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NEWS
April 26, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
South African commandos killed five suspected African National Congress guerrillas in two skirmishes during a predawn raid Saturday on the Zambian border town of Livingstone, army headquarters said here. But Zambia and the ANC said all of the dead were Zambian civilians. The army's statement said that the commandos were engaged in "an armed reconnaissance . . .
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NEWS
February 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
African National Congress leader Nelson R. Mandela met Tuesday with chiefs from his tribe and with a Swedish diplomat, and plans were made for him to travel to Zimbabwe and Zambia next week. The National Reception Committee, which has coordinated Mandela's schedule since he was released Feb. 11 after 27 years in prison, said he will go to Harare, Zimbabwe, on Monday. On Tuesday, he will go to Lusaka, Zambia, where he will meet with exiled ANC leaders.
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NEWS
August 29, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Acting President Frederik W. de Klerk of South Africa on Monday met President Kenneth D. Kaunda of Zambia, one of his harshest critics in black-ruled Africa, near the misty rainbows of Victoria Falls and outlined his "positive, hopeful vision" of ending apartheid.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
World leaders welcomed South Africa's announcement Saturday of Nelson R. Mandela's impending release from prison, and international rejoicing began to build for an event so long awaited by so many. Britain said it is time to resume contacts with internationally isolated South Africa, but anti-apartheid campaigners warned against any reduction of pressure on the white-led government. President Bush praised South African President Frederik W.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
An embittered President Pieter W. Botha, in an unprecedented public fight with his own party leaders, announced his resignation on nationwide television Monday night, ending a tumultuous 11 years of autocratic, combative but reform-minded rule. The 73-year-old president complained that his authority was being defied by his Cabinet, especially by Education Minister Frederik W.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
World leaders welcomed South Africa's announcement Saturday of Nelson R. Mandela's impending release from prison, and international rejoicing began to build for an event so long awaited by so many. Britain said it is time to resume contacts with internationally isolated South Africa, but anti-apartheid campaigners warned against any reduction of pressure on the white-led government. President Bush praised South African President Frederik W.
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | From The Washington Post
President Pieter W. Botha threw South Africa's governing National Party into disarray Friday by announcing that party leader Frederik W. de Klerk, the heir apparent to the presidency, does not have his permission to meet later this month with Zambian President Kenneth D. Kaunda. In a terse statement issued from his Cape Town office, Botha said he had no knowledge of the planned trip to Livingstone, Zambia, by De Klerk and Foreign Minister Roelof F.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
African National Congress leader Nelson R. Mandela met Tuesday with chiefs from his tribe and with a Swedish diplomat, and plans were made for him to travel to Zimbabwe and Zambia next week. The National Reception Committee, which has coordinated Mandela's schedule since he was released Feb. 11 after 27 years in prison, said he will go to Harare, Zimbabwe, on Monday. On Tuesday, he will go to Lusaka, Zambia, where he will meet with exiled ANC leaders.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Acting President Frederik W. de Klerk of South Africa on Monday met President Kenneth D. Kaunda of Zambia, one of his harshest critics in black-ruled Africa, near the misty rainbows of Victoria Falls and outlined his "positive, hopeful vision" of ending apartheid.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
An embittered President Pieter W. Botha, in an unprecedented public fight with his own party leaders, announced his resignation on nationwide television Monday night, ending a tumultuous 11 years of autocratic, combative but reform-minded rule. The 73-year-old president complained that his authority was being defied by his Cabinet, especially by Education Minister Frederik W.
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | From The Washington Post
President Pieter W. Botha threw South Africa's governing National Party into disarray Friday by announcing that party leader Frederik W. de Klerk, the heir apparent to the presidency, does not have his permission to meet later this month with Zambian President Kenneth D. Kaunda. In a terse statement issued from his Cape Town office, Botha said he had no knowledge of the planned trip to Livingstone, Zambia, by De Klerk and Foreign Minister Roelof F.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
South African commandos killed five suspected African National Congress guerrillas in two skirmishes during a predawn raid Saturday on the Zambian border town of Livingstone, army headquarters said here. But Zambia and the ANC said all of the dead were Zambian civilians. The army's statement said that the commandos were engaged in "an armed reconnaissance . . .
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