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South Africa Government Agencies

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NEWS
October 19, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission is seeking an extension to a deadline to allow more people to apply for amnesty for apartheid crimes. President Nelson Mandela opposed the move, saying it would signal leniency. Under the legislation that created the commission, people who confess to politically motivated crimes committed up to Dec. 6, 1993, are eligible for amnesty.
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NEWS
September 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission, set up to review and heal the abuses of the apartheid past, said it may hold a unique session abroad to listen to a man who has accused President Nelson Mandela's ex-wife, Nomzamo Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, of murder. Katiza Cebekhulu, her former bodyguard, alleges that he saw her kill activist Stompie Seipei, 14, in 1988. Cebekhulu fled South Africa after the killing and is in London.
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NEWS
September 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission, set up to review and heal the abuses of the apartheid past, said it may hold a unique session abroad to listen to a man who has accused President Nelson Mandela's ex-wife, Nomzamo Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, of murder. Katiza Cebekhulu, her former bodyguard, alleges that he saw her kill activist Stompie Seipei, 14, in 1988. Cebekhulu fled South Africa after the killing and is in London.
NEWS
October 19, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission is seeking an extension to a deadline to allow more people to apply for amnesty for apartheid crimes. President Nelson Mandela opposed the move, saying it would signal leniency. Under the legislation that created the commission, people who confess to politically motivated crimes committed up to Dec. 6, 1993, are eligible for amnesty.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk moved to rein in his national security forces Tuesday by replacing the powerful and secretive National Security Management System with a smaller organization that will be more directly under Cabinet control. The move marked a significant break with the era of former President Pieter W.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A committee of Parliament ordered an investigation into the funding of a secret South African military unit accused of political killings. It directed the auditor-general to examine books and vouchers of the Defense Ministry's secret $2.2-billion Special Defense Account. The move could bring new disclosures about the shadowy Civil Cooperation Bureau, already under investigation by a judge.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A military high command with ties to the office of South African Defense Minister Magnus Malan directed the activities of a secret military unit that has been linked to death squads, a leading South African daily reported. The Star named Defense Force chief Jannie Geldenhuys as No. 2 in the chain of command of the so-called Civil Cooperation Bureau. The CCB was linked last week to several murders, bombings and arson attacks.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whoever stuffed the ballot boxes in the Zulu strongholds of northern Natal last week did a good job--too good perhaps. "There were sealed ballot boxes in which there were 3,000-odd votes, and all the ballots were neatly stacked up inside," explained John Wills, a lawyer and election observer in Empangeni. "It's physically impossible if people are voting one by one."
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Responding to harsh criticism, Defense Minister Magnus Malan told South Africa's Parliament on Monday that he has suspended all operations of a secret military unit accused of involvement in the killings of anti-apartheid activists. Malan also revealed that Anton Lubowski, a prominent anti-apartheid politician in Namibia who was killed last year, was a paid intelligence agent for the South African Defense Force.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whoever stuffed the ballot boxes in the Zulu strongholds of northern Natal last week did a good job--too good perhaps. "There were sealed ballot boxes in which there were 3,000-odd votes, and all the ballots were neatly stacked up inside," explained John Wills, a lawyer and election observer in Empangeni. "It's physically impossible if people are voting one by one."
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A committee of Parliament ordered an investigation into the funding of a secret South African military unit accused of political killings. It directed the auditor-general to examine books and vouchers of the Defense Ministry's secret $2.2-billion Special Defense Account. The move could bring new disclosures about the shadowy Civil Cooperation Bureau, already under investigation by a judge.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Responding to harsh criticism, Defense Minister Magnus Malan told South Africa's Parliament on Monday that he has suspended all operations of a secret military unit accused of involvement in the killings of anti-apartheid activists. Malan also revealed that Anton Lubowski, a prominent anti-apartheid politician in Namibia who was killed last year, was a paid intelligence agent for the South African Defense Force.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A military high command with ties to the office of South African Defense Minister Magnus Malan directed the activities of a secret military unit that has been linked to death squads, a leading South African daily reported. The Star named Defense Force chief Jannie Geldenhuys as No. 2 in the chain of command of the so-called Civil Cooperation Bureau. The CCB was linked last week to several murders, bombings and arson attacks.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk moved to rein in his national security forces Tuesday by replacing the powerful and secretive National Security Management System with a smaller organization that will be more directly under Cabinet control. The move marked a significant break with the era of former President Pieter W.
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