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BUSINESS
June 7, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
PepsiCo Inc. to Return to South Africa: The soft drink giant, which pulled out of the country in 1985 because of anti-apartheid sanctions, said it will form a local bottling joint venture in which black investors will hold a majority stake, and that it plans to expand into other countries in the region. Pepsi would not disclose the value and certain other details of the investment, citing competitive reasons. Egoli Beverages, a U.S.
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BUSINESS
January 25, 1996 | From Associated Press
Nobody said making beer in war-shattered Mozambique would be easy, but where there's water, there's a way. And maybe there's new profits for a big brewer hoping to expand across Africa, a continent most others see as a hopeless investment. Anheuser-Busch? Miller? Heineken? No, and not Bass, Fosters or the big Japanese outfits, either. Try South African Breweries, the world's sixth-largest beer maker by volume, although it's little-known off the southern tip of Africa.
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BUSINESS
September 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
S. African Police Force Striking Truckers From Highway: Signaling that the government will not tolerate strikes disrupting the economy, South African soldiers Wednesday forced 700 truckers demanding higher wages to clear a major highway they had blocked. President Nelson Mandela told labor unions earlier this month that strikes would scare off foreign investors, who are deemed essential to rejuvenating the economy. Labor unrest has plagued South Africa for the past two months.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During apartheid, the Divpac can factory here was known as "Beirut," and with good reason. Racial and political hostilities poisoned labor relations. In 1990, a race riot on the factory floor left more than 30 employees injured. Whites carried handguns as they worked, while blacks brandished knives. Bitter strikes and lockouts were frequent. Adding to the tension, Lee Coetzee, head of the local whites-only union, was regional commandant of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, or AWB.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten months ago, a black South African businessman emerged from a prison visit with Nelson Mandela and raised the hopes of free-market advocates by announcing that the African National Congress leader was beginning to sound soft on nationalization. Mandela promptly sent his followers a rare message: "The nationalization of the mines, banks and monopoly industries is the policy of the ANC, and a change or modification of our views in this regard is inconceivable." Change of Heart?
BUSINESS
January 25, 1996 | From Associated Press
Nobody said making beer in war-shattered Mozambique would be easy, but where there's water, there's a way. And maybe there's new profits for a big brewer hoping to expand across Africa, a continent most others see as a hopeless investment. Anheuser-Busch? Miller? Heineken? No, and not Bass, Fosters or the big Japanese outfits, either. Try South African Breweries, the world's sixth-largest beer maker by volume, although it's little-known off the southern tip of Africa.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson R. Mandela, submitting to dozens of interviews with television journalists from around the world, said Wednesday the African National Congress is willing to compromise and consider constitutional guarantees for South Africa's white minority but will not budge on the issue of full black voting rights.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a historic day for South Africa's black liberation struggle, Nelson Mandela on Friday took his case to United Nations diplomats and to captains of American industry, drawing vigorous standing ovations as he pleaded for emotional and financial support. The political prisoner turned world statesman, addressing the most influential audiences since his arrival in the United States three days ago, urged the United Nations to resist any temptation to ease Pretoria's isolation.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During apartheid, the Divpac can factory here was known as "Beirut," and with good reason. Racial and political hostilities poisoned labor relations. In 1990, a race riot on the factory floor left more than 30 employees injured. Whites carried handguns as they worked, while blacks brandished knives. Bitter strikes and lockouts were frequent. Adding to the tension, Lee Coetzee, head of the local whites-only union, was regional commandant of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, or AWB.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1994 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of prominent African Americans, including actor Danny Glover and basketball star Shaquille O'Neal, on Monday announced a $20-million partnership with Pepsi to reintroduce the company's products to South Africa. The announcement--designed to encourage others to make similar investments--coincided with South African President Nelson Mandela's trip to New York in search of U.S. business investment in his post-apartheid nation.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
S. African Police Force Striking Truckers From Highway: Signaling that the government will not tolerate strikes disrupting the economy, South African soldiers Wednesday forced 700 truckers demanding higher wages to clear a major highway they had blocked. President Nelson Mandela told labor unions earlier this month that strikes would scare off foreign investors, who are deemed essential to rejuvenating the economy. Labor unrest has plagued South Africa for the past two months.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
PepsiCo Inc. to Return to South Africa: The soft drink giant, which pulled out of the country in 1985 because of anti-apartheid sanctions, said it will form a local bottling joint venture in which black investors will hold a majority stake, and that it plans to expand into other countries in the region. Pepsi would not disclose the value and certain other details of the investment, citing competitive reasons. Egoli Beverages, a U.S.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten months ago, a black South African businessman emerged from a prison visit with Nelson Mandela and raised the hopes of free-market advocates by announcing that the African National Congress leader was beginning to sound soft on nationalization. Mandela promptly sent his followers a rare message: "The nationalization of the mines, banks and monopoly industries is the policy of the ANC, and a change or modification of our views in this regard is inconceivable." Change of Heart?
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a historic day for South Africa's black liberation struggle, Nelson Mandela on Friday took his case to United Nations diplomats and to captains of American industry, drawing vigorous standing ovations as he pleaded for emotional and financial support. The political prisoner turned world statesman, addressing the most influential audiences since his arrival in the United States three days ago, urged the United Nations to resist any temptation to ease Pretoria's isolation.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1994 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of prominent African Americans, including actor Danny Glover and basketball star Shaquille O'Neal, on Monday announced a $20-million partnership with Pepsi to reintroduce the company's products to South Africa. The announcement--designed to encourage others to make similar investments--coincided with South African President Nelson Mandela's trip to New York in search of U.S. business investment in his post-apartheid nation.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | Reuters
At least 10 miners were killed and 16 were hurt Monday by falling rocks at a gold mine near Johannesburg, prompting union demands for an investigation. The mine owner, Anglo American Corp. of South Africa Ltd., said the accident occurred 7,800 feet below the surface at the Western Deep Levels mine after an earth temblor. About 700 miners, most of them black, died in accidents in South Africa's mining industry last year.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson R. Mandela, submitting to dozens of interviews with television journalists from around the world, said Wednesday the African National Congress is willing to compromise and consider constitutional guarantees for South Africa's white minority but will not budge on the issue of full black voting rights.
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