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NEWS
March 22, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South African black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela, savoring the sort of treatment usually reserved for a head of state, summoned Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and Secretary of State James A. Baker III to a rented house Wednesday for back-to-back lectures on the evils of apartheid. With Baker at his side, Mandela told reporters that the secretary of state's planned meeting today in Cape Town with South African President Frederik W.
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NEWS
January 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African Foreign Minister Pik Botha met in Cape Town with U.S. and Soviet envoys to discuss a regional peace agreement centered on Namibia. Namibia became independent last year as part of an agreement brokered by the United States for the withdrawal of 50,000 Cuban troops from Angola, Namibia's northern neighbor. Herman Cohen, U.S. assistant secretary of state for African affairs, told reporters he was confident Cuban withdrawal from Namibia would be completed on schedule in June.
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NEWS
March 7, 1988
South Africa proposed a direct deal with the Soviet Union to resolve Angola's civil war and set up a neutral government there. South African Defense Minister Magnus Malan, referring to the anticipated Soviet troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, said that if Moscow clearly states that it is not interested in a pro-Soviet government in Angola, Pretoria will say that it will not try to establish a pro-South African regime there.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South African black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela, savoring the sort of treatment usually reserved for a head of state, summoned Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and Secretary of State James A. Baker III to a rented house Wednesday for back-to-back lectures on the evils of apartheid. With Baker at his side, Mandela told reporters that the secretary of state's planned meeting today in Cape Town with South African President Frederik W.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | Associated Press
South Africa will remain in the International Atomic Energy Agency, U.S. Energy Secretary John S. Herrington said Tuesday, after U.S.-Soviet talks on Pretoria's willingness to sign a nuclear non-proliferation pact. "We had a meeting with the Soviets this morning, and we reached common ground on the South African issue," Herrington told reporters.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African Foreign Minister Pik Botha met in Cape Town with U.S. and Soviet envoys to discuss a regional peace agreement centered on Namibia. Namibia became independent last year as part of an agreement brokered by the United States for the withdrawal of 50,000 Cuban troops from Angola, Namibia's northern neighbor. Herman Cohen, U.S. assistant secretary of state for African affairs, told reporters he was confident Cuban withdrawal from Namibia would be completed on schedule in June.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The African National Congress, which for more than 25 years has waged a low- level campaign of guerrilla attacks to press for an end to apartheid in South Africa, is coming under increasing pressure from an unexpected quarter, the Soviet Union, to reach a political settlement.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
World leaders welcomed South Africa's announcement Saturday of Nelson R. Mandela's impending release from prison, and international rejoicing began to build for an event so long awaited by so many. Britain said it is time to resume contacts with internationally isolated South Africa, but anti-apartheid campaigners warned against any reduction of pressure on the white-led government. President Bush praised South African President Frederik W.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
World leaders welcomed South Africa's announcement Saturday of Nelson R. Mandela's impending release from prison, and international rejoicing began to build for an event so long awaited by so many. Britain said it is time to resume contacts with internationally isolated South Africa, but anti-apartheid campaigners warned against any reduction of pressure on the white-led government. President Bush praised South African President Frederik W.
NEWS
March 7, 1988
South Africa proposed a direct deal with the Soviet Union to resolve Angola's civil war and set up a neutral government there. South African Defense Minister Magnus Malan, referring to the anticipated Soviet troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, said that if Moscow clearly states that it is not interested in a pro-Soviet government in Angola, Pretoria will say that it will not try to establish a pro-South African regime there.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The African National Congress, which for more than 25 years has waged a low- level campaign of guerrilla attacks to press for an end to apartheid in South Africa, is coming under increasing pressure from an unexpected quarter, the Soviet Union, to reach a political settlement.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | Associated Press
South Africa will remain in the International Atomic Energy Agency, U.S. Energy Secretary John S. Herrington said Tuesday, after U.S.-Soviet talks on Pretoria's willingness to sign a nuclear non-proliferation pact. "We had a meeting with the Soviets this morning, and we reached common ground on the South African issue," Herrington told reporters.
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