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NEWS
December 27, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The husky white diplomat sped into town from his South African jet, past the big road sign reading "Apartheid Is a Crime Against Humanity," and embraced a roomful of black dignitaries as "my African brothers." Afterward, at the presidential palace, he cracked open a case of South African wine and poured glassfuls of hints to his French-speaking hosts: How about putting this fine wine on the store shelves here? The polite, if chilled, response: The Congo has quite enough wine already, Mr.
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NEWS
June 14, 1994 | Associated Press
South African President Nelson Mandela asked for a renaissance to pull Africa from misery to prosperity, but he told African leaders Monday that a new era depends on better government. The massacres of Rwanda are a "stern and severe rebuke to all of us," Mandela declared at a meeting of the Organization of African Unity, its 30th summit and the first free of colonial rule and apartheid.
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NEWS
February 20, 1990 | From Reuters
President Frederik W. de Klerk has accepted an invitation to attend a meeting of African heads of state Saturday, apparently reaping a first reward from some of apartheid's staunchest foes for freeing Nelson R. Mandela. "It is confirmed that . . . De Klerk . . . will make a one-day visit to Zaire . . . to attend a meeting of a number of African heads of state," the president's spokesman said in a statement Monday.
NEWS
January 14, 1992
The "Frontline" of black-ruled countries, linked for so long by their proximity to--and disdain for--apartheid South Africa, meet Wednesday in the Zambian capital to elect a new chairman and also to ponder serious questions about their collective future. With apartheid and white-minority rule beginning to crumble in South Africa, the question these days is whether the Frontline still has a reason to exist. One by one, African countries are removing sanctions on Pretoria.
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eighteen African states closed a two-day economic summit in the kingdom of Swaziland, agreeing to maintain anti-apartheid sanctions against South Africa. The heads of state of the 18 southern and eastern African countries of the Preferential Trade Area also appealed for increased foreign aid to bolster economic development in the region.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Accusing South Africa of sponsoring "terrorism" and engaging in "blatant aggression" against its neighbors, Michael S. Dukakis said Monday that if elected President he "would not rule out" giving military aid to the "front-line" states bordering the white-ruled nation.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk was greeted by hundreds of singing children when he arrived for a meeting with President Felix Houphouet-Boigny in Yamoussoukro. South Africa and Ivory Coast do not have formal diplomatic relations, but they do have close trade ties. A front-page editorial in the government-controlled daily Fraternite Matin appeared to rule out closer diplomatic relations for now.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
On a recent misty evening here on the coast of Africa, four giant cranes were loading Zimbabwean asbestos into the deep hold of a ship bound for Europe. A 1940s steam engine carrying Zambian copper announced its arrival with a long, hoarse whistle. Beira's port, moribund only a year ago, was bustling. Out on the gentle water of the Indian Ocean, a mile or so from shore, two giant freighters quietly waited their turn.
NEWS
July 2, 1987
The Senate approved legislation to bar U.S. aid to countries in southern Africa that support the South African guerrilla practice of "necklacing," the killing of blacks suspected of cooperating with South African authorities by burning them alive in rubber tires. The measure--less restrictive than an earlier version approved by the Senate in May--goes to President Reagan, who has indicated that he will sign it.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | DON SHANNON, DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resisting South African military and economic aggression has cost nine neighbor states more than 1.5 million lives and $60 billion since 1980, a U.N. study released Friday found. The study said continued resistance will demand additional sacrifice and expense, and it urged world support for a campaign to bring down the white-minority led government of South Africa. So far, it said, the burden of the struggle has fallen largely on the former Portuguese colonies of Mozambique and Angola.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Executives from government-owned Kenya Airways emerged from a secret meeting in Johannesburg several months ago with a big prize--a ground-breaking agreement to resume reciprocal flights between Nairobi and Johannesburg by the flagship carriers of both countries, after a gap of 27 years. But on the way home the officials had to stop first in Gaborone, the capital of Botswana, to have their passports stamped with a Botswana visa.
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eighteen African states closed a two-day economic summit in the kingdom of Swaziland, agreeing to maintain anti-apartheid sanctions against South Africa. The heads of state of the 18 southern and eastern African countries of the Preferential Trade Area also appealed for increased foreign aid to bolster economic development in the region.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | From Reuters
President Frederik W. de Klerk has accepted an invitation to attend a meeting of African heads of state Saturday, apparently reaping a first reward from some of apartheid's staunchest foes for freeing Nelson R. Mandela. "It is confirmed that . . . De Klerk . . . will make a one-day visit to Zaire . . . to attend a meeting of a number of African heads of state," the president's spokesman said in a statement Monday.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk was greeted by hundreds of singing children when he arrived for a meeting with President Felix Houphouet-Boigny in Yamoussoukro. South Africa and Ivory Coast do not have formal diplomatic relations, but they do have close trade ties. A front-page editorial in the government-controlled daily Fraternite Matin appeared to rule out closer diplomatic relations for now.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | DON SHANNON, DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resisting South African military and economic aggression has cost nine neighbor states more than 1.5 million lives and $60 billion since 1980, a U.N. study released Friday found. The study said continued resistance will demand additional sacrifice and expense, and it urged world support for a campaign to bring down the white-minority led government of South Africa. So far, it said, the burden of the struggle has fallen largely on the former Portuguese colonies of Mozambique and Angola.
NEWS
December 27, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The husky white diplomat sped into town from his South African jet, past the big road sign reading "Apartheid Is a Crime Against Humanity," and embraced a roomful of black dignitaries as "my African brothers." Afterward, at the presidential palace, he cracked open a case of South African wine and poured glassfuls of hints to his French-speaking hosts: How about putting this fine wine on the store shelves here? The polite, if chilled, response: The Congo has quite enough wine already, Mr.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | Associated Press
South African President Nelson Mandela asked for a renaissance to pull Africa from misery to prosperity, but he told African leaders Monday that a new era depends on better government. The massacres of Rwanda are a "stern and severe rebuke to all of us," Mandela declared at a meeting of the Organization of African Unity, its 30th summit and the first free of colonial rule and apartheid.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Accusing South Africa of sponsoring "terrorism" and engaging in "blatant aggression" against its neighbors, Michael S. Dukakis said Monday that if elected President he "would not rule out" giving military aid to the "front-line" states bordering the white-ruled nation.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
On a recent misty evening here on the coast of Africa, four giant cranes were loading Zimbabwean asbestos into the deep hold of a ship bound for Europe. A 1940s steam engine carrying Zambian copper announced its arrival with a long, hoarse whistle. Beira's port, moribund only a year ago, was bustling. Out on the gentle water of the Indian Ocean, a mile or so from shore, two giant freighters quietly waited their turn.
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