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South Africa Foreign Policy

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NEWS
April 26, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since winning the country's first all-race elections two years ago today, Nelson Mandela's government has won high marks abroad for its deft handling of post-apartheid domestic problems, from integrating the military to defusing militant labor unions. But its foreign policy has been marked by embarrassments and affronts to friendly Western governments.
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OPINION
March 23, 2007
IF SOUTH AFRICA'S foreign policy continues on its present course, a nation that has been a relative beacon of African development and democracy since overthrowing apartheid in 1994 runs the risk of becoming an international pariah.
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OPINION
March 23, 2007
IF SOUTH AFRICA'S foreign policy continues on its present course, a nation that has been a relative beacon of African development and democracy since overthrowing apartheid in 1994 runs the risk of becoming an international pariah.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since winning the country's first all-race elections two years ago today, Nelson Mandela's government has won high marks abroad for its deft handling of post-apartheid domestic problems, from integrating the military to defusing militant labor unions. But its foreign policy has been marked by embarrassments and affronts to friendly Western governments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1994 | NELSON MANDELA, Nelson Mandela's commentary was excerpted from the forthcoming "The Post Cold War Order: Views of the World's Political Power Elite," a compilation of essays edited by Keith Philip Lepor
We are, to use a famous phrase from another transition in history, present at the creation. Because this is so, there is a need to develop a sense of orderliness in the world. To do so, a direct link needs to be established between responsible membership of the community of nations and global stability and progress. The converse is also true; if countries want to enjoy the rights of community, they need to act responsibly.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
The Senate Wednesday unanimously authorized a four-year, $52.4-billion program for federal highway and transportation projects, laying the groundwork for final passage by Congress within the next two weeks. Sens. Steven D. Symms (R-Ida.) and Robert T. Stafford (R-Vt.
WORLD
March 1, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
  The African National Congress expelled Julius Malema, the president of its youth wing, on Wednesday for sowing divisions and bringing disrepute to the South African ruling party. The controversial Malema clashed with the leadership of the ANC and lost. His problems are not over: Multiple investigations of his alleged financial misdeeds are underway. Wednesday's decision is subject to appeal but, if upheld, would leave Malema little alternative but to start his own party.
OPINION
February 11, 1990 | JESSE JACKSON, Jesse Jackson writes a syndicated column from Washington
The dirty and unspoken secret of American foreign policy is the "R" word. It is not uttered in polite society, but nothing else can explain our government's often cruel and contradictory policies. Racism disregards black lives, and black lives are being lost daily in southern Africa because of callous policy decisions made by the Bush Administration.
OPINION
July 29, 2007 | James Kirchick, James Kirchick is assistant to the editor in chief of the New Republic
In early may, just a month before the Hamas takeover of the Gaza Strip, South African Minister of Intelligence Ronnie Kasrils paid a visit to Ismail Haniyeh, the Hamas leader and erstwhile Palestinian Authority prime minister. Kasrils praised Hamas, which has been designated by the United States as a terrorist organization, and invited Haniyeh to visit South Africa. Several months earlier, Kasrils did similar PR work on behalf of Hezbollah, another U.S.-designated terrorist group.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newspapers in Nigeria breathlessly reported a few years ago that the South African army planned to bomb Africa's most populous country because of Nigeria's tough stand against apartheid. Of course, South Africa never planned such an attack. But Nigerians, like most people in Africa, figured the evil, white-controlled regime in Pretoria was capable of anything. Now, Nigerian newspapers are worried about South Africa again.
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