stench of raw sewage wafts over her home, Grace Phaka knows exactly what she wants when the long-dreamed-for day of liberation finally arrives here on the edge of South Africa's oldest black township. "A real toilet," she said firmly. Then she points to the outdoor tap that she and her husband share with 20 other families. "And clean water." Their house is a two-room shanty with no windows, across from a weed-filled graveyard used as a trash heap and dumping ground for outhouses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Lorena A. Alvarez has begun collecting books for her journey to South Africa next month. She's not going there to read, though. She will be making history as part of the first Peace Corps volunteer group to go to that nation. As part of her mission, Alvarez will help teachers in a small urban village north of Pretoria on instructing their students in mathematics and science. She said she also hopes to help residents open a library if none exists or expand whatever facility is already in place.
NEWS
April 23, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the stench of raw sewage wafts over her home, Grace Phaka knows exactly what she wants when the long-dreamed-for day of liberation finally arrives here on the edge of South Africa's oldest black township. "A real toilet," she said firmly. Then she points to the outdoor tap that she and her husband share with 20 other families. "And clean water." Their house is a two-room shanty with no windows, across from a weed-filled graveyard used as a trash heap and dumping ground for outhouses.
NEWS
November 9, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
School spirit may be the only thing intact at Morris Isaacson High School, a cradle of South Africa's long freedom struggle. The dusty cluster of brick barracks, where black students led the famed 1976 Soweto uprising that launched the battle against apartheid, has few books or chalkboards. Vandals have broken most of the windows, ripped out the light fixtures and punched gaping holes in the walls and ceilings. "Even if we don't have windows and doors, we try," says teacher Thabo Mohlabai.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police in Soweto township fired tear gas to disperse about 150 black children who staged a protest march over conditions in township schools on the eve of a planned takeover of three vacant white schools. The National Education Coordinating Committee said it planned to occupy the schools "as a last-ditch attempt . . . to find an interim solution" to South Africa's education crisis. Although apartheid laws have been repealed, schools remain segregated.
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