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South Africa Government Officials

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NEWS
January 31, 1987 | From the Washington Post
South African Ambassador to Britain Denis Worrall resigned Friday, saying he wants to return to his country and "re-enter national public life." Although Worrall did not specify his plans, informed speculation here said he intends to leave South Africa's ruling National Party and run as an independent candidate for Parliament in the whites-only election scheduled for May 6.
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NEWS
September 9, 2001
Thousands of mourners, including Nelson Mandela and South African President Thabo Mbeki gathered today for the funeral of Mbeki's father, a famous anti-apartheid activist. In accordance with his wishes, Govan Mbeki was buried in a simple cemetery, among the ordinary people he served. He died Thursday after a long illness at the age of 91. A teacher, author and political leader in his own right, Mbeki spent 23 years in prison with Mandela under apartheid.
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NEWS
January 4, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The orange and white South African Airways jetliner, door open and engines idling at Jan Smuts International Airport, was chockablock full, except for one front-row seat, when the loudspeaker crackled to life. The captain announced a half-hour delay in departing for Cape Town. Passengers grimaced and looked at their watches. Thirty minutes passed and the captain was back at the mike, announcing another half-hour delay. By now, most of the 260 passengers were in a thoroughly bad mood.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allegations that three senior members of the ruling party were plotting to oust or harm South African President Thabo Mbeki were dismissed Thursday as "paranoia" and "crazy rubbish" by government opponents, analysts and prominent political figures. The accusations made this week by Safety and Security Minister Steve Tshwete, who has launched an investigation into the alleged conspiracy, were aimed at businessmen Cyril Ramaphosa, Tokyo Sexwale and Mathews Phosa.
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the corner of York and Courtenay streets at the center of this erstwhile timber town, museum guard Ben Rasi stands watch over a hand-carved ivory AK-47 rifle, hunting trophies of buffalo, wildebeest and kudu and a dazzling array of gold, silk and other collectibles from around the world. The P. W. Botha Collection, housed in a two-story annex to the George Museum, is the former South African president's grandiose tribute to himself.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A six-month-long judicial inquiry, investigating allegations that government death squads assassinated 71 political opponents, exonerated the police Tuesday but blamed a covert army unit for two murders. Justice Louis Harms, who led the government-appointed commission, recommended that the authorities consider charges against army operatives for the two 1986 murders in Pretoria's Mamelodi township, a 1989 bombing near Cape Town and plots to kill three political activists.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
President Pieter W. Botha's surprise "courtesy visit" with jailed nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela drew widely divergent reaction Sunday, with anti-apartheid leaders calling it a "cheap government scheme" to raise false hopes for Mandela's release and others applauding it as a first step toward a peaceful settlement of South Africa's problems.
NEWS
March 14, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The key prosecution witness in the murder trial of former Defense Minister Magnus Malan and 19 others provided a chilling inside look Wednesday at the deadly web of covert operations used by the former apartheid regime to kill black dissidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles police said Friday they will seek charges against a South African consul who allegedly fought with his wife, then claimed diplomatic immunity when questioned by officers. Detectives expect to present a case to the district attorney's office Monday to determine whether to charge Mpendulo Kumalo, a member of Los Angeles' large but little-known diplomatic community, with felony spousal assault, police said.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk, launching an unprecedented campaign to woo nonwhite voters to his party, was driven off a podium in this township Saturday by protesters who hurled gravel at him and yanked the plug on his sound system. "We will not be silenced by these threats," De Klerk vowed to cheers before his speech was cut short by the hecklers. "We bring a message of hope, of prosperity, of a place in the sun for all South Africans."
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
South African President Thabo Mbeki questioned the need for HIV tests, reigniting a debate about acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Mbeki caused an international uproar more than a year ago when he courted the view of some scientists who question the link between the human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS and believe that HIV testing should be stopped. After his public image took a battering, Mbeki withdrew from the debate.
NEWS
May 14, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Thabo Mbeki prepares for his first trip to the United States as South Africa's president, this troubled continent is proving to be a formidable distraction for him. A state visit to the United States is a big deal for any foreign leader, but for Mbeki--just 11 months into his presidency--the six-day sojourn scheduled to begin next weekend is his chance to talk global with everyone from Texas Gov. George W. Bush to San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely 24 hours on the job, President Thabo Mbeki announced changes Thursday in the Cabinet he inherited from former President Nelson Mandela. There were few new faces, however, and he left important economic posts untouched in a reassuring signal to foreign investors.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The subject was Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. There were suggestions he might seek asylum in South Africa. Would he be prevented from entering the country? "No, we will not ban anybody," President Nelson Mandela told reporters here last month. "What we condemn are his actions." Mandela's statement sent journalists scurrying. "Milosevic Is Welcome in South Africa," screamed the headlines. Later, Mandela complained that the media had "gravely distorted" his remarks.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ruling African National Congress has scored a resounding victory in this country's second multiracial elections, winning almost 66% of the national vote and at least seven of the nine provincial legislatures, according to incomplete returns today. Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, who is certain to succeed retiring President Nelson Mandela on June 16, greeted the news with reserve and excitement during a celebration at a conference center north of here. "The people have spoken!"
NEWS
June 2, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stinging setback for the truth panel that has delved into this country's apartheid past, a court on Tuesday overturned former President Pieter W. Botha's conviction on charges of refusing to testify about the secrets of his white-minority regime. Botha, 83, who led South Africa from 1978 to 1989, declared his gratitude for the ruling "on behalf of all South Africans who love their country."
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The head of South Africa's Independent Election Commission quit, citing "differences" with President Nelson Mandela's ruling African National Congress over the role of the commission. Johann Kriegler, a justice with the Constitution Court, said his departure will not derail the country's second all-race poll, expected in May. Mandela appointed the deputy head of the commission, Brigalia Bam, as a stand-in.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
South African President Thabo Mbeki questioned the need for HIV tests, reigniting a debate about acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Mbeki caused an international uproar more than a year ago when he courted the view of some scientists who question the link between the human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS and believe that HIV testing should be stopped. After his public image took a battering, Mbeki withdrew from the debate.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After settling into the unfamiliar role of running the country, the African National Congress issued a candid self-assessment of how things were going. The Rev. Makhenkesi Stofile, the ANC chief whip in Parliament and later a provincial premier, acknowledged what a jolt coming into power had been for the former underground movement. Not only were most members of Parliament unable to find their way around government offices, he said, but they also didn't know how to act toward their staff.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The head of South Africa's Independent Election Commission quit, citing "differences" with President Nelson Mandela's ruling African National Congress over the role of the commission. Johann Kriegler, a justice with the Constitution Court, said his departure will not derail the country's second all-race poll, expected in May. Mandela appointed the deputy head of the commission, Brigalia Bam, as a stand-in.
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