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June 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A cheering General Assembly readmitted South Africa, now a non-racial, democratic state, as a full member, ending 20 bitter years of banishment and pariah status because of apartheid. "The long night of diplomatic isolation has finally come to an end," South African Foreign Minister Alfred Nzo told the assembly. The 184-nation assembly decided by acclamation to seat the new black-majority government of Nelson Mandela that won the nation's first all-race elections in April.
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NEWS
June 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A cheering General Assembly readmitted South Africa, now a non-racial, democratic state, as a full member, ending 20 bitter years of banishment and pariah status because of apartheid. "The long night of diplomatic isolation has finally come to an end," South African Foreign Minister Alfred Nzo told the assembly. The 184-nation assembly decided by acclamation to seat the new black-majority government of Nelson Mandela that won the nation's first all-race elections in April.
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NEWS
December 15, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
African National Congress President Oliver R. Tambo, opening a historic nationwide ANC conference Friday, urged his black liberation movement to consider for the first time softening its stand on sanctions against South Africa. "It is no longer enough for us to repeat the tired slogans," said Tambo, 73, delivering the first speech since his return Thursday from 30 years in exile. "We should . . .
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many people here, the raft of indictments handed up last November by a U.S. grand jury against a key South African company appeared to be the end of an era. The company was Armscor, the state-owned arms maker and arms merchant. For the second time it was being charged with receiving as much as $30 million in U.S. munitions between 1978 and 1989 in violation of an international arms embargo and with diverting some of the materiel to Iraq.
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many people here, the raft of indictments handed up last November by a U.S. grand jury against a key South African company appeared to be the end of an era. The company was Armscor, the state-owned arms maker and arms merchant. For the second time it was being charged with receiving as much as $30 million in U.S. munitions between 1978 and 1989 in violation of an international arms embargo and with diverting some of the materiel to Iraq.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government's decision to release Nelson R. Mandela was triggered by years of mounting worldwide pressure for apartheid reform and--more than anything else--by a growing realization among South Africa's 5 million whites that their privileged life under a minority government is doomed.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only four years ago, Pretoria was the target of world rage. A package of U.S. sanctions was biting down hard, African governments were demanding even greater isolation and the South African ambassador to the United Nations challenged the world to "do your damnedest" to make his country change. Those were dark days for South Africa's diplomatic corps. And into the fray walked a new director general of South Africa's Department of Foreign Affairs.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene in President Frederik W. de Klerk's anteroom this week was his government's dream come true: Heads of state and foreign ministers cooled their heels for half-hour meetings with South Africa's white leader. "I'm just flabbergasted by the whole thing," said Alayne Reesberg, a Foreign Ministry spokeswoman who watched the parade. "We couldn't even process all the requests to see him. If only he'd grow a twin. We could have used one."
NEWS
August 3, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The South African government, reacting positively for the first time to the mounting international criticism of the partial state of emergency here, agreed Friday to receive a delegation of three foreign ministers from the European Community to discuss the country's continuing civil unrest.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk confirmed long-held suspicions about South Africa's nuclear capability Wednesday, revealing that the white-minority government had built six nuclear bombs since the late 1970s but, three years ago, had destroyed them along with all their blueprints. "This country will never be able to build a nuclear device again," De Klerk said after making his announcement to a joint session of Parliament in Cape Town.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only four years ago, Pretoria was the target of world rage. A package of U.S. sanctions was biting down hard, African governments were demanding even greater isolation and the South African ambassador to the United Nations challenged the world to "do your damnedest" to make his country change. Those were dark days for South Africa's diplomatic corps. And into the fray walked a new director general of South Africa's Department of Foreign Affairs.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
African National Congress President Oliver R. Tambo, opening a historic nationwide ANC conference Friday, urged his black liberation movement to consider for the first time softening its stand on sanctions against South Africa. "It is no longer enough for us to repeat the tired slogans," said Tambo, 73, delivering the first speech since his return Thursday from 30 years in exile. "We should . . .
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene in President Frederik W. de Klerk's anteroom this week was his government's dream come true: Heads of state and foreign ministers cooled their heels for half-hour meetings with South Africa's white leader. "I'm just flabbergasted by the whole thing," said Alayne Reesberg, a Foreign Ministry spokeswoman who watched the parade. "We couldn't even process all the requests to see him. If only he'd grow a twin. We could have used one."
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government's decision to release Nelson R. Mandela was triggered by years of mounting worldwide pressure for apartheid reform and--more than anything else--by a growing realization among South Africa's 5 million whites that their privileged life under a minority government is doomed.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Acting President Frederik W. de Klerk of South Africa on Monday met President Kenneth D. Kaunda of Zambia, one of his harshest critics in black-ruled Africa, near the misty rainbows of Victoria Falls and outlined his "positive, hopeful vision" of ending apartheid.
NEWS
July 25, 1985 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan is preparing to review his controversial policy of "constructive engagement" toward South Africa and soon will receive from his advisers a number of proposals aimed at forcing changes in the white minority government's system of apartheid, a senior Administration official said Wednesday.
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