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South Africa Elections

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BUSINESS
June 14, 1994 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
AST Research likes to think that in its own small way, it helped bring about democracy in South Africa. That's because 400 of its Premmia personal computers were used by that nation's Independent Electoral Commission to register voters leading up to last month's elections. The Irvine-based company produced the computers that were used to log the names and other information for temporary voter cards to keep the elections free and fair.
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WORLD
April 26, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
The governing African National Congress won South Africa's elections by a huge margin, according to final results announced Saturday, but fell short of the symbolically important two-thirds majority. And in a significant blow, it lost control of the Western Cape to the main opposition party, the Democratic Alliance. The ANC's victory was expected, and attention had focused on whether it would continue to maintain the psychological advantage gained by winning at least two-thirds of the vote.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1994 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's first-ever all-race elections in South Africa will draw special coverage from network, cable and public television outlets as well as KCAL-TV Channel 9. Voting is scheduled to be conducted Tuesday through Thursday. ABC's Peter Jennings is the only anchorman from the three major broadcast networks who will be in South Africa this week, although CBS' Dan Rather was there last week to work on a series of reports that are scheduled to continue through Wednesday.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
President Thabo Mbeki lashed out at South Africa's mainly white and mixed-race opposition party bloc after it made big gains in local elections, calling it an "unholy alliance" that is bad for the nation. Mbeki told a victory rally for the ruling African National Congress, or ANC, in Johannesburg that any headway made by the Democratic Alliance could not discredit the will of the overwhelming majority. But analysts said the outcome signaled an alarming rise in racial divisions.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Police using whips and dogs broke up a protest march Tuesday in the sleepy white college town of Stellenbosch, and hundreds of thousands of voteless blacks nationwide began a two-day strike on the eve of elections that will be the most severe test of white support for the government since it came to power 41 years ago.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Amid a large outbreak of racial unrest and a nationwide strike by blacks, South African whites dealt the ruling National Party a sharp blow at the polls Wednesday, loosening its grip on Parliament and leaving it the smallest majority since it came to power by a narrow margin 41 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
As if reality weren't dramatic enough. During Wednesday's edition of "The CBS Evening News" and Thursday's morning news on CNN, a military trumpeter was heard playing baleful taps as a dignified Julie Nixon Eisenhower, finally surrendering to tears in the closing moments of her father's poignant funeral, received a folded U.S. flag from a major general.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democracy dawned with a flourish across South Africa on Tuesday as hospital patients, pensioners, the disabled and other "special voters" flocked to this country's first all-race polls in unexpectedly high numbers and remarkably good spirits. The opening day of the historic three-day election for the post-apartheid government was marred by widespread confusion and hundreds of complaints of logistic problems and technical glitches at urban and rural polling stations.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Nelson Mandela began shaping South Africa's first post-apartheid government Tuesday, but his formal election in Parliament will be delayed three days because of the glacially slow counting, by hand, of millions of paper ballots from last week's all-race elections. Mandela, who claimed victory Monday night and led the nation in a night of rejoicing, met privately early Tuesday with the lame-duck white president, Frederik W. de Klerk.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
President Pieter W. Botha's surprise "courtesy visit" with jailed nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela drew widely divergent reaction Sunday, with anti-apartheid leaders calling it a "cheap government scheme" to raise false hopes for Mandela's release and others applauding it as a first step toward a peaceful settlement of South Africa's problems.
NEWS
July 3, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the Congress of South African Students, meeting here this week, are pledging to make the Western Cape province "ungovernable." Expect picketing, boycotts, sickouts and strikes in the coming weeks, they warn. Teachers and other trade union groups, who last month led a march on the provincial legislature, are considering further disruptions. Some extremists, according to one report, have even threatened to burn down this city.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | From Associated Press
The African National Congress won solid control of South Africa's Parliament, but final election results Monday showed that it failed to win the power to change the constitution. The ANC came up just one vote short of the two-thirds margin needed to unilaterally amend the constitution. The ANC had denied suggestions by opposition parties that it wanted to do so to amass greater power.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ruling African National Congress has scored a resounding victory in this country's second multiracial elections, winning almost 66% of the national vote and at least seven of the nine provincial legislatures, according to incomplete returns today. Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, who is certain to succeed retiring President Nelson Mandela on June 16, greeted the news with reserve and excitement during a celebration at a conference center north of here. "The people have spoken!"
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pharmacy manager who interrupted Shamiela Isaacs' job interview for a cashier's position didn't mince words. The post was open only to black people, he advised, so the interviewer might as well quit wasting Isaacs' time. The discussion came to a halt and Isaacs, 20, a woman of mixed race and an experienced cashier, was bluntly informed by the white interviewer that she would not get the job. She was not suitable.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY and ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a vote celebrated for its ordinariness, South Africans turned out in large numbers Wednesday in their second national and provincial elections since the end of white minority rule. Definitive results were not expected until today, but independent pollsters have predicted that the ruling African National Congress will win handily.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man expected to be the next president of South Africa, Thabo Mbeki, wears smart suits and boasts a British education. He can recite the poetry of William Butler Yeats by heart. He was married in an English castle and has lived half his 56 years outside South Africa. But home is here in the rolling hills of the secluded Eastern Cape, where people favor mud huts and English is the language of outsiders.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of heavily armed South African army commandos patrolled this riot-torn homeland capital on foot and in huge armored vehicles Saturday, welcomed for the first time as liberators against a repressive regime that had tried to keep blacks from voting in next month's democratic elections. Sent to restore order after a popular uprising here, the army's role is likely to grow following an unprecedented decision in Pretoria to oust Bophuthatswana's despotic leader, Lucas Mangope.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | From Associated Press
The African National Congress won solid control of South Africa's Parliament, but final election results Monday showed that it failed to win the power to change the constitution. The ANC came up just one vote short of the two-thirds margin needed to unilaterally amend the constitution. The ANC had denied suggestions by opposition parties that it wanted to do so to amass greater power.
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Election day in this village off the main highway from Pretoria will be a nuts-and-bolts affair. Most everyone who goes to the polls Wednesday is expected to mark the second box from the top: African National Congress. "Many expectations from the last vote have not been met," said Jabulani Mtsweni, a local ANC activist who has been canvassing voters. "But we've been patient for 350 years--why can't we be patient for another five?"
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As leader of this country's fastest-growing opposition party, Bantu Holomisa is a man with reason to worry. Earlier this year, he buried a top party official assassinated in KwaZulu-Natal, a coastal province where supporters of his United Democratic Movement and the ruling African National Congress have been locked in a bloody power struggle since the opposition group's founding two years ago. The day after the assassination, 11 ANC supporters were slain in an apparent revenge attack.
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