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South Africa Health

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NEWS
December 1, 2000 | From Reuters
The regulatory Medicines Control Council of South Africa, a nation where one in 10 people is HIV-positive, granted a special exemption Thursday to allow importation of a generic anti-AIDS drug. AIDS activists hailed the action as a landmark decision. The council's decision to allow the conditional use of Biozole, a generic version of the anti-AIDS drug fluconazole, came after an application from the AIDS Law Project, a South African rights group.
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WORLD
September 19, 2006 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
The United Nations special envoy for AIDS has likened her to the "lunatic fringe," while a well-known comedian derides her as the "angel of death." She is South Africa's top health official and one of the most important front-line fighters against AIDS in a country beset by an epidemic.
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BUSINESS
June 20, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
DaimlerChrysler this week launched a program to tackle AIDS at its operations in South Africa and criticized the government's approach to an epidemic that it said is hampering foreign investment. DaimlerChrysler, together with Germany, will spend $746,000 establishing a program to combat AIDS among its 4,400-strong work force in South Africa and their families, a total of some 23,000 people, Christoph Kopke, the chief executive of the car maker's South African unit, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
DaimlerChrysler this week launched a program to tackle AIDS at its operations in South Africa and criticized the government's approach to an epidemic that it said is hampering foreign investment. DaimlerChrysler, together with Germany, will spend $746,000 establishing a program to combat AIDS among its 4,400-strong work force in South Africa and their families, a total of some 23,000 people, Christoph Kopke, the chief executive of the car maker's South African unit, said in an interview.
NEWS
July 22, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Glenda Gray, a pediatrician at the sprawling Baragwanath Hospital complex, remembers how she and other researchers once had to search for patients infected with the AIDS virus. "That was only five years ago," she said. "Now we see them every day. . . . AIDS is here. And it's spreading like wildfire." South Africa was the last country to resist the acquired immune deficiency syndrome pandemic that began ravaging much of sub-Saharan Africa in the 1980s. No longer.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The controversial idea that a contaminated polio vaccine was responsible for the spread of AIDS in Africa has been discredited by new research released today. Analysis of stored vaccine samples by four independent research groups shows conclusively that they were not contaminated with the AIDS virus, thereby refuting the widely disseminated theory proposed by British author Edward Hooper in his 1999 book, "The River."
NEWS
November 17, 1996
Re "Juans and All, Procession Retraces De Anza's Trek," Nov. 12. My question to you is: How did all these Juans cross the border with their horses and all amid all the immigrant bashing that has been occurring? On top of that, I didn't know that Colonial uniforms were riding beside De Anza. While acknowledging De Anza's trail is of historical significance, as well as other of California's explorers, I must say, "get real!"--and try more realistic approaches next year.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two startling reports on AIDS show the disease is spreading so rapidly in South Africa that it threatens to cripple the economy and devastate families for decades, perpetuating the ills of apartheid. Released to coincide with World AIDS Day today, the reports say that while the AIDS epidemic was slow in coming to South Africa and its neighbors compared with other parts of the continent, it now has arrived with a vengeance. The region has become the hardest hit in the world.
NEWS
February 19, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of growing worries about the economic toll of AIDS, South Africa's telephone company said Friday it will buy 5 million condoms to distribute to its employees. The purchase by Telkom, which has about 58,000 workers, reflects a sobering realization in big business that the cash-strapped South African government is struggling in its battle against AIDS.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government health officials, declaring an end to decades of hospital apartheid, announced Wednesday that South Africa has decided to open the more than 240 public hospitals in the country to all races. The move, welcomed by activists as an important step toward dismantling one of the pillars of apartheid, is a sweeping attempt to deal with severe overcrowding in black hospitals and patient shortages in white hospitals.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The controversial idea that a contaminated polio vaccine was responsible for the spread of AIDS in Africa has been discredited by new research released today. Analysis of stored vaccine samples by four independent research groups shows conclusively that they were not contaminated with the AIDS virus, thereby refuting the widely disseminated theory proposed by British author Edward Hooper in his 1999 book, "The River."
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | From Reuters
The regulatory Medicines Control Council of South Africa, a nation where one in 10 people is HIV-positive, granted a special exemption Thursday to allow importation of a generic anti-AIDS drug. AIDS activists hailed the action as a landmark decision. The council's decision to allow the conditional use of Biozole, a generic version of the anti-AIDS drug fluconazole, came after an application from the AIDS Law Project, a South African rights group.
NEWS
July 10, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
For the first time since the world's scientific community began international meetings to examine the AIDS epidemic some 17 years ago, the group is convening in a country, South Africa, ravaged by this modern day plague. Recent meetings have been held in cities such as Yokohama, Vancouver and Geneva, in industrialized countries where the AIDS problem is real but largely hidden in inner-city ghettos.
NEWS
February 19, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of growing worries about the economic toll of AIDS, South Africa's telephone company said Friday it will buy 5 million condoms to distribute to its employees. The purchase by Telkom, which has about 58,000 workers, reflects a sobering realization in big business that the cash-strapped South African government is struggling in its battle against AIDS.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two startling reports on AIDS show the disease is spreading so rapidly in South Africa that it threatens to cripple the economy and devastate families for decades, perpetuating the ills of apartheid. Released to coincide with World AIDS Day today, the reports say that while the AIDS epidemic was slow in coming to South Africa and its neighbors compared with other parts of the continent, it now has arrived with a vengeance. The region has become the hardest hit in the world.
NEWS
November 26, 1996 | Associated Press
The first victim of the deadly Ebola virus in South Africa has died. Regional health authorities said Marilyn Lahana, 46, a nurse who contracted the disease after treating a doctor from Gabon, died late Sunday. The doctor, Clement Mambana, had been hospitalized with an unidentified fever in October. When he recovered and was discharged Nov. 11, the Ebola was undiagnosed. But blood samples later revealed his fever had been brought on by the virus.
NEWS
July 10, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
For the first time since the world's scientific community began international meetings to examine the AIDS epidemic some 17 years ago, the group is convening in a country, South Africa, ravaged by this modern day plague. Recent meetings have been held in cities such as Yokohama, Vancouver and Geneva, in industrialized countries where the AIDS problem is real but largely hidden in inner-city ghettos.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a tiny square room deep in this township, Lucia Mofammere gave a throaty chant and called upon the wisdom of her ancestors. She pierced her patient's skin with a razor blade and pressed a secret black powder into the wound with a porcupine stiletto. But, this time, in a new twist on her ancient profession, Mofammere also was relying upon the collective wisdom of Magic Johnson, modern doctors and American AIDS educators.
NEWS
November 17, 1996
Re "Juans and All, Procession Retraces De Anza's Trek," Nov. 12. My question to you is: How did all these Juans cross the border with their horses and all amid all the immigrant bashing that has been occurring? On top of that, I didn't know that Colonial uniforms were riding beside De Anza. While acknowledging De Anza's trail is of historical significance, as well as other of California's explorers, I must say, "get real!"--and try more realistic approaches next year.
NEWS
July 22, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Glenda Gray, a pediatrician at the sprawling Baragwanath Hospital complex, remembers how she and other researchers once had to search for patients infected with the AIDS virus. "That was only five years ago," she said. "Now we see them every day. . . . AIDS is here. And it's spreading like wildfire." South Africa was the last country to resist the acquired immune deficiency syndrome pandemic that began ravaging much of sub-Saharan Africa in the 1980s. No longer.
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