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NEWS
November 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Winston Churchill emerged unscathed from a Boer War battle in South Africa a century ago, but his granddaughter was slightly injured while commemorating the bloody clash 190 miles southeast of Johannesburg. Celia Sandys, whose grandfather was present at the Jan. 24-25, 1900, battle of Spioenkop, fired a miniature cannon to mark the start of a road race being held in his name. The cannon backfired, peppering Sandys' face with grains of black powder, the South African Press Assn. reported.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Playwright John Kani sets his South African drama "Nothing but the Truth" in the year 2000, a decade after the repeal of apartheid and four years into a process of assessing human rights abuses committed during the bloodiest years of the nation's racially discriminatory laws. This investigation is overseen by the new government's Truth and Reconciliation Commission -- a name that, fortuitously, encodes the themes in Kani's play, being given its West Coast premiere at the Mark Taper Forum.
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NEWS
January 18, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As military strongholds go, Ft. Klapperkop has little to boast about. It is small and poorly situated and, since its opening 100 years ago today, has been of dubious strategic value. But as powerful symbols go, the brick and brownstone garrison has few rivals in this erstwhile capital of the Transvaal Republic, one of the ill-fated independent states founded in the 1800s by white Afrikaner farmers. Ft.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Tutu and Franklin: A Journey Towards Peace," a new two-hour documentary premiering tonight on KCET-TV, chronicles the historic first encounter between South Africa's Nobel Peace Prize winner, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and U.S. historian and Presidential Medal of Freedom winner Dr. John Hope Franklin. For a week in December 1998, they met on Goree Island, the infamous former slave port off the coast of Senegal, to discuss their nations' struggle for racial equality.
NEWS
June 19, 1991 | Associated Press
1949--Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act passed. 1950--Population Registration Act passed. Immorality Act tightened to ban interracial sex.Group Areas Act (residential segregation) passed. 1951--Mixed-race Coloreds removed from the voting roll. 1952--U.N. condemns apartheid. 1953--Reservation of Separate Amenities Act (which segregated public facilities, from toilets to libraries to swimming pools) passed. 1985--Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act repealed.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | From Reuters
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, who Wednesday came close to apologizing for British concentration camps during the Boer War, used the occasion to stress her nation's strong links with South Africa. "No one who reads of the distressing conditions in the detention camps which held both white and black detainees could fail to be moved even today, 100 years later," she told a banquet at the end of the first day of her second state visit.
NEWS
February 11, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing at her blackboard, Irene Nkwanyana has no textbooks for her fifth-grade history class at the Nkholi Primary School. She is making history instead. "In the past, I had to teach what the government wanted or I would be arrested," said Nkwanyana, who has taught black children for 30 years. "I had to teach that the black man was inferior." No longer. This year, for the first time, she has discarded textbooks that portray whites as civilized and blacks as primitive.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Tutu and Franklin: A Journey Towards Peace," a new two-hour documentary premiering tonight on KCET-TV, chronicles the historic first encounter between South Africa's Nobel Peace Prize winner, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and U.S. historian and Presidential Medal of Freedom winner Dr. John Hope Franklin. For a week in December 1998, they met on Goree Island, the infamous former slave port off the coast of Senegal, to discuss their nations' struggle for racial equality.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Two faces of South Africa. One is "South Africa Now," a low-budget, low-key--but in its own way absolutely spectacular--weekly newsmagazine that is indispensable viewing for anyone who wants to know what's really happening in southern Africa. Aired on PBS outlets in 62 cities, it's available locally at 9 a.m. Sundays on KCET Channel 28.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When red-robed Judge Quartus de Wet, sitting in Courtroom C of the Palace of Justice here, considered the case against Nelson R. Mandela in 1964, it was not a question of guilt or innocence that he pondered. It was whether to send Mandela and seven co-defendants to Death Row or give them life sentences. A ninth man, Lionel Bernstein, was acquitted but arrested after the trial and banned. "The atmosphere was very grim," remembers George Bizos, a Johannesburg lawyer who was on the defense team.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Winston Churchill emerged unscathed from a Boer War battle in South Africa a century ago, but his granddaughter was slightly injured while commemorating the bloody clash 190 miles southeast of Johannesburg. Celia Sandys, whose grandfather was present at the Jan. 24-25, 1900, battle of Spioenkop, fired a miniature cannon to mark the start of a road race being held in his name. The cannon backfired, peppering Sandys' face with grains of black powder, the South African Press Assn. reported.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | From Reuters
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, who Wednesday came close to apologizing for British concentration camps during the Boer War, used the occasion to stress her nation's strong links with South Africa. "No one who reads of the distressing conditions in the detention camps which held both white and black detainees could fail to be moved even today, 100 years later," she told a banquet at the end of the first day of her second state visit.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As military strongholds go, Ft. Klapperkop has little to boast about. It is small and poorly situated and, since its opening 100 years ago today, has been of dubious strategic value. But as powerful symbols go, the brick and brownstone garrison has few rivals in this erstwhile capital of the Transvaal Republic, one of the ill-fated independent states founded in the 1800s by white Afrikaner farmers. Ft.
NEWS
February 11, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing at her blackboard, Irene Nkwanyana has no textbooks for her fifth-grade history class at the Nkholi Primary School. She is making history instead. "In the past, I had to teach what the government wanted or I would be arrested," said Nkwanyana, who has taught black children for 30 years. "I had to teach that the black man was inferior." No longer. This year, for the first time, she has discarded textbooks that portray whites as civilized and blacks as primitive.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than five years ago, as a newly arrived correspondent, I learned an important lesson from the courageous people of this little township. And now, as I leave, their example gives me hope for South Africa. Oukasie had existed for half a century to tend the rose bushes, work the factory lines, clean the clothes and mind the children for whites in Brits, half a mile away. Trouble was, the whites had suddenly decided that Oukasie was getting too close.
SPORTS
July 10, 1991
1956--The International Table Tennis Federation expels the all-white South African Table Tennis Union. 1960--South Africa fields a team in the Olympics for what turns out to be the last time. The team is all-white. 1962--South Africa is invited to the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo. 1964 South Africa's Olympic invitation is withdrawn because the government refuses to send an integrated team. 1968--Several countries threaten to boycott the Mexico City Olympics if South Africa is present.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like most inhabitants of the vast urban melting pot of Soweto, Wilson and Isabel Zitha have fond, if not particularly strong, feelings about their ancient cultural heritages. So, when Zulus began battling Xhosas in the streets outside their modest home recently, Wilson, who is Xhosa, and Isabel, who is Zulu, looked on in stunned silence. And Isabel began to feel ashamed of her own roots. "How can I say I am Zulu? People are starting to hate us," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Playwright John Kani sets his South African drama "Nothing but the Truth" in the year 2000, a decade after the repeal of apartheid and four years into a process of assessing human rights abuses committed during the bloodiest years of the nation's racially discriminatory laws. This investigation is overseen by the new government's Truth and Reconciliation Commission -- a name that, fortuitously, encodes the themes in Kani's play, being given its West Coast premiere at the Mark Taper Forum.
NEWS
June 19, 1991 | Associated Press
1949--Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act passed. 1950--Population Registration Act passed. Immorality Act tightened to ban interracial sex.Group Areas Act (residential segregation) passed. 1951--Mixed-race Coloreds removed from the voting roll. 1952--U.N. condemns apartheid. 1953--Reservation of Separate Amenities Act (which segregated public facilities, from toilets to libraries to swimming pools) passed. 1985--Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act repealed.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like most inhabitants of the vast urban melting pot of Soweto, Wilson and Isabel Zitha have fond, if not particularly strong, feelings about their ancient cultural heritages. So, when Zulus began battling Xhosas in the streets outside their modest home recently, Wilson, who is Xhosa, and Isabel, who is Zulu, looked on in stunned silence. And Isabel began to feel ashamed of her own roots. "How can I say I am Zulu? People are starting to hate us," she said.
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