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South Africa Foreign Investments

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BUSINESS
May 31, 1988 | Associated Press
About 1,270 companies from 20 Western countries are doing business in South Africa but 188 companies from seven countries have pulled out, according to a survey published Monday. The International Confederation of Free Trade Unions survey said Britain led the field with 374 companies still operating in South Africa. It said the United States led the countries that pulled out with 134 companies.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hilton Plans South Africa Hotel/Casino: The Beverly Hills-based company said it signed a preliminary agreement to develop the 500-room facility with a large South African company. The casino, which will have 75,000 to 100,000 square feet of gambling space, will be built between Pretoria and Johannesburg and will probably open in the first half of 1998. Hilton Hotels Corp. Executive Vice President F.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1993 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international construction management firm under FBI investigation for allegedly double-billing several government clients statewide failed to disclose business ties to South Africa when bidding to oversee the $92-million renovation of Los Angeles City Hall, officials said Tuesday. Lehrer McGovern Bovis, whose Los Angeles and Thousand Oaks offices were searched last week as part of a broad federal fraud investigation, declared in March that it does no business in South Africa.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Nelson Mandela sounded grateful, to say the least, when he delivered a brief speech of welcome at a conference for potential foreign investors in a hotel ballroom here this week. Mandela repeatedly and effusively thanked the 200 or so business leaders, bankers and financial analysts "from the bottom of our hearts" for attending the session.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The largest South African labor federation called Saturday for the withdrawal of all foreign companies operating here and for the imposition of comprehensive economic sanctions against this country in an effort to hasten the end of apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1989
First Boston Inc. withdrew Tuesday from a Los Angeles municipal bond deal to finance expansion of the Convention Center after Mayor Tom Bradley and City Council members objected that a majority stockholder in the firm does business in South Africa. The investment banking firm was part of a syndicate of 11 investment firms purchasing $350 million in bonds to finance enlarging the center from 1.5 million to 4 million square feet.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is stepping for the first time into the uncertain but potentially lucrative business of trying to guide the economic resurgence of a newly democratic South Africa. But the job of redrawing the nation's economy in a way that ensures that the transition to democracy translates into fundamental improvements in living standards for all South Africans is easier said than done.
NEWS
February 12, 1988
Western economic sanctions against South Africa have failed to isolate the country or hasten reform of apartheid, the country's leading central banker said. Gerhard de Kock, governor of the Reserve Bank, told foreign reporters that sanctions and withdrawals by foreign firms have, if anything, helped slow the cautious reforms implemented by President Pieter W. Botha.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress on Saturday formally rejected internal recommendations that it soften its stand on sanctions, and it asked world leaders to consult the black liberation movement before lifting sanctions on Pretoria.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Nelson Mandela sounded grateful, to say the least, when he delivered a brief speech of welcome at a conference for potential foreign investors in a hotel ballroom here this week. Mandela repeatedly and effusively thanked the 200 or so business leaders, bankers and financial analysts "from the bottom of our hearts" for attending the session.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Socially responsible funds aren't usually pitched on their investment returns. The New Africa Fund, a new open-ended mutual fund, hopes to change that. "This is the first time the politically correct thing to do, the socially correct thing to do and the economically correct thing to do are all the same," Justin Beckett, the manager of the New Africa Fund, told the Bloomberg Forum. The fund was launched by the Calvert Group, a Bethesda, Md.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is stepping for the first time into the uncertain but potentially lucrative business of trying to guide the economic resurgence of a newly democratic South Africa. But the job of redrawing the nation's economy in a way that ensures that the transition to democracy translates into fundamental improvements in living standards for all South Africans is easier said than done.
NEWS
September 25, 1993 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among major economic powers and Third World nations, sanctions against South Africa took on global importance during the late 1980s and affected some of the most basic consumer purchases in the white-ruled country, experts say. At the height of the movement, the vast majority of the world's nations enforced at least some sanctions against Pretoria, led by Australia, Denmark, Britain, Nigeria, Sweden and the United States, said William Moses of the Investor Responsibility Research Center Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A construction management firm with indirect ties to South Africa used its political muscle Wednesday to win an exemption from Los Angeles' anti-apartheid policy and a sought-after contract to renovate Los Angeles City Hall. In an 11-2 vote, the Los Angeles City Council waived its policy and selected Lehrer McGovern Bovis Inc. for a $3-million contract managing the seismic and historical upgrade of the 65-year-old City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1993 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international construction management firm under FBI investigation for allegedly double-billing several government clients statewide failed to disclose business ties to South Africa when bidding to oversee the $92-million renovation of Los Angeles City Hall, officials said Tuesday. Lehrer McGovern Bovis, whose Los Angeles and Thousand Oaks offices were searched last week as part of a broad federal fraud investigation, declared in March that it does no business in South Africa.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress on Saturday formally rejected internal recommendations that it soften its stand on sanctions, and it asked world leaders to consult the black liberation movement before lifting sanctions on Pretoria.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hilton Plans South Africa Hotel/Casino: The Beverly Hills-based company said it signed a preliminary agreement to develop the 500-room facility with a large South African company. The casino, which will have 75,000 to 100,000 square feet of gambling space, will be built between Pretoria and Johannesburg and will probably open in the first half of 1998. Hilton Hotels Corp. Executive Vice President F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A construction management firm with indirect ties to South Africa used its political muscle Wednesday to win an exemption from Los Angeles' anti-apartheid policy and a sought-after contract to renovate Los Angeles City Hall. In an 11-2 vote, the Los Angeles City Council waived its policy and selected Lehrer McGovern Bovis Inc. for a $3-million contract managing the seismic and historical upgrade of the 65-year-old City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1989
First Boston Inc. withdrew Tuesday from a Los Angeles municipal bond deal to finance expansion of the Convention Center after Mayor Tom Bradley and City Council members objected that a majority stockholder in the firm does business in South Africa. The investment banking firm was part of a syndicate of 11 investment firms purchasing $350 million in bonds to finance enlarging the center from 1.5 million to 4 million square feet.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1988 | Associated Press
About 1,270 companies from 20 Western countries are doing business in South Africa but 188 companies from seven countries have pulled out, according to a survey published Monday. The International Confederation of Free Trade Unions survey said Britain led the field with 374 companies still operating in South Africa. It said the United States led the countries that pulled out with 134 companies.
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