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South Africa Labor

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NEWS
August 21, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Three of South Africa's mining companies, adopting tougher tactics to deal with a strike by black miners, began firing thousands of the strikers Thursday when they refused to return to work in the country's gold mines. Anglo American Corp., hit hardest by the strike, dismissed more than 2,000 strikers at one shaft of its sprawling Vaal Reefs mine at Orkney, about 100 miles southwest of Johannesburg, when they rejected an ultimatum to go back to work.
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NEWS
August 25, 1999 | From Associated Press
In the largest labor protest since apartheid ended, hundreds of thousands of South African public workers held a one-day strike Tuesday, marching in cities across the country to demand wage increases. But President Thabo Mbeki's 2-month-old administration--facing a breach with its traditional labor support--signaled its determination to hold firm against workers' demands, despite earlier indications that it would hold new talks with unions.
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NEWS
April 24, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The bloody clashes between police and striking black railway workers that left six people dead and more than 20 injured here this week appear to have been planned by "trained terrorists" operating from the offices of South Africa's largest labor union federation, the police said Thursday.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During apartheid, the Divpac can factory here was known as "Beirut," and with good reason. Racial and political hostilities poisoned labor relations. In 1990, a race riot on the factory floor left more than 30 employees injured. Whites carried handguns as they worked, while blacks brandished knives. Bitter strikes and lockouts were frequent. Adding to the tension, Lee Coetzee, head of the local whites-only union, was regional commandant of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, or AWB.
NEWS
August 10, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
More than 200,000 black miners went on strike at 46 of South Africa's gold and coal mines Sunday night to support their demands for a 30% pay increase and demonstrate the growing political and economic power of the country's black labor unions, labor leaders reported. The strike, the biggest test of strength yet between the National Union of Mineworkers and the South African Chamber of Mines, began as most workers on the overnight shift at 28 gold and 18 coal mines reportedly did not go to work.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
S. Africa Workers, Labor Management Agree: Labor and management clashed--and the winner was South Africa's new black-led government, with its vision of promoting development through cooperation. After months of negotiations, Sam Shilowa, head of the country's most powerful and militant union federation, and business representative Bobby Godsell spoke of working together to build economic stability as they described their joint recommendations for a new labor relations bill.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | From Reuters
South African trade union and business leaders said Saturday that they have drawn up a peace charter to revitalize stalled democracy talks and minimize the crippling effect of next month's pro-democracy general strike. A statement by the 1.
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
A surge of township violence and clashes with the police left eight blacks dead and several dozen injured Tuesday, the second day of a nationwide strike by more than 1 million black workers to protest restrictions on anti-apartheid groups. The strike, part of a three-day protest called by the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU), lost a little steam Tuesday but remained widespread.
NEWS
June 7, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of thousands of black South Africans, defying emergency restrictions, refused to report for work Monday, beginning a three-day general strike to protest proposed new labor legislation and a government clampdown on anti-apartheid groups. There were scattered reports of violence, including a gasoline bomb attack on a commuter bus in Natal province that injured five people.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
A three-day general strike by more than 1 million blacks, the largest nationwide anti-apartheid protest since the South African government declared a nationwide state of emergency two years ago to quell growing unrest, ended Wednesday with police reports of two more deaths and numerous attacks on buses. The strength of the strike continued to be evident, especially around Johannesburg, Durban and Port Elizabeth.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
S. Africa Workers, Labor Management Agree: Labor and management clashed--and the winner was South Africa's new black-led government, with its vision of promoting development through cooperation. After months of negotiations, Sam Shilowa, head of the country's most powerful and militant union federation, and business representative Bobby Godsell spoke of working together to build economic stability as they described their joint recommendations for a new labor relations bill.
NEWS
August 4, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Millions of blacks joined one of the largest protest strikes in South African history Monday, shutting down townships, factories and businesses nationwide in an attempt to pressure the white government to end violence and relinquish power. At least 12 blacks were killed in strike-related violence on the first day of the two-day protest. Among the injured were two white journalists shot by black gunmen who hijacked their car in Sebokeng township, south of Johannesburg.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | From Reuters
South African trade union and business leaders said Saturday that they have drawn up a peace charter to revitalize stalled democracy talks and minimize the crippling effect of next month's pro-democracy general strike. A statement by the 1.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | From Associated Press
Blacks across South Africa boycotted work Tuesday to commemorate one of their biggest rebellions, and Nelson Mandela called it the start of a campaign that would bring down the white-led government. Despite widespread appeals for peace, at least 34 people died in political violence surrounding the anniversary of the 1976 Soweto uprising, including nine people gunned down in a Soweto rampage late Tuesday. President Frederik W.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A South African mining conglomerate began sending home thousands of black workers Monday after a week of clashes at one of its main gold mines here left at least 69 people dead and 177 injured. The violence at the Anglo American Corp. mine was apparently sparked by a two-day nationwide strike last week that was opposed by migrant Sotho miners from neighboring Lesotho working at the President Steyn Mine on the outskirts of this gold mining center.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the larger strikes in South African history, several million blacks stayed home from work Monday, shutting down factories and crippling businesses to protest a new sales tax and the lack of a black say in government economic policy. "A referendum was held in the streets of our country today," declared Jay Naidoo, leader of the Congress of South African Trade Unions, a 1.2-million-member labor federation and key strike organizer.
NEWS
May 17, 1988
South Africa's biggest black trade union federation called for three days of peaceful, nationwide protests June 6-8 against restrictions imposed on anti-apartheid organizations. The decision was made at a weekend congress in Johannesburg by 1,500 delegates from the 14 unions of the 700,000-member Congress of South African Trade Unions. Pretoria effectively banned 17 major anti-apartheid organizations on Feb. 24 and barred the federation from campaigning or discussing political issues.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
The nation's largest labor movement on Saturday threatened the government with strikes and a tax boycott to protest secret government payments to a rival group affiliated with the Inkatha Freedom Party. In a declaration at its national conference, the 1.25-million-member Congress of South African Trade Unions joined a growing list of anti-apartheid groups calling for the resignation of President Frederik W. de Klerk's government amid the growing scandal over the secret payments.
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