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NEWS
August 25, 1999 | From Associated Press
In the largest labor protest since apartheid ended, hundreds of thousands of South African public workers held a one-day strike Tuesday, marching in cities across the country to demand wage increases. But President Thabo Mbeki's 2-month-old administration--facing a breach with its traditional labor support--signaled its determination to hold firm against workers' demands, despite earlier indications that it would hold new talks with unions.
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NEWS
August 25, 1999 | From Associated Press
In the largest labor protest since apartheid ended, hundreds of thousands of South African public workers held a one-day strike Tuesday, marching in cities across the country to demand wage increases. But President Thabo Mbeki's 2-month-old administration--facing a breach with its traditional labor support--signaled its determination to hold firm against workers' demands, despite earlier indications that it would hold new talks with unions.
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NEWS
August 20, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During apartheid, the Divpac can factory here was known as "Beirut," and with good reason. Racial and political hostilities poisoned labor relations. In 1990, a race riot on the factory floor left more than 30 employees injured. Whites carried handguns as they worked, while blacks brandished knives. Bitter strikes and lockouts were frequent. Adding to the tension, Lee Coetzee, head of the local whites-only union, was regional commandant of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, or AWB.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, the new government of President Thabo Mbeki looks like a workers' paradise. Six Cabinet members belong to the Central Committee of the South African Communist Party. At least two others are Communist Party members. The premier of Gauteng, the country's richest and most powerful province, was until recently leader of the Congress of South African Trade Unions, a partner with the Communists and the African National Congress in the country's ruling alliance.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, the new government of President Thabo Mbeki looks like a workers' paradise. Six Cabinet members belong to the Central Committee of the South African Communist Party. At least two others are Communist Party members. The premier of Gauteng, the country's richest and most powerful province, was until recently leader of the Congress of South African Trade Unions, a partner with the Communists and the African National Congress in the country's ruling alliance.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During apartheid, the Divpac can factory here was known as "Beirut," and with good reason. Racial and political hostilities poisoned labor relations. In 1990, a race riot on the factory floor left more than 30 employees injured. Whites carried handguns as they worked, while blacks brandished knives. Bitter strikes and lockouts were frequent. Adding to the tension, Lee Coetzee, head of the local whites-only union, was regional commandant of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, or AWB.
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