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South Africa Immigration

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NEWS
July 21, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crocodiles and electrified razor wire are not enough to discourage Mashinga Homera from his perilous journeys south to find work. He spends more than he can afford on bus fare, risks the crocodiles lurking in the wide, shallow Limpopo River, and braves cuts and electrical burns from the fence marking the Zimbabwe-South Africa border.
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NEWS
July 21, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crocodiles and electrified razor wire are not enough to discourage Mashinga Homera from his perilous journeys south to find work. He spends more than he can afford on bus fare, risks the crocodiles lurking in the wide, shallow Limpopo River, and braves cuts and electrical burns from the fence marking the Zimbabwe-South Africa border.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1989
The purpose of this letter is to express concern about the current political activities of the mayor of Irvine and several members of the Irvine City Council. They have made public statements concerning radically reducing the budget of the Department of Defense, they passed an ordinance broadening civil rights, and now they are discussing special rules designed to protect the ozone layer of the earth's atmosphere. A very ambitious project for any city council! Even if we concede that the council members are acting out of the noblest motives, it is clear that they are greatly exceeding their mandate when they concern themselves with national issues.
NEWS
January 19, 1997 | ANGUS SHAW, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Moses Mutembo took what should have been a grim ride with a smile and a joke. "See you next week," the 18-year-old told guards on a government train hauling him back to the border for deportation to Mozambique. South Africa's immigration officials aren't laughing. But they concede the difficulty of trying to halt the flow of impoverished Africans to the strong economy and loose borders of South Africa.
OPINION
September 8, 1985
No matter how smart they are, people can absorb just so much conflicting advice and contradictory data before they freeze, incapable of making any decisions at all. Some historians say that it happened to Napoleon at Waterloo. There is a whiff of Waterloo on Capitol Hill. After spending at least part of a month's vacation among the voters, what Congress seems to want most urgently is protection against foreign imports. What President Reagan wants, above all, is tax reform.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
In a bold venture--its first--into the sphere of national television documentaries, San Francisco educational station KQED Thursday previewed here its prime-time look at one of the most controversial domestic issues, "The Abortion Battle." The three-hour documentary is scheduled to air Wednesday on 251 out of 312 public television stations across the country (in the Los Angeles area it will be seen at 8 p.m. on Channels 28, 15, 24 and 50).
NEWS
June 24, 2007 | Paul Salopek, Chicago Tribune
The greasy brown river sliding past this African border town might seem eerily familiar to Americans. First, there are the concrete international bridges that span its waters, linking a relatively affluent community on one side -- tidy, well-paved, replete with American franchises such as Kentucky Fried Chicken -- with a dustier, impoverished town on the other.
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