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South Africa Government

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NEWS
February 2, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The South African government proposed land reforms to remedy inequities between blacks and whites--and admitted it might decide to seize some land from whites. Most of the reforms would be accomplished through a grant program that would give blacks money to buy land from whites, who own 87% of South Africa's property but make up only 12% of the population, Land Affairs Minister Derek Hanekom said. Expropriation would be only a "measure of last resort," Hanekom added. Between 1960 and 1980, 3.
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WORLD
September 28, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Two retired icons and Nobel Peace Prize laureates, the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu, are being kept waiting as the South African government weighs a decision on granting a visa for the Tibetan spiritual leader. Tutu, the retired Anglican archbishop for Cape Town, invited the Dalai Lama to attend his 80th birthday celebration next week and to deliver the Desmond Tutu International Peace Lecture on Oct. 8. But the African National Congress government, wary of irritating the country's largest trading partner, China, has refused to indicate whether it will grant the visa.
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NEWS
July 8, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historic convention of the African National Congress, which ended early Sunday, removed any doubt that supporters of the onetime guerrilla movement are committed to negotiations--but are also deeply suspicious of the white-controlled government. The result of that militant pragmatism is likely to be renewed clashes with the government over ANC protest marches and resistance campaigns, such as the occupation of empty white schools by pupils in severely overcrowded black schools.
NEWS
March 26, 2002 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government on Monday lost a court appeal that could have allowed it to continue restricting access to a key drug for thousands of pregnant women who are HIV-positive. Reaffirming an earlier ruling, a Pretoria high court ordered the government to provide the anti-AIDS drug nevirapine to all public hospitals with the capacity to use it, even as the government awaits a hearing before the country's Constitutional Court in May.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government said Thursday that the security concerns holding up the release of jailed nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela include threats against his life from both radical left-wing blacks and right-wing whites. "We want him to get out of that prison and walk the streets of our country as a free man . . . and alive," said Adriaan Vlok, the government minister of law and order.
NEWS
April 1, 1988
The South Africa government banned all outdoor meetings for a year, except those involving sporting events or funerals. Justice Minister Kobie Coetsee announced the order, to take effect today, under terms of the Internal Security Act, which prohibits a range of activities. Under national emergency regulations already in effect, outdoor rallies are illegal unless approved by a magistrate or Law and Order Minister Adriaan Vlok.
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like any good poet, Sithembile Mlanjeni says his inspiration comes from deep inside, surging up to fill his brain and voice with the rolling rhythm and kinetic cadence of Xhosa verse. Unlike most bards, however, Mlanjeni performs barefoot and bare-chested. He waves a cow-tail whisk in one hand and a burl-topped club called a knobkerrie in the other. He wears a jackal skin cap, an intricate bead necklace and a gleaming smile.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The word went down hard in South Africa's largest black township, where symbols of liberation are still rare and revered. "It's a blow to us, I'll tell you," Rebecca Mofutsane, a Soweto office worker, said Friday. "We had admired her, called her 'mother of the nation.' Now the 'mother' is killing the people of the nation? It is terrible."
BUSINESS
March 6, 2001 | Reuters
The global drug industry took South Africa's government to court in a landmark challenge condemned by several thousand AIDS activists parading through Pretoria with posters saying "Lives before profits." The hearing at the Pretoria High Court is seen as a test of the ability of the richest drug firms to protect billion-dollar patent rights against a government looking for an affordable way to fight the AIDS epidemic sweeping the African continent.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Protests against South Africa's white government continued, but President F. W. de Klerk and ANC leader Nelson Mandela indicated that black-white negotiations could resume soon. The scattered demonstrations were much smaller than three previous days of strikes and mass rallies called by the African National Congress and its allies to try to hasten the end of white minority rule.
NEWS
May 29, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Constitutional Court here ruled Monday that the South African government acted unconstitutionally in sending a suspected American Embassy bomber to the United States to face the death penalty and should have instead sought to protect him from this punishment. The hand-over to the FBI of Tanzanian citizen Khalfan Khamis Mohamed was rife with irregularities, Constitutional Court President Arthur Chaskalson said.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allegations that three senior members of the ruling party were plotting to oust or harm South African President Thabo Mbeki were dismissed Thursday as "paranoia" and "crazy rubbish" by government opponents, analysts and prominent political figures. The accusations made this week by Safety and Security Minister Steve Tshwete, who has launched an investigation into the alleged conspiracy, were aimed at businessmen Cyril Ramaphosa, Tokyo Sexwale and Mathews Phosa.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
Pharmaceutical giants entered settlement talks with the government Wednesday, signaling that they are dropping their fight against a law that could provide cheaper versions of AIDS drugs to millions of South Africans. The firms' lawsuit, postponed until today as the discussions continued, has deeply embarrassed the drug companies since hearings began six weeks ago. Many of them have responded by drastically cutting prices on their own.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angry white farmers in South Africa held a protest Friday in support of a colleague facing the first forced expropriation of land that had been confiscated from blacks during the apartheid era. Several hundred farmers from the right-wing Transvaal Agricultural Union rallied in a conference hall in Lydenburg, about 175 miles northeast of Johannesburg, to show their opposition to what they called "blatant discrimination and racism" against whites.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | From the Washington Post
President Thabo Mbeki rejected appeals to declare South Africa's AIDS epidemic a national emergency, a step that would enable the government to override patents owned by foreign pharmaceutical firms and buy or manufacture cheap, generic versions of life-prolonging anti-AIDS medicines.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | From Reuters
Conservative farmers have vowed protests after the government issued its first expropriation order Tuesday against a white farmer reluctant to give his land back to the original black owners. Willem Pretorius received the order Tuesday requiring him to sell his farm, near the ultra-conservative town of Lydenburg in Mpumalanga province, to the government to return it to a community evicted under apartheid in the early 1960s.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2001 | Reuters
The global drug industry took South Africa's government to court in a landmark challenge condemned by several thousand AIDS activists parading through Pretoria with posters saying "Lives before profits." The hearing at the Pretoria High Court is seen as a test of the ability of the richest drug firms to protect billion-dollar patent rights against a government looking for an affordable way to fight the AIDS epidemic sweeping the African continent.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | From Reuters
About 2,000 people crowded central Cape Town on Sunday to celebrate the return of land taken from them at the height of South Africa's racist apartheid system. Bands played and choirs sang as President Thabo Mbeki gave final approval to the transfer of land to the families of those evicted in the 1960s and '70s from the central city area known as District Six.
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